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1254245 



GENET^LOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01072 6039 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



35 



I'LAN OF OAKHAM 
showing the Original Lots and the Public Roads laid out before the year 1800. 



What is now Oakham was the West Wing of Rutland from 1722 to 1750, and the Precinct 
of Rutland West Wing from 1759 to 1762 when it was incorporated as a district by the name 
of Oakham. 



SOLDIER S OF OAKHAM, 

MASSAC HU SETTS 

IN 

THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 
THE WAR OF 1812 

AKD. 

THE CIVIL WAR 




HENRY' ^A^J^a-y^RIQliT. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press 

1914 



COPYRIGHTED, I9I4, BY 
THE TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR CO. 



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



PUBLISHED AUGUST, I914 



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MCARDEO 



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TO THE MEMORY OF 

CAPTAIN JOHN CRAWFORD 

[1739-1824] 



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SOME OAKHAM DATES 

First settlements within the limits of the town, not later than 1750. 

Established as Precinct of Rutland West Wing, 1759. 

First meeting-house erected, 1761. 

Oakham incorporated as a district, June 7, 1762. 

Rev. John Strickland ordained and installed over Presbyterian church, 
April I, 1767. 

Church reorganized after Congregational form, June 2Z, 1773- 

Oakham District made a town by general act, August 23, 1775. 

Rev. Daniel Tomlinson ordained and settled, June 22, 1786. 

Sixth Massachusetts Turnpike incorporated, 1799. 

Oakham Post Office established, April i, 1813. 

New meeting-house dedicated, 1815. 

First stage line through the town, 1818. 1 

The north village first called Coldbrook, 1832. 

Rev. James Kimball ordained and installed, December 26, 1832. 

Methodist meeting-house dedicated, October i, 1843. 

Congregational meeting-house remodeled; dedicated, February 12, 1846. 

Rev. Francis N. Peloubet installed, December 26, i860. 

Ware River Railroad opened, October, 1873. 

Memorial Hall dedicated, January i, 1875. 

Central Massachusetts Railroad opened, December, 1887. 

Town Clock, presented by Mr. Henry E. Dean, dedicated, August 30, 
1905. 

Fobes Memorial Library, presented by Charles A. Fobes, Mrs. Celia 
E. Fobes, and Mrs. Harriet F. Gifford, dedicated, August 27, 1908. 

Mail service by automobile established, October, 191 1. 



PREFACE 

The town of Oakham was fortunate in having- during the 
most important periods of its early history clerks who kept full 
and clear records. It is not probable that those who made the 
records had any thought of their future value as historical docu- 
ments. They made them complete that there might be no doubt 
about the responsibility of those who were chosen to public 
office; but in their effort to make everything plain, they left us 
very detailed information about the early history of the town. 
The records of the first forty-four years fill two large volumes, 
containing together seven hundred and ninety-one pages. The 
eight years of the Revolutionary War cover two hundred and 
four pages. Fortunately, also, during the one hundred and fifty 
years when the town documents were not safeguarded as they 
are to-day, not a page of any of the record books was lost or 
destroyed. 

By the wise action of the State authorities, there are kept, in 
the libraries of the town officers and in the Free Public Libraries 
of all Massachusetts towns, many works of great value that are 
too little appreciated. In these libraries may be found printed 
copies of many important early colonial and state documents; 
the military record of the soldiers from the State in the Revolu- 
tionary War and in the War of 1812; the Adjutant General's 
reports during the period of the Civil W^ar ; and also vital 
records of Massachusetts towns and cities. With such material 
at hand to supplement the records of the town clerks, it is pos- 
sible to prepare a history of the men from any Massachusetts 
town who have served the country as soldiers. 

When in 1866 the Oakham Soldiers' Union proposed to keep 
in permanent form brief biographies of the soldiers from the 
town in the Civil War, it was not expected that these sketches 
would be printed, much less that they would form part of a 
printed volume. But during the half -century that has since 
elapsed, the soldiers who survived the war have lived as private 
citizens engaged in their several occupations, have filled out their 



VI SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

family history, and have taken an active part in the public life 
of the communities in which their work has been done. No 
sketches of their lives could be thought of now which did not 
include what they have accomplished since the war, and what 
they have stood for as citizens and as men. 

The men that constituted the Union Army were the best that 
the country produced. An army in time of war is no place for 
men weak physically or morally. The Union soldiers were not 
only men of strength and courage, but also men of character. 
In no war ever waged v/ere the soldiers of better quality. The 
enormous debt incurred on account of the war was repaid, but 
the loss to the nation of hundreds of thousands of such young 
men can never be made up. 

If there are any men who deserve to be remembered for what 
they have sacrificed for the sake of others, it is those who have 
served in the army in time of war. Only those who have seen 
actual service can fully realize what it means for a young man 
to give up home and friends, and to endure the hardships and 
the undermining influences of army life, and to face the dangers 
of a protracted war. If he returns uninjured, no soldier who 
has been long in the service can ever be repaid for what he has 
lost, physically, mentally, and morally. And what a multitude of 
young men in the Civil War either did not return, or came back 
crippled for life! 

When I remember how much life has brought to me since 
the close of the war; in my home life; in the opportunity for 
service; in the joy of interest in the world's progress for half 
a century; and in the privilege of having even a little share in 
the work that has been done; and remember also that every one 
of our soldiers who were killed in battle or died by disease lost 
all this, I begin to appreciate what the sacrifice of so many young 
lives meant. 

In the preparation of this book I have not only been living 
again among old friends, but have sometimes seemed to myself 
to be renewing an acquaintance with men brought back upon 
the stage from former generations. I knew personally the 
greater part of the soldiers from Oakham in the Civil War. 



PREFACE Vii 

One-fourth of them had been my pupils, and a large proportion 
had been my playmates and friends. I had seen the greater 
part of the men from the town who were in the War of 1812. 
From early childhood I had heard much about the soldiers in 
the Revolutionary War from my grandmother, by whom I was 
brought up, who was the widow of a Revolutionary soldier and 
the daughter of John Crawford, Captain of the Oakham company 
from 1775 to 1783. 

It has been a pleasure to gather, from the records of the town 
and the state, the history of the Oakham men who served in the 
War for Independence, but it has been especially gratifying to 
bring to light in a neighboring town a Revolutionary document 
supposed to have been irrecoverably lost. The fortunate dis- 
covery of a pay roll of Captain How's company for service on 
the Hudson in the latter part of 1776 gives encouragement to 
hope that copies of other such supposedly lost muster or pay 
rolls will yet be found. 

Miss Mary A. French, of North Brookfield, into whose keep- 
ing a package of manuscript regarding the French family had 
come by inheritance, was greatly surprised to find that among 
these papers there was this list of Revolutionary soldiers made 
more than one hundred and thirty years before by her ancestor. 
Lieutenant French. The roll seems to have been either unnoticed 
or thought of no importance by those who had previously pos- 
sessed these documents after the death of Lieutenant French in 
1832. Though a portion of it was once thrown into the waste- 
basket, it was fortunately recovered, and the roll is preserved 
entire, with every name legible. 

The possession by one of his descendants of this copy of a 
pay roll made by Lieutenant French, and also the discovery 
among the papers of Captain William Crawford of a copy of 
the roll of his Company in the War of 18 12, shows that an officer 
may have kept the first draft of his report, having made a better 
written copy to send in. 

Great care has been taken to make the statements in this book 
correct, and the authorities are cited for most facts to which the 
writer himself cannot testify. But there must still be errors and 



via SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

omissions. Sometime a fuller history of the tOAvn will probably 
be written, and a more complete genealogy of Oakham families. 
With this in view, I earnestly request those who read any part 
of this book to send me corrections of errors found in it, and 
to give any additional information which they possess regarding 
the Oakham families to which they belong, or from which they 
are descended. 

Many have helped to gather material for the biographical 
sketches, to all of whom the author acknowledges his obligations. 
He is especially indebted to Miss Emily K. Fobes of Worcester, 
for searching the Worcester County Records ; to Mr. Ernest 
L. Hayward of Taunton, for the preparation of the Index ; and 
to Professor Henry Burt Wright of New Haven, who has verified 
the authorities for the Soldiers of the Revolutionary War, and 
given valuable assistance in every part of the work. 

Henry P. Wright. 
New Haven, Conn., January 5, 1914. 



Soldiers of Oakham, Massachusetts 

fijj HENRY PARKS WRIGHT 

Formerly Dean of Yale College 

This Iiook gives the military record of all soldiers from Oakham who 
served in the Revolutionary War. in the War of 1812, and in the Civil 
War, with the family history of each, and the authorities on which the 
histories are based. Among the families represented are the following : 

Allen. Adams. Bassetf, Bell, Berry. Black. Blair, Bolton. Bothivell, Boyd, 
Brown. Billiard. Butler, Caldzvell. Chaddock, Conant, Crazvford. Dean, 
Dunbar. Edson, fairbank. Field. Forbes. Foster. French, Gould, Green. 
Hart^er, Haskell. Haydcn. Henderson. Hozcell, Hudson, Johnson, Joslyn, 
Kimball. Knii^ht. Lincoln, Lovell. Macomber, McFarland, Maynard, Nye, 
Packard. Parker. Pannenter. Partridge. Perkins. Razi'son, Reed, Robinson, 
Sargeaiit, Shazi', Spooner, Stone, JValker, Ware, JVarreji, Washburn, 
Waterman. White. Jl'ilbtir, Wilson, Wood, Woodis, Wright. 

The newly discovered Pay Roll of Captain How's company, which was 
in service in New York in September and November, 1776, containing ten 
new names of Massachusetts soldiers in the Revolutionary War, is here 
printed for the first time. 

An account is also given of William O'Brien, George Perkins, and 
George Walls, three British soldiers who escaped from General Burgoyne's 
captured troops while prisoners at Rutland, lived for a time in Oakham, 
and later enlisted in the Continental Army. 

Three hundred and twenty-five pages, octavo, with Index, bound in full 
cloth. Price $2.50, sent by mail, postage prepaid, on receipt of the price, 
by the Publishers 

The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company 

123 TEMPLE STREET, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



CONTENTS 

The Soldiers' Union, ...... 3-14 

Organization, 3. Memorial Hall, 5. Building Committee, 
6. Dedication, 7. Address of Henry P. Wright, 8. Ad- 
dress of Rev. F. X. Peloubet, 11. Presidents of Soldiers' 
Union, 14. 

The Revolution, ....... 17-33 

Minutemen, 18. Eight Months' Regiments, 19. Oakham 
Militia Company, 21. Ticonderoga Campaign, 22. Cam- 
paigns to New York in 1776, 22. Captain How's Company, 
23. Continental Army (1777), 24. Casualties among the 
Continental Soldiers, 25. Josiah Whitney's Regiment, 26, 
30. Rhode Island Alarm, 26. Danforth Keyes's Regiment, 
2.'/. Bennington Alarm, 28. Stillwater Campaign, 28. 
Guards, 29. March to Enfield, 30. Campaign to Rhode 
Island. 30. Claverack, 31. Continental Army (1780), 31. 
West Point, 31, z^- Town Officers during the Revolution, 32. 

Soldiers in the Revolutionary War, .... 34-156 

Authorities and Abbreviations, 34. Biographical Sketches, 
35- 

The War of 1812, 157-171 

Authorities, 158. Washington Grenadiers, 160. Bio- 
graphical Sketches of Soldiers in the War of 1812, 163. 
Town Officers during the years 1812-14, 171. 

Seminole and Mexican Wars, ..... 172 

The Civil War, 173-267 

Authorities, 174. Three Months' Regiments, 175. Bio- 
graphical Sketches — Massachusetts Regiments: Second 
Infantry, 176; Tenth Infantry, 176; Eleventh Infantry, 
177; Thirteenth Infantry, 178; Fifteenth Infantry, 179; 
Twenty-first Infantry, 181; Twenty-fifth Infantrj-, 183; 
Thirty-first Infantry, 205; Thirty fourth Infantry, 206; 
Thirty-sixth Infantry, 210; Thirty-ninth Infantry, 225; 



X SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Fortieth Infantry, 226; Forty-second Infantry, 226; Forty- 
fourth Infantry, 231; Forty-sixth Infantry, 232; Fifty- 
first Infantry, 234 ; Fifty-second Infantry, 245 ; Fourth 
Cavalry, 246; Second Heavy Artillery, 250; Fourth Heavy 
Artillery, 252; Eleventh Battery, 253; Sixtieth Infantry, 
254; Sixth Unattached Volunteer Militia, 255. Enlistments 
in Other States: One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania 
Infantry, 256; Second Michigan Cavalry, 256; Thirty-sixth 
Iowa Infantry, 259; Sixth Vermont Infantry, 260; First 
Vermont Cavalry, 261 ; Contract Service, 261 ; Second Ohio 
Heavy Artillery, 262. Summary, 264. Town Officers during 
the Civil War, 266. 

Addenda, ........ 269-279 

Authorities, 270. Captain How's Company, 271. Cap- 
tain How's Pay Roll, 274. John French, 2d, 278. Captain 
William Crawford's Pay Roll, 280. John Rice Crawford, 
282. 

Index, ........ 285-325 

General Index, 287. Companies in the Revolutionary 
War, 293. Regiments in the Revolutionary War, 313. 
Town Lots, 319. Index of Towns, 322. 



THE SOLDIERS' UNION 



THE SOLDIERS' UNION 

The Oakham Soldiers' Union grew out of a meeting of a few 
returned soldiers, in the vestry of the Congregational Church, on 
the evening of August 17, 1866. Major Fairbank, Andrew 
Spooner, and Sergeant Temple were requested to prepare a 
constitution, and, a week later, the Union was organized. Any- 
resident of the town who had served in the Army or Navy of 
the United States and had been honorably discharged, and any 
person who had enlisted from the town and had been honorably 
discharged, was eligible for membership. 

The annual meetings of the Soldiers' Union became at once 
the important social event of the year for the town, and were 
continued regularly for nearly a quarter of a century. A part 
of each meeting was given to addresses on war subjects and 
to other suitable exercises, and a part to social entertainment, 
which included a supper served by the ladies of Oakham. The 
proceeds of the annual meetings were deposited in the North 
Brookfield Savings Bank, and the deposits were increased by 
various entertainments planned by joint committees of the 
citizens and soldiers. 

The association from the beginning had before it two plans: 
(i) the erection of some form of a monument to the soldiers 
who lost their lives in the Civil War; (2) the preservation of 
a brief biography of all the men who enlisted from the town 
in that war. 

When the Union had reached its sixth year, it had accumulated 
funds which justified it in beginning to make plans for a 
soldiers' memorial. At the annual meeting in 1872, two proposi- 
tions were presented by a committee which had been appointed 
at the previous annual meeting: 

(i) A hall for town and public uses, with memorial tablets. 

(2) A monument erected on the Village Green. 
The attendance at this meeting was large, and the majority of 
those present expressed their preference for a hall. 



4 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

On January I, 1873, th^ Treasurer's report showed a balance 
of $1,232.48 in the treasury. At this meeting the Union 
appointed a committee, consisting of two soldiers and five citi- 
zens, "to see what can be done by the citizens and by the town 
toward building a hall, and to present plans of a building suit- 
able for memorial purposes, and an estimate of the cost of 
building." The committee were instructed to make their report 
within three months. No report was ever received from this 
committee. 

On the part of several prominent citizens there was strong 
opposition to an appropriation toward the erection of a memorial 
hall. The town was already heavily burdened by the expenses 
of the war, and by the railroad debt. In order to get a definite 
decision from the town and the citizens, the following resolu- 
tion was presented by Andrew Spooner, at a meeting of the 
Union on December 31, 1873: 

"Whereas, a committee was chosen at the last annual meeting 
of this association, on January ist, 1873, to consider and report 
upon plans, specifications, and cost of building a suitable 
memorial hall, with instructions to report within three months, 
and no report from said committee has been received, and 
whereas it is desirable that the matter of a soldiers' memorial 
be finally disposed of, therefore 

Resolved, that a committee be chosen at this time whose duty 
it shall be to proceed to the erection of a suitable soldiers' 
memorial, and that if no feasible plan for building a suitable 
hall be presented to them previous to the first day of January, 
1875, they be instructed to erect a suitable monument, to be 
completed before September ist, 1875, the cost of which shall 
not exceed twelve hundred dollars, and that they be empowered 
to draw on the treasury for the payment of the same." 

After much discussion, action on this resolution was post- 
poned, that those in favor of a memorial hall might have oppor- 
tunity to ascertain what contributions of money, building 
material, and labor would be made by citizens, and what the 
town would vote to do. A canvass of the town showed that 



THE SOLDIERS UNION 5 

twelve hundred dollars could be raised from the citizens. The 
question was then presented to the town, at a meeting held 
March 17, 1874. At this meeting the town 

"Voted to appropriate two thousand dollars, when the soldiers 
and the voluntary contributors shall guarantee the balance of 
the four thousand and four hundred dollars required to build 
the proposed hall." 

Upon further consideration it seemed best for the interests 
of the town to erect a building which should contain both a 
hall for town and memorial purposes, and two or more rooms 
for a center school. Another tov^-n meeting was called, to be 
held March 31, to see whether the town would appropriate five 
hundred dollars more. At the beginning of this meeting it 
was voted that no one be allowed to speak on the question more 
than three times, or more than five minutes at a time. After 
a lengthy and exciting debate the town by a large majority 

"Voted, that the town raise and appropriate the sum of twenty- 
five hundred dollars, including the two thousand dollars already 
appropriated by the town on the 17th of March current, for 
the purpose of erecting a town hall and two school rooms in 
one building." 

The Soldiers' Union held a meeting on April 11, and passed 
the following resolution : 

"Resolved, that the Soldiers' Union will give to the town for 
the purpose of erecting a schoolhouse and town hall the sum 
of Twelve Hundred Dollars ($1,200), upon the following 
conditions, namely: 

(i) That the town and citizens furnish a sum sufficient to 
complete the building proposed. 

(2) That suitable tablets shall be placed therein for a soldiers' 
memorial by the Soldiers' Union, and maintained for all time 
by the town. 

(3) That the Soldiers' Union have the free use of said Hall 
for all such meetings as they may desire to hold from year to 
year." 

The Soldiers' Union appropriated $260 in addition, for 
memorial tablets. 



6 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

A Building Committee was appointed consisting o£ nine mem- 
bers, three to represent the town, three the Soldiers' Union, 
and three the citizens: 

For the town: Alanson Prouty, Avery C. BuUard, Alonzo 
Lincoln. 

For the Soldiers' Union: Dr. J. G. Shannon, George W. Stone, 
Stephen Boyden. 

For the citizens: Page Austin, Deacon James Packard, Leonard 
P. Lovell. 

Page Austin was elected Chairman. 

Memorial Hall was completed before the close of the year and 
was dedicated on Friday evening, January i, 1875. 

The building contains two school rooms and a Selectmen's 
room on the first floor, and a hall, called Memorial Hall, on 
the second floor. The hall is used for town meetings, for public 
lectures, and for entertainments of all kinds. The school rooms 
are for the use of the Center School District, and also for 
pupils in the higher grades from any part of the town. 

Few of the soldiers who organized the Union or were mem- 
bers of it are now living, but their work for the town abides 
in this building, which has been for nearly forty years of incal- 
culable value to the citizens of the town and to their children. 
May it long remain a monument to the soldiers of Oakham in 
the Civil War. 

The second purpose of the Soldiers' Union — the preservation 
of brief biographies of the soldiers from Oakham in the Civil 
War — is fulfilled by the publication of this book. The plan 
has been enlarged so as to include also the soldiers from the 
town in the Revolutionary War and in the War of 1812. 



THE soldiers' UNION 

EXERCISES 

AT THE 

Dedication of Memorial Hall 

FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 1, 1875 



Presiding Officer, Mark Haskell 



Prayer Rev. Alpha Morton 

Report of the Building Committee and Presentation of the Keys, 

Page Austin, Chairman of the Building Committee 

Acceptance on behalf of the Town, 

Moses O. Ayres, Chairman of the Selectmen 

Presentation of the Memorial Tablets, . . . Henry P. Wright 

Response, ........ Mark Haskell 

Poem, .... Ella M. Spooner, Mt. Holyoke Seminary 

Address Rev. F. N. Peloubet of Natick, Mass. 

Music by Crawford's Cornet Band and by Conant and Macomber's Orchestra 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



ADDRESS OF HENRY P. WRIGHT 

It has been thought appropriate that a few words be said 
concerning the part taken in the erection of this building by 
the Soldiers' Union. 

During the year following the close of the war, the returned 
soldiers of the Union Army residing in this town formed them- 
selves into an association called the Oakham Soldiers' Union, 
Its object, as set forth in the constitution, was "to cherish the 
memory of our fallen comrades, to preserve the friendships of 
camp and field, and to cultivate a sentiment of love and devotion 
to our country." At the beginning, the organization was 
designed to be of a social character. Its first meetings were 
attended only by soldiers, who passed the time chiefly in relating 
incidents of the war of which they themselves had personal 
knowledge. It was soon proposed to collect materials for a 
historical sketch of each soldier who enlisted from Oakham, 
and thus to preserve in permanent and accessible form a history 
of the town in the war. This has been partly done and will 
be completed. Another design was the erection, at some future 
time, of a suitable memorial to perpetuate the memory of those 
who fell in their country's service. 

Annual reunions were established, to be held on the first 
day of January of each year, to which all friends of the soldiers 
were invited. Their purpose was to keep alive the friendships 
formed in the war and to interest the people in our organiza- 
tion and its objects. These meetings, always well attended, 
have constantly increased in public favor, and it is to this, our 
ninth annual reunion, that you are welcomed for these dedicatory 
exercises. 

But something more was thought of than social entertainment. 
It seemed desirable to begin some movement, as early as pos- 
sible, to perpetuate the memory of the sacrifices of this people 
in the war. The returned soldiers were few in number, and 
when a memorial was first suggested we saw no way of raising 



THE SOLDIERS UNION 9 

money sufficient even for a humble monument. A little was 
saved from the annual meetings, a little added now and then 
from a social gathering; yet the sum of these littles was still 
small. The most timely aid rendered to our cause was by Mr. 
John B. Gough, who on so many occasions has placed the people 
of this town under lasting obligations to him, and whom we 
must ever hold in grateful remembrance. The proceeds of his 
lectures were added to our little fund, and it at once began 
to be respectable. The citizens of the town made our object 
their own, and by fairs and social entertainments the cause was 
helped on. By these means and by judicious investment, our 
accumulations became such that, two years ago, we began 
seriously to consider how they could best be used. After a 
very careful consideration of different plans, it was agreed to 
give the greater part of our fund to the town for the purpose 
of erecting a memorial building, providing the town and citizens 
would furnish enough to complete it. The town and citi- 
zens accepted the offer, and we united with them in the erection 
of this Hall, for which we were able to contribute one-fourth 
of the amount expended upon it. In itself, perhaps, the sum 
may seem small, but our gift was of great value for this reason, 
at least, that, without it, the building would not have been erected. 

In reviewing the success of this organization, we remember 
that it owes more than we can express in words to the citizens 
of this town. Many of you have been more active in helping 
than the members of the association themselves. We do not 
forget your services, and I wish here, in behalf of the Soldiers' 
Union, to express our deep gratitude to all of you who have 
in any way encouraged and assisted us during the last nine 
years. 

This is to be a Memorial Hall. The Soldiers' Union has 
erected here two plain marble tablets, on which are inscribed 
the names of the twenty-two soldiers from this town who fell 
in the war, and the four who have died since its close. Of this 
number, twenty died by disease; five fell in battle, two at 
Drury's Bluff, two at Cold Harbor, and one, just at the close 
of the war, at Petersburg; another, a captive, weakened by 



lO SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

wounds, laid down his life, a neglected sufferer, in a Confed- 
erate prison. They left peaceful homes, to which they were 
bound by the tender ties of domestic affection. At their coun- 
try's call they went forth, in the vigor of youth, and with 
patriotic ardor, to maintain the honor of our government and 
defend the nation's flag. When the war closed and the troops 
returned in triumph, they came not with them. The homes 
from which they had gone forth were clouded with grief, when 
other homes were joyous with victory. Here are names of sons 
and brothers, husbands, fathers and friends, familiar names of 
the companions and playmates of our childhood, who fifteen 
years ago were so active among us in all that interests young 
men. To the memory of these fallen ones we dedicate these 
tablets, that they may be to us, as we gather here from time 
to time, a visible memorial of our departed comrades, and may 
perpetuate their names to other generations, when we who knew 
them have passed away. 

To you, gentlemen, the ofiicial representatives of the town, 
and to your successors in office, we commit the keeping of these 
memorial tablets, in order that they may be preserved and pro- 
tected. We ask you to guard them sacredly, remembering the 
beloved names which they bear and the heroic sacrifices and 
deaths which they record. 



THE SOLDIERS UNION II 



ADDRESS OF REV. F. N. PELOUBET 

When at the close of the war Gen. Anderson went back to 
Fort Sumter with the same old flag which had been taken down 
at its evacuation four years before, and raised it once more 
over Sumter redeemed, he took his children with him to witness 
the ceremony. For his wife was a Georgian, and all her friends 
were secessionists. And both he and his wife being in feeble 
health, they knew not, if they should die, to what influences 
those children would be exposed. "But," said he, "if they see 
their father raise their country's flag, and witness these cere- 
monies, all the influences which can be brought to bear upon 
them will never make them false to the old flag." 

We have gathered here this evening to dedicate this comely 
Memorial Hall, which sits with its sister church, twin stars, 
patriotism and religion linked together, a double crown upon 
your hill seen from afar. 

Soldier hands with those of their fair sisters have helped to 
gather tlie means. Every farm has paid its proportion. Willing 
hearts have poured out their contributions to erect this beautiful 
building, where, below, the education of your youth shall fan 
the flame of love to country, and embody it in noble character, 
and, above, the names of those recorded on these tablets shall 
beckon them upward. And thus this building with its citizen and 
soldier builders, and the names recorded here, shall be endur- 
ing witnesses to children and children's children, so that no 
influences shall make them false to their country's flag, or their 
country's weal. It shall keep in mind that true interpretation 
of the old motto, "Our country, right or wrong — if right, to 
keep her right; if wrong, to make her right." 

The words of a Massachusetts colonel to his regiment as he 
fell wounded in battle, "State colors to the front, Massachusetts 
forward," were heard through every town and village of our 
state, and the young men of this town Oakham, i. e. Oakhome, 
with hearts of oak as well as name of oak, listened to the call. 



12 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Being pastor of the Oakham church, and citizen of the town 
before the war and remaining till it was ended, I was personally 
acquainted with most of these men. Sixteen were members of 
my church, three more of the Methodist church then existing 
here, and twenty-seven were members of the Sabbath School. 
It was with great pleasure that in my address of welcome to 
those who returned at the close of the war, I could say with 
truth that "so far as we can learn, you have to a man returned 
at least as good as you went away, and many we know, and all 
we hope, a great deal better. Many backsliders were made 
in the army, but not one hails from Oakham ; there were 
cowards, but none were nurtured among these hills; there 
were deserters, but no Oakham man failed in the hour of trial." 

Since then the returned soldiers have been scattered far and 
wide. One is now a pastor in the second largest city of New 
England; one is a professor in a college which, with only one 
peer and no superior, stands highest in this western world ; one 
is a Christian lawyer in a rising western state; others are 
merchants, or mechanics, or farmers in this and other towns. 
But to-night in spirit and memory we are all here again. 

We record the names of our fallen heroes in marble, but we 
engrave them more deeply on our hearts and memories. Sweetly 
they sleep in our cemeteries, where every year you decorate their 
graves with flowers, those beautiful emblems of resurrection, 
ever}'- one of which, growing out of the same ground in which 
our heroes sleep, says resurgemus, "we shall rise again." 

Those that lie in the valleys of the south, that sleep in unknown 
graves, God himself decorates with green and with flowers ; 

"Covers the thousands who sleep far away, 
Sleep where their friends cannot find them to-day; 
They who in mountain and hillside and dell 
Rest where they wearied, and sleep where they fell. 

Softly the grass blades creep round their repose, 
Sweetly above them the wild flowret blows; 
Zephyrs of freedom fly gently o'erhead, 
Whispering prayers for the patriot dead." 



THE SOLDIERS UNION I3 

How we felt here the absence of those men ! What a change 
it made in every department, to have so much young life flow 
out never to return! We missed them at home, in the church, 
in the Sabbath School, in the prayer meetings, in the social 
circles, in the literary lyceums, in the schools. We missed them 
everywhere. And yet we would not have them do otherwise 
than they did. We see now that to send forth loyal children 
to save their country is better than to keep ten thousand disloyal 
cowards at home. We see that the spirit of self-sacrifice for 
freedom leaves an unfading legacy as the years roll on. We 
should have been false to our town and its history, had we 
refused to hear the call for men. We should have been false 
to our church, and our fathers, and our God, had we been false 
to freedom. We should have been false to our education and 
our schools and our national institutions, had we allowed them 
to produce cowards and not men. 

There are two kinds of monuments which we can rear to 
our soldiers' memory. One is such a monument as this in 
which we are now assembled, a building in which the youth 
shall be educated with better advantages than they have had, 
with this hall above in which lectures, lyceums, public meetings, 
and the transactions of town business shall continue through 
life the education begun in the rooms below. How much more 
appropriate and touching, more expressive and beautiful, is this 
than a shaft of stone however elaborate, for it not only points 
upward, but it is steps upward. It not only helps us to remember 
the dead, but plants in us the virtues for which they died. It 
is a Jacob's Ladder, not in a dream, by which the whole town 
may join in "stepping heavenward." 

And there is something peculiarly fitting in the method by 
which it was built. The soldiers who returned safe from the 
war began to collect the funds ; and we should never forget 
that they were as brave and true soldiers, and offered as much 
to their country, as those whose names are recorded here. Then 
the citizens with free hand, and the town by taxation, have com- 
pleted the amount. Then also our mothers and wives and 
sisters have had no small part in this building, taking their full 



14 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

share of the sacrifice and the work ; and worthily, for they bore 
their full share of the burden and the sorrows of the war. Mother 
and wife balanced at home the sufferings of husband and son in 
the field. If ever we see, in heaven, the glorious army of earthly 
heroes, as many women will be in it as men, and soldiers' wives, 
and soldiers' mothers, and soldiers' daughters, though unnamed 
on tablets of stone, will be heard in the roll call of heroes and 
martyrs, and no crowns will be brighter, and no well dones 
worthier than theirs. 

This Hall, then, built by the living in honor of the dead, we 
dedicate to the memory of those soldiers who have given their 
lives for their country, and to the spread of that Liberty and 
Loyalty, Righteousness and Peace, for whose sake they died. 

And may the Good Father gather them and us around his 
throne in heaven, and say to all, IVell done, good and faithful 
soldiers, enter into the joy of your Lord. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE SOLDIERS' UNION 

Major John B. Fairbank, 1866-1872. 

Dr. J. G. Shannon, 1873- 1876. 

George W. Stone, 1877, 1878, 1886, 1887, 1890. 

Andrew Spooner, 1879. 

Stephen A. Boyden, 1880. 

William R. Barr, 1881. 

Charles A. Ware, 1882, 1883. 

John E. Stone, 1884. 

Edward J. Sargeant, 1885. 

Gardner M. Dean, 1888, 1889. 




MEMORIAL HALL 
November, 1S74 



THE REVOLUTION 



THE REVOLUTION 

During the first half-century after the incorporation of 
Oakham, it was the custom of the Town Clerks to make note, 
on their books, of public business done by any officer of the 
town. The Treasurer's report of monies received and paid 
out by him was copied entire in the minutes of the meeting at 
which the report was presented. Sometimes the receipts for 
money were written in the Town Records and there signed by 
the persons to whom the money was paid. The names of school- 
teachers, and of those who boarded school-teachers ; the names 
of those who came to preach as candidates when there was no 
settled minister, and of the persons who cared for them and for 
their horses, were entered on the records, with the amount paid 
for such services. That the Town Clerk, therefore, should copy 
in his reports the names of soldiers furnished by the town for 
any campaign, was to be expected, especially since the town 
gave its soldiers bounties, larger or smaller, in proportion to 
the difficulty of the service. The town records contain nearly 
complete lists of the men sent in answer to the many demands 
of the Provincial Legislature, and of the Continental Congress, 
but, since the bounties were often allowed as credit on the tax 
bills of the soldiers or of their fathers, the names of some soldiers 
do not appear on these lists. 

The State of Massachusetts has made accessible all the 
material which it possesses regarding the Revolutionary soldiers 
from the state, in the monumental work, in seventeen large 
volumes, Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary 
War. In most cases the account of service given in these vol- 
umes confirms that given on the town records; but it is to be 
noted that the rolls of some companies have not been preserved, 
and that a man may have served in a company before or after 
the time covered by any existing roll. In general the presence 
of a man's name on the muster roll or pay roll of a company 
only, must be taken as evidence that he served in that company, 



1 8 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

and the statement, on the town records only, that the Town 
Treasurer paid a man a certain sum as bounty for a given 
campaign, is evidence that he served as a soldier in that cam- 
paign. But when the two records agree the proof is beyond 
question. 

At the beginning of the Revolutionary War, the able-bodied 
men of Massachusetts of military age (that is, between sixteen 
and sixty) had already been drilled as soldiers, and detachments 
of them could be sent wherever they were needed, without wait- 
ing for the organization and discipline of companies and regi- 
ments which was necessary at the breaking out of the Civil 
War. A committee of the First Provincial Congress recom- 
mended, December lo, 1774, that one-fourth at least of the 
soldiers of each town should equip themselves as minutemen, 
ready to march on the shortest notice for the defence of the 
province. These were to be provided "with effective Fire arms, 
Bayonet, Pouch, Knapsack and Thirty rounds of Cartridges 
and Ball," and were to drill three times a week. Each com- 
pany was to elect its own officers. The Oakham militia company 
was probably under the command of Captain Jonathan Bullard. 
The men detailed to serve as minutemen, about thirty in number, 
chose John Crawford Captain and drilled regularly every other 
day, according to the recommendations of the Provincial 
Congress. 

The towns were advised to pay the minutemen a reasonable 
consideration, but the members of the Oakham company, like 
those in most other towns, were satisfied to equip themselves 
and drill without pay, provided the other soldiers of the town 
were also equipped and drilled; as is evident from a vote 
passed in town meeting March 6, 1775: "Voted that the Militia 
company & alarm men shall be equipt as well as possible & 
meet in the field and exersise, et cetera, which appears to satisfy 
the minutmen without any pay."* 

On the night before the attack on Lexington, an alarm was 
sent out by messengers to the several towns which appears to 

*0n April 16, 1776, the town "Voted to give the Minute-Men the Ten 
Dollars they received [from the province] at the alarm on the igth of 
April last (£3. os. od)." 



THE REVOLUTION 1 9 

have reached Oakham on the afternoon of April 19. On the 
receipt of this alarm, Captain Crawford, with his company of 
minutemen, set out immediately for Cambridge, where they 
joined the Worcester County Regiment under the command of 
Colonel Jonathan Warner of Hardwick. On the town records 
there is no list of names of the minutemen, but the following 
names of Oakham men who marched on tlie alarm of April 
19 are on the muster roll of Captain Crawford's company in 
the Massachusetts archives :* 

Captain, John Crawford. 

First Lieutenant, Isaiah Parmenter. 

Second Lieutenant, Alexander Bothwell, 3d. 

Sergeants, George Black, Samuel Metcalf, Benjamin Joslyn, Daniel 
Henderson. 

Corporals, Silas Bullard, James Bell, John Boyd. 

Drummer, Aaron Crawford. 

Privates, Samuel Bell, Joseph Berry, Stewart Black, William Black, 
John Bothwell, William Bothwell, John Butler, George Caswell, Daniel 
Deland, William Harper Dunn, Joseph Eager, Nathan Edson, John 
Forbes, Joel Hayden, James McHerrin, Jacob Parmenter, William 
Stevenson, Isaac Stone, 2d. 

On Sunday, April 23, 1775, the Provincial Congress at Water- 
town resolved that thirteen thousand six hundred men be 
raised by the province for eight months' service. Each company 
was to consist of fifty-nine men, including three officers. A 
week later the Committee of Safety ordered that one-half of 
the militia be sent immediately to Roxbury and Cambridge, and 
that the other half hold themselves in readiness to march at a 
minute's warning. On July 5 it was voted to provide each 
non-commissioned officer and soldier raised under this resolve 
with a bounty coat, or, if he preferred, to allow him its equivalent 
in money. 

In April and May, thirty-five Oakham men enlisted for a 
term of eight months. Ten of the minutemen reenlisted on 
April 27 in the 5th Company (Captain Simeon Hazeltine) 
of the 8th Regiment, commanded by Colonel John Fellows: 

♦Lexington Alarms, Vol. XII, p. 15. 



20 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Joseph Berry, George Black, Stewart Black, William Black, Daniel 
Deland, William Dunn, Joseph Eager, James McHerrin, Jacob 
Parmenter, Isaac Stone, 2d. George Black was made Lieutenant, 
and Stewart Black, Ensign. Daniel Deland was Fifer. Four- 
teen others from Oakham enUsted later in the same company: 
Jacob Ames, Samuel Bullard, James Boyd, Daniel Crawford 
Deland, Stephen Foster, Joseph Gilles, David Henderson, 
Oliver Jackson, Aaron McCobb, Nehemiah Packard, Zephaniah 
Perkins, Asa Snell, Amos Temple, and Joshua Turner. James 
Conant and Luther Conant enlisted at the same time in Captain 
Soul's company of the same regiment. The names of Henderson, 
McCobb, Snell and Temple are not on the Oakham town records. 

Lebbeus Washburn enlisted on May 27 in Captain John Pack- 
ard's company of the 9th Regiment, commanded by Colonel 
David Brewer; George Caswell and James Swinerton of Oakham, 
and William Johnson of New Braintree, whose name is on the 
Oakham town records, joined Captain Grainger's company, in 
Colonel Ebenezer Learned's regiment. 

Silas Bellows, George Dunn, Thomas Gill, Robert Harper, 
Alexander McFarland, Jr., and Kerly Ward enlisted in Captain 
Seth Washburn's company of Colonel Jonathan Ward's regi- 
ment. Kerly Ward was made Corporal. The name of Silas 
Bellows is not on the town records for this campaign. This 
regiment was at the Battle of Bunker Hill, but only a few of 
the companies were actively engaged; Captain Washburn's 
company was one of these. Silas Bellows, George Dunn, 
Alexander McFarland, Jr., and Kerly Ward were in the Battle of 
Bunker Hill, and Kerly Ward was wounded. Thomas Gill and 
Robert Harper did not join the company till fourteen days after 
the battle. 

These eight-months' regiments were encamped at Roxbury 
and formed part of the right wing of the army under General 
Ward that besieged the British in Boston. 

Captain Samuel Dexter of Hardwick raised a company for 
six months' service from Hardwick, New Braintree and Oak- 
ham, which formed part of Colonel Ebenezer Learned's regi- 
ment. Five Oakham men were in this company : Sergeant Isaiah 



THE REVOLUTION 21 

Parmenter, Corporal Timothy Conant, Privates Archibald 
Forbes, Bartholomew Green, Matthew McGilligan (for James 
Dean). This regiment was in camp at Roxbury January i, 1776. 

Thirteen men served two months at Roxbury in the company 
of Captain Barnabas Sears: Sergeant Daniel Parmenter, Pri- 
vates Samuel Stone, James Banks, Sergeant Ebenezer Woodis, 
Privates Sheers Berry, James Blair, James Hunter, Arch Forbes, 
Moses Gilbert, Bartholomew Green, Joseph Green from Rut- 
land, Timothy Conant and Zephaniah Perkins. The last ten 
receipted, February 15, 1776, for ammunition to Captain Sears; 
the names of the others are found on the town records only, 
but these records give no credit to Perkins for this campaign. 

The British evacuated Boston March 17, 1776. April 9 
a resolve was passed to raise eight companies of ninety men 
each "for the defence of Boston," to serve till December i, 
1776. On the pay roll of the company of Captain Ezekiel 
Knowlton of Templeton, dated Dorchester, November 28, 1776, 
are found the names of Sergeant Asa Partridge, Privates George 
Harper, William Parmenter (for Solomon Parmenter) and 
Timothy Shaw (for Thomas White). William Smith of Oak- 
ham enlisted in this company, December 14, 1776, to serve till 
March i, 1777, but he was credited to the town of Barre. 

Early in 1776 measures were taken by the General Court to 
organize and train the militia, that soldiers might be ready to 
respond promptly to calls for reinforcements, especially for the 
Continental Army. By an Act of January 22, the number of 
Worcester County regiments was fixed at eight. On May 14, 
1776, the Fourth Worcester County Regiment was organized 
at Brookfield. Ebenezer Foster of Oakham was chosen Adjutant 
of the regiment. The officers elected for the 8th or Oakham 
company were: 

Captain, John Crawford. 

First Lieutenant, Alexander Bothwell, 3d. 

Second Lieutenant, Asa French. 

These officers received their commissions May 31, 1776, and 
continued in service till the close of the war. 



2 2 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

At a town meeting held May 21, 1776, six weeks before July 
4, the town "Voted without Contradiction that if the Honl. 
Congress should for the Safety of the Colonies declare them 
Independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain, that they [that 
is, the people of Oakham] solemnly engage, with their lives & 
fortunes to support them in the measure." 

The town furnished four men for the Ticonderoga campaign 
but it is not easy to decide just who the men were. John Boyd, 
Benjamin Foster, Joel Hayden and Jacob Parmenter, on July 
29, 1776, were voted £12 bounty from the town for this campaign. 
The names of Hayden and Parmenter are on the town records 
only. Boyd, Foster, and also Stewart Black were enrolled in 
Captain Nathaniel Hamilton's company, which consisted mostly 
of Brookfield men and was in service at Ticonderoga Mills and 
Fort Edward from August 3, 1776, till February i, 1777, in 
Colonel Samuel Brewer's regiment. David Henderson and John 
Harper were enrolled for the same service, in Captain John 
Howard's company of the same regiment, and Daniel Deland 
went in Captain Noah Allen's company of Colonel Asa Whit- 
comb's regiment. Eleven citizens (Isaac Stone, Joseph Hudson, 
James Ames, William Green, Mat. Gait, Ebenezer Foster, James 
Blair, Skelton Foster, Jacob Adams, John Butler and Heman 
Bassett) promised to advance to the Treasurer one hundred and 
sixty dollars "to replace the Money paid by him to the four 
Canady Soldiers who Inlisted in July last as soon as may be."* 

June 25, 1776, it was resolved to raise two thousand men to 
serve in New York till December i, 1776. As far as is known 
to the writer, no muster rolls have been preserved for this, and 
for the following campaign to New York. All names here 
given on these two lists are found on the town records only. In 
addition to the State bounty of £3, a town bounty of £6 each 
was promised to those who should enlist in response to this 
call. The men named below agreed to be responsible for the ten 
soldiers needed for this campaign: Ensign Isaiah Parmenter, 
Captain Jonathan Bullard, Ensign William Banks, Edward 
Partridge, 2d, Silas Partridge, Joseph Craige, George Caswell, 

♦Town Records, Vol. I, pp. 152 ($160), and 171 (£48). 



THE REVOLUTION 23 

James Brown (half a man), John Brown (half a man), Aaron 
Crawford (half a man), William Crawford (half a man), 
Nathaniel Weeks. Ensign Parmenter probably went in charge 
of the men sent on this service. 

Robert Wilson, Alexander Wilson, Jonathan Cunningham, 
Samuel Davis, Isaiah Butler, John Harmon, John Bothwell and 
William Smith agreed to be responsible for eight soldiers to 
be sent to New York for three months' service. The two 
Wilsons, Bothwell and Smith, without doubt, went themselves 
on this campaign. 

On account of the critical situation of the Continental Army 
in New York in September, 1776, one-fifth of all the able-bodied 
men under fifty were called for to serve two months. Lieutenant 
Asa French, with Corporals Samuel Metcalf and William Both- 
well, and Privates Abraham Bell, James Bell, Jr., Silas Bullard, 
Nathan Edson, James Forbes, John Forbes, Benjamin Knight, 
and a recruit, Jacob Brooks, hired by Deacon Allen and Nathan 
Edson, were detailed for this campaign and joined Captain Abner 
How's company of Colonel James Converse's regiment, which 
was in service at Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and North Castle. 
James Banks was detailed to go but did not join the regiment. 
Ichabod Packard also has credit on the town records for this 
campaign. The recently-discovered pay roll of Captain How's 
company made out by Lieutenant French, Commandant, is 
printed among the Addenda in this book, 

Joseph Osborn, Jr., was a soldier and probably lost his life 
in one of these campaigns, as appears from a vote of the town 
April 18, 1777, "that Joseph Osburn's Campagn rate of £3-5-10 
be allowed him for his son Joseph's Service in the war, who is 
now deceased." 

It is not possible to tell in every case whether the man who 
received credit on the town records went himself or secured 
some one to go in his place. There is very little on the town 
records about soldiers until September 19, 1776, when the ques- 
tion was raised about the claims of those who had already 
served. When Captain Crawford received a call for soldiers 
to serve within the state he detailed the men to go, or called for 



24 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

voluntary enlistment. When the service was beyond the limits 
of the state, citizens would sometimes come forward and guar- 
antee to be responsible for the number of men required. Some 
of them would go themselves; some would secure other men to 
go. The committee that made, in 1777, the lists of men who had 
served before the call for Continental soldiers, was "chosen to 
receive and adjust the Claims of the Persons in Town for any 
service done in the present war, whether by themselves or other 
ways." This committee reported March 11, 1777. 

It is probable, also, that some citizens who received credit, 
even on the muster rolls, for militia service in the campaigns 
of 1777 and 1778, were represented in the army by substitutes 
who enlisted under their names. It was considered as credit- 
able for a citizen to send a good man in his place as to go him- 
self, and when the citizen was past middle age, it was better 
for the service. The country was in an unsettled state. There 
was no executive head, and the Continental Congress was often 
not able to pay the soldiers. The Provincial Legislature raised 
money by taxes on the several towns, and no service was more 
important than that of securing the funds necessary to enable 
the town to do its part in the war. It is beyond question also, 
that the citizens who sent substitutes, generally paid them much 
more than the bounty which they themselves received back from 
the town. 

Early in 1777, Massachusetts was called upon by Congress 
to furnish her quota of fifteen battalions for three years' service 
in the Continental Army. Each soldier was to have from the 
province twenty shillings per month and a bounty of £20 in 
addition to the Continental pay. Land bounties were also prom- 
ised to those who enlisted to serve during the war. Oakham 
offered an extra bounty of i20. Some of the nearby towns 
ojffered a bounty of £30, and even £40. One-seventh of all the 
male population not already in the service, of sixteen years of 
age and upwards, were to be taken. Seventeen Oakham men 
in Captain Crawford's company responded to this call ; seven 
enlisted in Captain Reed's company of Colonel Alden's, later 
Colonel Brooks's, 8th Massachusetts Regiment : Sergeant Luther 



THE REVOLUTION 25 

Conant, Corporal Enos Hudson, Privates Israel Hill, Isaac 
Parmenter, James Parmenter, Zephaniah Perkins, Thomas 
Taylor; and ten went in Captain Holden's company of Colonel 
Nixon's 6th Massachusetts Regiment: Sergeant Isaac Stone, 2d, 
Privates Joseph Berry, Sheers Berry, Timothy Conant, Daniel 
Deland, Jabez Fuller, Matthew McGilligan, William Oliver, 
Alpheus Stone and Joshua Whitcomb. The names of Thomas 
Taylor, Timothy Conant, and Joshua Whitcomb are on the 
muster rolls as serving for the town of Oakham, but not on the 
town records. This was the first quota of men furnished for 
three years. The date of the enlistment was March 11, 1777. 
These regiments were actively engaged in the campaign which 
resulted in the surrender of General Burgoyne. Both were 
probably in action in the battles of September 19 and October 7. 

The following men served for the town of Oakham in the 
Continental army, for a term of three years, in other regiments: 
James Conant in Colonel Lee's regiment, Joshua Turner in 
Colonel Henry Jackson's regiment, Richard Sternes in Colonel 
Crane's artillery regiment, William Harper Dunn and John 
Green in Captain Goodale's company of Colonel Rufus Putnam's 
regiment, Jonathan Henderson in Captain Amos Cogswell's 
company, Colonel Wesson's regiment. Of these only Conant, 
Dunn and Henderson have credit on the town records. 

Shubael Wilder, Moses Doty, Elisha Pike and John Wheeler 
engaged for the town of Oakham in Captain Daniel Shay's com- 
pany of Colonel Riifus Putnam's regiment, but the last three 
were without doubt credited to the town of Hardwick where they 
resided. 

In the Massachusetts Spy of July 24, 1777, John Hooker of 
Rutland announces that he "proposes to ride post from Col. 
Nixon's regiment to Boston, once every month, for one year." 
Letters for soldiers in the regiment from their friends in Oakham 
were to be left at Ebenezer Foster's tavern, by the 19th of every 
month. 

Some of the casualties among the Oakham men in the Con- 
tinental army are recorded, but probably not all. Timothy 
Conant died April 15, 1777; Israel Hill was killed August 25, 



26 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

''^777> on the expedition for the relief of Fort Schuyler; 
Zephaniah Perkins was killed September 15, 1777; Jabez Fuller 
died October 16, 1777, probably as a result of wounds received 
in the battle of September 7. Isaac Parmenter was wounded 
in battle with the Indians and Tories and was in the hospital 
several months. He and James Parmenter were taken prisoners 
at Cherry Valley November 11, 1778. Isaac Parmenter was 
kept a prisoner nearly two years, and James Parmenter is sup- 
posed to have died in captivity. 

Israel Hill's bounty of i20 was paid to Widow Beriah Hill 
by vote of the town April 13, 1778. On the same day it was 
voted also to pay to Zephaniah Perkins £20 as town bounty, 
but this was paid to Widow Mary Perkins, who had been 
appointed administratrix of his estate in December, 1777. 

By a resolve passed May i, 1778, gratuities were to be paid 
to all three-year men in the Continental Army who could 
bring certificates that they were in camp before August 15, 
1777. Each non-commissioned officer and private was to 
receive $100. 

Under a call of April 12, 1777, a regiment was raised in 
Worcester, Middlesex, Bristol, and Barnstable Counties to serve 
in Rhode Island from May 5 to July 5, 1777. This regiment 
was commanded by Josiah Whitney and was stationed at North 
Kingston. Oakham furnished six men for the regiment, who 
were placed in the company of Captain Hodges : Corporal 
James Boyd, Privates James Forbes, Robert Forbes, John 
Kenny, Timothy Shaw (for Thomas White), and Nahum 
Whipple. John Kenny and Nahum Whipple have no credit on 
the town records. Robert Forbes's name is found on the town 
records only. 

The muster rolls show that Samuel Bullard and Nehemiah 
Packard served at the Northward in Captain Hodges' company, 
from July 27 to August 29, and the town records give credit 
to Ebenezer Nye for fifteen days in April, on an alarm at 
Williamstown. 

On an alarm at Providence, Captain Crawford marched July 
23, I777> with forty-five men, including officers. The following 



THE REVOLUTION 27 

names are found on the muster roll of Captain Crawford's 
company in this campaign : 

Captain, John Crawford. 

Lieutenant, Alexander Bothwell, 3d. 

Sergeants, Aaron Crawford and William Crawford. 

Corporals, William Bothwell, John Forbes, Benjamin Foster, and 
Samuel Stone. 

Privates, Jacob Adams, Jesse Allen, James Banks, William Banks, 
Heman Bassett, Abraham Bell, James Bell, John Bell, Silas Bellows, 
Alexander Bothwell, 2d, John Bothwell, James Boyd, John Brown, 
Nathaniel Bullard [Bolton], Samuel Bullard, Isaac Bullard, Joseph 
Chaddock, Thomas Chaddock, James Dunbar, Nathan Edson, Charles 
Forbes, James Forbes, George Harper, John Harper, Robert Harper, 
James Hunter, Abraham Joslyn, Nehemiah Packard, Rufus Parmenter, 
Edward Partridge, 2d, Ebenezer Rice, Jonas Rich, Benjamin Spooner, 
William Stevenson, Joshua Turner, William Washburn, and Ebenezer 
Woodis. 



John Boyd also has credit on the town records for this cam- 
paign, and James Bothwell went, at the same time, in Captain 
Whipple's New Braintree company. 

On arriving at Worcester, the company received orders to 
return to Oakham. 

The exposed position of Rhode Island caused the passage of 
a resolve, June 24, 1777, for one thousand five hundred men to 
serve till January 10, 1778. The names of twenty-four Oakham 
soldiers are found on the roll of Captain Ralph Earll's company 
of Colonel Danforth Keyes's regiment: Lieutenant Isaiah Par- 
menter, Sergeant John Forbes, Corporal John Hill, Privates 
Nathan Adams, Jacob Ames, James Ames, William Banks, 
William Black, James Boyd, Isaac Bullard, Archibald Forbes, 
Charles Forbes, James Forbes, Bartholomew Green, Robert Hair, 
Zaccheus Hall, Jr., Benjamin Harper, Joseph Harper, Daniel 
Henderson, John Moore, George Rich, Jonas Rich, Samuel Stone 
and James Upham. Joel Hayden served in Captain Joseph 
Sibley's company of the same regiment. 

William Bothwell, John Boyd and George Harper also have 
credit on the town records for this service. 



28 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

On an alarm at Bennington, August 20, 1777, Captain Craw- 
ford marched with thirty-one men, including officers. The follow- 
ing names are on the muster roll : 

Captain, John Crawford. 

Lieutenant, Alexander Bothwell, 3d. 

Sergeants, William Crawford and Samuel Metcalf. 

Corporal, Benj. Foster. 

Privates, Jesse Allen, William Banks, Silas Bellows, Stewart Black, 
John Bothwell, Asa Briggs, John Brown, Sam^ [James] Brown, 
Jonathan BuUard, Jr., Silas Bullard, Thomas Chaddock, James Conant, 
Skelton Foster, Elijah Gilbert, Robert Harper, James Hunter, Abraham 
Joslyn, IchcCbod Packard, Daniel Parmenter, William Parmenter, Ebenezer 
Rice, Ezra Washburn, William Washburn, Nathaniel Weeks, Thomas 
White, Ebenezer Woodis. 

Isaac Stone also has credit for this service on the town 
records. 

On arriving at Hadley, news was received of the retreat of the 
British from Bennington, and the company was ordered to return 
home. On the town records this is called the campaign to 
Hadley. 

James Blair, James Bell, and Nehemiah Packard received 
from the town £8 each, and Eleazer Spooner £2 los. for a 
campaign to Bennington and Half Moon, in 1777, in Colonel 
Job Cushing's regiment, but the names of Bell and Spooner 
are on the town records only. The first three marched July 30, 
and all served till September 2. 

The critical position of the American forces after the capture 
of Ticonderoga by General Burgoyne caused a resolve, August 
9, 1777, directing that one-sixth of all the able-bodied men not 
in the service should march without delay to reinforce the army 
at the Northward and continue in service till November 30, unless 
sooner discharged. Captain Crawford set out September 7 in 
command of a company of forty men from Hardwick, Oakham 
and New Braintree, and joined Colonel Job Cushing's regiment. 
The Oakham quota consisted of Sergeant Samuel Metcalf, Cor- 
porals James Bothwell and Benjamin Foster, Privates Alexander 
Bothwell, 2d, Asa Briggs, Nathan Edson, Jonathan Glazier, 
John Harper, Daniel Parmenter, and William Washburn. 



—28a— 
Clarence Story Willis. 

Mustered in August 5, 1917. 
Mustered out January 19, 1919. 

Born September i, 1896, in Wallingford, Vt., the son of Leroy Milton 
and Susan Ricker (Eddy) Willis. After the death of her husband on 
May 10, 1909, Mrs. Willis married Gardner Milton Dean of Oakham, Mass. 
on December 12. 1914. Although residing in Northampton when he 
enlisted, Willis was assigned to Oakham since he was under 21 years of 
age and was required to secure the consent of his step-father and mother 
who resided in Oakham. 

Co. I, 104th Infantry, 26th Division, A. E. F. His division was 
the first National Guard Division to go overseas. He took part 
in the engagements of Soissons, Verdun, Apremont, Belleau 
Wood, Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel, Second Marne, and Meuse- 
Argonne. He was gassed on October 28. 1918, and invaHded 
home. His present address is Haydenville, Mass., where he is 
engaged in agriculture. 



[Addendum to "Soldiers of Oakham, Massachusetts, in the great war of 1914-1918".] 



THE REVOLUTION 2Q 

On September 24 Lieutenant Alexander Bothwell, 3d, marched 
to join General Gates at the Northward, with Sergeants Asa 
French and Alexander Wilson, Corporals James Blair and 
James Hunter, Privates Jesse Allen, John Bothwell, Silas Bul- 
lard, Aaron Crawford, Robert Forbes, William Green, Nehemiah 
Packard, and Thomas White, in a company raised in Western 
(Warren) and Oakham, commanded by Captain Joseph Cutler 
of Warren. Nehemiah Packard's name is on the town records 
only^ Ebenezer Nye and Silas Nye served in this campaign 
for Oakham, from September 26 to October 18, in the company 
of Captain Benjamin Nye. 

The army of General Gates was greatly strengthened by the 
troops sent from New England and New York, and after two 
unsuccessful battles (September 19 and October 7) Burgoyne 
was forced to surrender on the 17th of October. Active hos- 
tilities after this time were mostly in the Middle and Southern 
colonies. A part of General Burgoyne's surrendered troops 
were quartered in barracks at Rutland. 

During the next three years several men, in some cases, 
those too old or too young to be liable for service in the field, 
were sent by the town to serve as guards. 

At^ Rutland: Alexander Bothwell, 2d, and John Crawford, 
Jr., m 1778, 1779, and 1780, Jacob Kubler, Marshall Walker 
Archibald Forbes in 1778, James Black, Francis Maynard,' 
Ebenezer Foster in 1779, George Caswell, Alexander Crawford 
Jonathan Forbes, Thomas Gill, Samuel Hunt, in 1780, Daniel 
Deland, one year, beginning January 10, 1781. 

_ At Brookfield: James Blair and James Brown, to guard stores 
in 1778. 

At Castle and Governor's Island: John Crawford, Jr. and 
Alexander Crawford, 2d, for a term of six weeks in 1779.' 

At Boston, Cambridge, Charlestown and Winter Hill: Sergeant 
Nehemiah Allen, Jr., from November 12, 1777, to April 5, 1778. 
Seven other men were sent April i, 1778: Jacob Adams, Wil- 
liam Crawford, Asa Partridge, Silas Partridge, Jacob Kubler, 
John Butler, William Stevenson. Jacob Adams was hired Sep- 
tember 21, 1778, by James Brown and William Bothwell for 



20 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

further service, and probably continued at Boston till November. 
Nathaniel Weeks served from July 22 to December 14, 1778- 

It was determined in June, 1778, to send the prisoners to 
the Southern states, and Corporal James Boyd, with Privates 
Jacob Adams, John Butler, John Crawford, Jr., Benson Dunbar, 
John Forbes, Robert Harper, Reuben McFarland, Samuel Met- 
calf Ebenezer Nye, and Timothy Shaw were detailed by Captain 
Crawford to form a part of the one thousand men who were 
detached from the militia to serve as guards on the march in 
November to Enfield, Connecticut. 

On the 20th of April a resolve was passed to raise two thou- 
sand men to serve in the Continental Army for nine months 
from the time of their arrival at Fishkill. Four men were called 
for, but as the town had not received the credit due for the 
men who had already enlisted, only three were sent: Caleb 
Church, Thomas Darling, and Loved Lincoln. The last was 
hired by the four Bells.* 

Bowman Chaddock, James Shaw, and William Smith also 
served in the Continental Army nine months, from July 10, 
1779, to April 7, 1780. Chaddock and Shaw were in Captain 
Wadsworth's company of Colonel Gamaliel Bradford's regiment. 
The prospect of an attack on Rhode Island led to a call June 
16, 1778, for five hundred and fifty-four men to be forwarded 
without delay to the headquarters of General Sullivan and to 
serve till the force previously ordered should be available, but 
the term was not to exceed twenty-one days. The names of 
Lieutenant Alexander Bothwell, 3d, Privates Alexander Bothwell, 
2d, Benjamin Harper, Joseph Harper, Marshall Walker, and Rob- 
ert Wilson are found on the rolls of Captain Gilbert's company 
of Colonel Josiah Whitney's regiment in this campaign. The 
names of Jesse Allen, Jonathan Bullard, Jr., Reuben McFarland, 
Benjamin Perkins and Eleazer Spooner are on the town records 
for six weeks' service in Rhode Island, but do not appear on 
the muster rolls. Stephen Lincoln was sent to Rhode Island 
to serve for six months from August, 1778. June 29, 1779, 
Benjamin Dunbar and James Dunbar enlisted for six months 

*Town Records, Vol. I, p. 190. 



THE REVOLUTION 31 

in Captain Fisher's company, Colonel Nathan Tyler's regiment, 
for a campaign in Rhode Island. James Blair served as 
Sergeant in Captain Gilbert's company of Colonel Whitney's 
regiment, from August 2 to September 13, 1780. 

Jacob Adams, John Butler, Ebenezer Nye, John Boyd, George 
Harper, Asa Partridge, David Shaw, and Thomas White enlisted 
October 14, 1779, to serve three months at Claverack-on-the- 
Hudson, in response to an urgent call from the Commander-in- 
Chief for two thousand men to reinforce the army there. The 
last five received £13 each mileage money and £30 as bounty, 
and were attached to Captain Joseph Richardson's company in 
Colonel Samuel Denny's regiment. 

June 5, 1780, a resolve was passed to raise three thousand 
nine hundred and sixty-four men to serve in the Continental 
Army for six months from the time of their arrival at the place 
of rendezvous. In response to this call, the town sent ten men: 
Elias Bolton, Archibald Forbes, Thomas Gill, Benjamin Harper, 
John Harper, Joseph Harper, John Hitchcock, Leavitt Perkins, 
Jonas Rich, and Joseph F. Thompson. 

There was a call during the same month for nine militiamen 
for three months' service at West Point. The men raised to 
meet this call were: Corporals James Boyd and William Wash- 
burn, Privates Sheers Berry, Apollos Bolton, John Crawford, 
Jr., Josiah S. Nye, James Shaw, James Shaw, Jr., and a recruit 
hired by Nehimiah Allen, whose name appears to be Ignatos 
Adams. They were enlisted July 5, and discharged October 10, 
and were in Captain Timothy Paige's company of Colonel John 
Rand's regiment. 

December 2, 1780, another resolve was passed to raise four 
thousand two hundred and forty men for the Continental Army, 
for three years or during the war. The town offered a bounty 
of three hundred silver dollars to each man who should enlist 
in this campaign. The amount paid in bounties was to be cred- 
ited to the town on the next State tax. The citizens were divided 
into seven "classes," and each class was obliged to secure one 
man. The men engaged were : Benjamin Harper, Thomas 
Gill, George Perkins, George Walls, James Bigelow, Leavitt 
Perkins and Jonas Rich, the last hired by Joseph Chaddock. 



32 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Ebenezer Whitman enlisted August i8, 1781, for a term of 
five months in Rhode Island but was discharged November 17. 
He Vvras in Captain Joseph Elliot's company of Colonel William 
Turner's regiment. 

June 30, 1 78 1, a call was issued for two thousand seven 
hundred militiamen for three months, for temporary reinforce- 
ment of the Continental Army at West Point. Four men were 
called for from Oakham, and Nehemiah Allen, Jr., James Boyd, 
James Forbes and Robert Harper were sent. All marched 
August Q.'j, 1 78 1, joined Colonel Luke Drury's regiment at West 
Point September 3, and were discharged December 3, 1781. 

CornwalHs surrendered his whole army of seven thousand men 
at Yorktown October 19, 1781, and no further soldiers were 
called for from this town. 

The town not only paid large bounties to its Continental 
soldiers, but in some cases guaranteed their wages. It was 
required also to provide them with clothing and to supply 
their families with provisions while they were in the service. 
During the last years of the war it was called upon to furnish 
the Continental Anny with beef, and also with horses. The 
money for all these expenses was secured without borrowing 
from any person out of town. Some of the money raised for 
the benefit of the Continental soldiers was paid back by the 
State. In 1786 the town was able to settle a minister, and after 
advancing him nearly enough on his settlement to pay for a 
farm, it was soon out of debt and had money in the treasury. 
We cannot praise too highly the wisdom of the men who man- 
aged the financial affairs of the town during this long period of 
hardship and disaster. 

The following citizens held the important town offices during 
the nine years 1775-1783, inclusive: 

TOWN CLERKS 

Joseph Craige, 1775. William Crawford, 1779, 1781, 1782, 

Isaac Stone, 1776, 1777. 1783. 

Spencer Field, 1778. William Green, 1780. 



THE REVOLUTION 
SELECTMEN 

Ebenezer Foster. 1776, 1780, 1782, James Dean, 1779. 1780 

TuJ \i^ru- William Green, 1778, 1779. 

Th6mas White, 1775. 1776, 1777, Joseph Hudson, 1775, I777. 

T ^^?;, „ Ebenezer Nye, 1782, 1783. 

Jesse Allen, 1775, 1778. 1779. Isaiah Parmenter, 1778, 1779 

Joseph Craige, 1776, 1777, 1780. John Boyd 1781 

William Crawford, 1781, 1782, 1783. Joseph Chaddock, 1778 

Asa French, 1777. 1782, 1783. Samuel Davis 1783 

James Ames 1780. 1781. Daniel Parmenter, 1781. 

Wilham Banks, 1774. 1776. Asa Partridge 1778 

Jonathan Bullard, 1777, 1780. Isaac Stone, 1775. 
John Crawford, 1775, 1781. 

TREASURERS 

Joseph Craige, 1775, 1776, I777, James Brown. 1781 (after the death 
, ''{^' '78i- of Joseph Craige). 

Jesse Allen, 1779, 1780. Jonathan Bullard, 1782. 

Joseph Hudson, 1783. 

COMMITTEE OF CORRESPONDENCE, INSPECTION, AND SAFETY 

Jesse Allen, 1775, 1776, 1782, 1783. Jonathan Fitts, 1776. 

James Brown, 1777, 1779, 1782, William Green, 1777. 

^^^' James Hunter, 1779. 

Joseph Chaddock, 1779, 1782, 1783. Benjamin Joslyn, 1775 

Isaac Stone, 1775, 1776, 1777- Samuel Metcalf, 1775. 

Ebenezer Woodis, 1778, 1779, i/Si. Ebenezer Nye 1779 

Jonathan Bullard, 1775, 1776. Daniel Parmenter, '1780 

Joseph Hudson, 177S, 1776. Isaiah Parmenter, 1777 

Francis lAIaynard, 1780, 1781. Solomon Parmenter, 1780 

Thomas White, 1775, 1776. Asa Partridge, 1775 

James Ames, 1775. Edward Partridge, 1780. 

George Black, 1776. Edmund Reed, 1781 

Joseph Craige, 177S. William Smith, 1780. 

John Crawford, 1777. Alexander Wilson. 1778 
Samuel Davis, 1778. 

Jesse Allen, James Brown and Joseph Chaddock were continued as a 
Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety during the three 
years (1784, 1785, 1786) following the close of the war 



33 



CHIEF AUTHORITIES 

Oakham and Rutland Town Records. 

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War. 

Revolutionary War Records, Bureau of Pensions. 

Vital Records of Oakham and several other Massachusetts Towrns. 

United States Census (1790), Heads of Families in Massachusetts, Maine, 

Vermont and Connecticut. 
Worcester County Records: Probate Court, Registry of Deeds, Court 

of Sessions. 
Massachusetts Spy (sometimes printed as Worcester Magasine) . 
The Crawford Family of Oakham, by William Crawford. 
Biography of Deacon James Allen of Oakham, by Hiram Knight. 
Stephen Lincoln of Oakham, His Ancestry and Descendants, by John E. 

Morris. 
The Ancestry of Lydia Foster, Wife of Stephen Lincoln, by John E. 

Morris. 
The Fobes Memorial Library, by Henry P. Wright. 
MS. Records of the Oakham and Rutland Congregational Churches. 

MS. Notes by Rev. J. Dana of Barre, Mass., who was clerk of the 
Congregational Church in Oakham from its organization in 1773 till 
1779- 

MS. Notes (chiefly marriages) by Rev. Daniel Tomlinson, minister of the 
Congregational Church in Oakham from 1786 till 1829. 

MS. Notes (chiefly a record of deaths) by John Robinson. 

Town Histories of Bridgewater (Mitchell), Hardwick (Paige), Middle- 
boro (Weston), North Brookfield (Temple), Rutland (Reed), Spen- 
cer (Draper) and Watertown (Bond). 

Family Histories: Conant (F. O. Conant), Field (Pierce), Macomber 
(Stackpole), Nye (D. F. Nye), Whitman (Farnam). 

ABBREVIATIONS 

M. S. R. = Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War. 

(Figure in parenthesis after M. S. R. page number, denotes entry from 

top of page.) 
T. R. = Town Records. 
V. R. = Vital Records. 



1254245 

SOLDIERS IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 



Jacob Adams. 

Served in five campaigns : ( i ) on the alarm at Rhode Island, 
July 23, 1777; (2) in the defence of Boston beginning April 
I, 1778; (3) further service in the defence of Boston, in 1778, 
for which he was hired by James Brown and William Bothwell ; 

(4) fifteen days with the company that guarded Burgoyne's 
troops on their march from Rutland to Enfield, Conn., in 1778; 

(5) three months at Claverack in 1779. 

Jacob Adams had a farm of eighty-five acres, fifteen of which 
were on East Hill, above the Clampherd Meadow, and south 
of the farm of Joseph Osborn. His wife was named Lydia. 
He had children, but no record of them has been found. Febru- 
ary 15, 1805, he gave up to John Glazier a warrantee deed of his 
farm, the said Glazier agreeing "to maintain and support him 
and his wife during their natural lives, to provide for them a 
comfortable house on the premises, and a sufficient supply of 
firewood cut fit for the fire and brought into the house, and to 
provide and deliver to them eleven bushels of Indian meal and 
five bushels of rye meal, eleven score of good pork yearly, and 
to keep one cow summer and winter for their use, and to care 
for them both in health and sickness." He resided in Oakham 
till his death November 27, 1809. His widow died June 20, 181 1. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 190, 214. M. S. R., i, 49 (2), (4). Oakham V. R., 
III. John Robinson's notes. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, clviii, 581, clix, 417. 



Nathan Adams. 

Enlisted from Oakham, July 10, 1777, in Capt. Earll's Co., 
Col. Keyes's Regt., for the term of six months, and was dis- 
charged January 4, 1778, service, five months, twenty-five days. 



36 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Nathan Adams was the son of Nathan Adams of Medway, 
and, March 3, 1774, received from his father one hundred acres 
in the southeasterly corner of Barre and in the southwesterly 
part of Hubbardston. He had already purchased, September 7, 
1770, "from John Hucker" (Hooker) of Rutland, for £60, eighty 
acres in Barre, in Great Farm No. 7. A part of his land was 
just across the Rutland line and not far from the Craige farms. 

M. S. R., i, 64 (10). Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxiii, 105, 150. 

John Alden. 

Enlisted June 10, 1777, for three years for the town of Temple- 
ton, in Capt. Gardner's Co., Col. Putnam's Regt. Descriptive 
list taken November 20, 1780: age 30, stature 5 feet 9, com- 
plexion dark, hair dark, residence Oakham. 

John Alden came to Oakham from Suffield, Conn. He married 
Prudence Butler, October 11, 1774. A son, Nathaniel Butler, was 
born in Oakham, November 15, 1778. 

M. S. R., i, 108 (7), III (16) [Aldin], 132 (15) [Alld'in]. Oakham 
V. R., 9, 55. 

Jesse Allen. 

Born in Bridgewater in 1744, son of James Allen, grandson of 
Nathaniel Allen, and great-grandson of Samuel Allen, of Braintree. 

He marched in Capt. John Crawford's Co., Col. James Con- 
verse's Regt., (i) on the alarm at Rhode Island, July 23, 1777, 
and (2) on the alarm at Bennington, August 20, 1777. He 
enlisted also, September 24, 1777, in Capt. Joseph Cutler's com- 
pany of volunteers and marched to join General Gates at the 
Northward, service twenty-four days. In addition he has credit 
on the town records for six weeks in Rhode Island, in 1778. 

Jesse Allen came to Oakham from Bridgewater in 1770, and 
purchased the farm owned by the late Lewis N. Haskell. He 
was seventeen times Assessor, twenty-two times Moderator, nine- 
teen times Selectman, ten times Treasurer of the Town, seven 
times a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 37 

and Safety ; was Deacon of the Congregational Church from its 
origin in 1773 till his death, a period of forty-three years; was 
member of the Massachusetts Legislature in 1805, and Justice 
of the Peace from 1802 till his death, April 11, 1816, 

Jesse Allen was married to Abigail, daughter of Dr. Stoughton 
Willis, in 1768. Children, all born in Oakham: Olive, October 
26, 1770, died April 11, 1805; Parnal, November 7, 1772, mar- 
ried Timothy Nye of Oakham; Lucinda, December 25, 1774; 
Hannah, February 7, 1777, married in 1805, Capt. Benjamin 
Little of New Braintree; Cloe, August lo, 1779, married (i) 
Jonas Leonard of Oakham, (2) Rev. Gains Conant; Abigail, 
July 12, 1784, married (i) Dr. Seth Fobes of Oakham, (2) Rev. 
Abraham Gushee of Dighton; Lucy, January 6, 1788, married 
Col. Henry Penniman of New Braintree; James, July 2, 1792, 
married (i) Polly L. Crocker of Paxton, (2) Hannah H. Parker 
of Dunbarton, N. H. 

Oakham T. R, i, 187, 188, 189. M. S. R., i, 161 (i), (2). Oakham 
V. R., 9, 10, 56, 65, III. New Braintree V. R., 33, 100. Mitchell, Hist, of 
Bridgewater, 94, 95, 237. Knight, Biog. of Dea. James Allen, 9, 10, 38 
[Parnal, Dec. 25, should be Nov. 7]. Spy, June 19, 1805. John Robin- 
son's Notes. Dighton Town Clerk's Records. 

Nehemiah Allen, Jr. 

Born in Middleboro, March 12, 1765, son of Captain Nehemiah and Abi- 
gail (Thomas) Allen. The father, Captain Nehemiah Allen, was brother 
of Deacon Jesse Allen and was born in Bridgewater, December 10, 1733; 
removed to Middleboro before 1758 and remained there till April, 1778, 
when he came to Oakham and purchased from William Banks the farm 
in Lot No. 32, on which he lived till his death, December 28, 1799. Before 
coming to Oakham in 1778 he had served in the Revolution as captain 
of the Third Company of the Fourth Plymouth County Regiment, being 
in the field for four months, in the fall and early winter of both the years 
1776 and 1777, on campaigns in Rhode Island. He later received credit 
on his assessment for taxes in Oakham for this Middleboro service. He 
served the town as Moderator in 1783 and as Selectman in 1787. 

Children, the first five born at Middleboro: Lois, April 10, 1759; Mary, 
September 22, 1760; Abiah, February 24, 1763; Nehemiah, Jr. (see above) ; 
Susanna, May 2, 1767; Bathshebe, July 16, 1769; Jedediah, January 28, 
1774; Washington, February 16, 1776. 



38 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Nehemiah Allen, Jr., served from August 27, 1781, to Novem- 
ber 7, 1 78 1, in Captain Cutler's Company at West Point. 

He removed to Pawlet, Vermont, after 1790 and lived alter- 
nately there and in Granville, N. Y. He was in Rochester, N. Y., 
when the present site of that city was offered him for one shilling 
per acre. He died in 1852, aged 87. 

In 1787 he was married to Moley Bothwell, who died in 1841, 
aged 73. Children: Lucy, born in 1796; Jane, born in 1800. 

Oakham T. R., i, 184, 202, 252, 280, ii, 11, 51, 116. M. S. R., i, 178 (13), 
179 (3)- Oakham V. R., 56, 65, iii, 116, 128. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridge- 
water, 95. Mayflower Descendant, xvi, 41. Weston, Hist, of Middleboro, 
200. Middleboro Town Clerk's Records. Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, 
ii, 84, 96. Conant Family, 259, 260. Nye Genealogy, 232. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, January 7, 1800. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxix, 316. 
Hollister, Hist, of Pawlet, Vt., 158, 255, 256. Family Bible of Washington 
Allen in the possession of Mrs. H. H. Lawrence, of Westboro. 



Jacob Ames. 

Enlisted soon after the Battle of Bunker Hill, with other 
Oakham men, for a term of eight months, in Capt. Hazeltine's 
(5th) Co., Col. Fellows' (8th) Regt., and served at Roxbury. 
He reenlisted August 10, 1777, in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Dan- 
forth Keyes's Regt., for service in Rhode Island, from which he 
was discharged January 4, 1778. 

Jacob Ames was probably nephew of James Ames. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., i, 218 (5), v, 141 (13) [Fames]. 

James Ames. 

Served in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., from August 
27, 1777, to January 4, 1778, four months and eight days, in a 
campaign at Providence. 

He was by trade a blacksmith. In 1770 he purchased of George 
Harper, for £zZ7 6s. 8d., one hundred and forty-nine acres, one 
hundred and forty rods, lying on both sides of the county 
road leading from New Braintree to Worcester, and extending 
from the College Lot on the east beyond the town road on the 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 39 

west; also a pew in the meeting-house "betwixt the east door 
and women's stairs." The farm was later owned by Governor 
Levi Lincoln and was a part of his "Oakham farm." James 
Ames kept an inn here from 1776, and perhaps earlier, to 1783. 
He was Selectman of Oakham in 1780 and 1781, and member of 
the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1775. 
December 8, 1761 he married Elizabeth Hall. Five of their 
children were born in Oakham : Hannah, February 16, 1771 ; 
Abner Craft, May 31, 1773; James, February 22, 1775; Lucy, 
December 3, 1777; Elizabeth, June 5, 1779. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., i, 218 (14). Oakham V. R., 10, 11. 
Rutland V. R., 108. Records, Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, 1777-1783. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixiii, 250. 



James Banks. 

Born September 19, 1751, O. S., son of William and Azubah (MeMains) 
Banks. He was the first boy born in Oakham. 

James Banks served at Roxbury two months in 1776, and went 
with Capt. Crawford on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 
In 1776 he was detailed by Capt. Crawford to go under Lieut. 
Asa French in Capt. Abner How's Co. to Horse Neck, but 
did not join the regiment. 

In 1774 he married Martha White of Warren. The same year 
he purchased of his father, for £120, sixty-four acres in the 
southeasterly part of Lot No. 29, which he sold in 1778 to John 
Moore, and his name has not been found later in the registry of 
deeds. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., i, 577 (u) [Bankes], 578 (4)- Oak- 
ham V. R., II. Warren V. R., 76. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds. Ixxix, 
147, Ixxx, 404. 

William Banks. 

Enlisted as Private in Capt. Ralph Earll's company to serve at 
Providence from July 2, 1777, to January 4, 1778. Before joining 



40 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

the company, he marched, July 23, 1777, on the Rhode Island 
alarm, and August 20, 1777, on the Bennington alarm. He has 
credit also on the town records for five months' service in New 
York. 

William Banks was one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. 
In 1756 he purchased from Robert McMains, his father-in-law, 
for £200, seventy-three acres, being one-half of three-sevenths 
of Lot No. 32. He lived with his father-in-law in a house on 
this lot and purchased more land during the next twenty years. 
In 1778 he sold one hundred and eighty acres to Nehemiah 
Allen. He was Assessor in 1764, Warden in 1764, and six times 
Selectman. 

He was married to Azubah, daughter of Robert McMains, 
June 7, 1750. Children, all born in Oakham: James, September 
19, 1751, O. S. ; Mary, September 28, 1756, O. S. ; William, 
February 29, 1760; EHzabeth, December 13, 1761 ; Sarah, 
February 27, 1766; Noble, October 26, 1767; Ann, September 
9. 1771- 

Oakham T. R, i, 168. M. S. R., i, 577 (14), (i5)' [Bankes], 579 (8), 
(9). Oakham V. R., 11. Rutland V. R., no. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
xxxvii, 185, Ixxix, 316. 

Heman Bassett. 

Marched in Capt. John Crawford's company on the alarm at 
Rhode Island, July 23, 1777. 

He came to Oakham before 1776. In 1780 he purchased of 
Jonathan Bullard, for £52 5s. lawful silver money, twenty-eight 
acres in the southwesterly corner of Lot No. 13. He was chosen 
Chorister at a church meeting held December 18, 1782, and 
was Selectman of Oakham in 1787. Sometime after 1790 he 
removed to Guildhall, Vt., from which place he wrote a letter 
to Father Tomlinson, January 8, 1810, which is still preserved. 

In 1776 he married Abigail, daughter of Isaac and Martha 
(Munroe) Stone. Children, born in Oakham: Patty, April 29, 
1777; William, April 7, 1779; Joel, October 29, 1781 ; Heman, 
February 7, 1785; Roxena, April 27, 1787. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 41 

Oakham T. R., i, 146, 187. M. S. R., i, 753 (8) [Basset]. Oakham 
V. R., 12, 47, 58. Oakham Church Records, i, 6. U. S. Census (1790), 
Mass., 230. MS. Letter of Heman Bassett, Jan. 8, 1810, in possession of 
H. P. Wright. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxviii, 64. 



William Batt. 

Enlisted August 9, 1781, for three months, for the town of 
Barre, in Capt. Jonathan Sibley's Co., Col. Drury's Regt. Dis- 
charged November 21, 1781, service, three months and thirteen 
days. 

William Batt, an Englishman, was a wool comber and a 
tailor. He came to Oakham from Barre before 1790. July i, 
1795, he purchased from Asa Perkins of Ludlow, for iio, ten 
acres of upland, with all the buildings thereon, on the slope 
of the hill on the south side of the road that leads from the 
village to the Page Austin place. His name is preserved in 
Batt Hill and Batt Brook. 

October 24, 1780, he married Elizabeth Correy of Oakham. 

M. S. R., i, 809 (3). Oakham V. R., 63 [Butt]. Barre V. R., 119 
[Butts]. New Braintree V. R., 68. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, cxxiii, 481. « 



The Bell Family. 

James Bell was born in Belegaley, in the county of Tyrone 
and kingdom of Ireland, in the year 1706. At an early age he 
came to America and settled in Rutland, from which place he 
removed to Oakham in 1749, being one of the first ten settlers. 
In 1745 he purchased for £160, one hundred acres in Lot No. 30, 
on which he and his descendants lived for more than a hundred 
years. He was Warden in 1762, Assessor in 1764, and Selectman 
in 1760 and 1764. 

May 24, 1733, he was married to Martha Crawford (born 
1706), eldest daughter of Aaron and Agnes (Wilson) Crawford. 
Their children were seven sons and four daughters. 



42 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

James Bell died March 25, 1793, in the eighty-eighth year of 
his age. His wife died September 20, 1795, at the age of 
eighty-nine. 

Gravestone Record in Old Cemetery at Oakham. Oakham V. R., 112. 
Rutland V. R., 113. Crawford Family of Oakham, 7, 8 [Sept. 20:= Dec. 
20]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xx, 441. 

Abraham Bell. 

Enlisted in the summer of 1776 for two months' service with 
Lieut. Asa French at Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and North Castle 
and marched on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 

He was fifth son of James Bell, was married to Miss Joslyn 
of New Braintree, and settled in Murrayfield (now Chester). 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187. M. S. R., i, 907 (12). Crawford Family 
of Oakham, 9. Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

James Bell, Jr. 

Marched with Capt. Crawford as Corporal in the Oakham 
company of minutemen on April 19, 1775. In the summer of 
1776 he enlisted for a term of two months with Lieut. Asa 
French, at Dobbs Feri-y, Tarrytown and North Castle. He went 
also with the Oakham company on the Rhode Island alarm, 
July 23, 1777, and in a campaign to Bennington in August, 1777. 

He was the second son of James Bell, and was born in 1744. 
In 1792 he was married to Anna Osborn, daughter of Joseph 
and Jennett (Hodge) Osborn, who was baptized in Hopkinton, 
July 27, 1760. They had four children, born in Oakham: 
Melinda, September 24, 1794; Polly Davis, February 15, 1796; 
Patty Crawford, January 7, 1798; Anna Osborn, August 24, 
1800. 

Polly Bell married Walter McFarland, May 27, 1817, and 
Patty Bell married Daniel McFarland, May 19, 1817. After 
residing in Oakham for a short time, these two families settled 
in the town of Stark, New Hampshire. 

James Bell died July 17, 181 1, aged sixty-seven, and the inven- 
tory of his estate was filed October 22, 181 1. His widow, Anna 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 43 

Osborn Bell, died March i, 1850. Her funeral sermon, preached 
by Rev. James Kimball, is still preserved. 

Oakham T. R, i, 168, 188. AI. S. R., i, 909 (9), (lo). Oakham V. R., 
12, 58, 86, 112. Hopkinton V. R., 144 [Ozborn], 336 [Orsborn]. Oakham 
Town Clerk's Records. Crawford Family of Oakham, 8. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, Oct. 22, 181 1. Paj^ Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 



John Bell 

Marched in Capt. Crawford's company on the alarm at 
Rhode Island, July 23, 1777. 

He was the third son of James Bell, and was married to 
Hannah White of Western (now Warren) in 1776, and settled 
in Murrayfield (now Chester), 

Oakham T. R., i, 1S7. M. S. R., i, 910 (5). Crawford Family of 
Oakham, 8. 

Samuel Bell. 

Was Private in Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen who 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775. 

He was the sixth son of James Bell. June 22, 1780, he married 
Miss Elizabeth Campbell of Murrayfield (now Chester), and 
lived in that place. 

M. S. R., i, 911 (6). Crawford Family of Oakham, 9. 



Silas Bellows. 

Private in Capt. Seth Washburn's Co., Col. Ward's Regt. ; en- 
listed May 10, 1775, for the term of eight months in the siege of 
Boston. He also marched on the Rhode Island and Bennington 
alarms in 1777, and probably served as Sergeant in Capt. John 
Howard's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., in 1776 and 1777. 

His daughter Lissy was baptized in Oakham by Rev. J. Dana, 
November 12, 1775. 

M. S. R., i, 916 (9), (ro), 918 (8) [Belows]. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. 



44 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Joseph Berry. 

Born in Rutland, December 29, 1752, son of Sheers and Esther 
(Woodward) Berry. 

Joseph Berry was one of the Oakham minutemen in Capt. 
Crawford's company who marched on the Lexington alarm. 
April 27, while still at Roxbury, he reenlisted in Capt. Hazeltine's 
company of men raised in the towns of Hardwick, New Brain- 
tree, and Oakham, for the siege of Boston, and was entitled to 
a bounty coat or its equivalent in money, as is shown by a state- 
ment dated at Hardwick November 2, 1775. On March 11, 
1777, he enlisted for a term of three years in the Continental 
Army, in the same regiment and company with his father. He 
was claimed by Rutland, the place of his birth ; but a committee 
for settling disputes between towns as to soldiers claimed by 
them, sitting at Barre, June 25, 1778, credited him to Oakham. 
He was reported sick in hospital in July, 1779, but returned to 
duty the following month. He was discharged March 11, 1780. 

He was married August 5, 1782, to Sarah Powers. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165, 171. M. S. R., i, 704 (6) [Barry], 994 (8), (12). 
Oakham V. R., 12. New Braintree V. R., 69. 



Sheers Berry. 

Enlisted for a campaign of two months at Roxbury In the 
early part of 1776, and receipted for ammunition to Capt. 
Barnabas Sears, on February 15. March 11, 1777, he enlisted 
in the Continental Army for the term of three years, in Capt. 
Abel Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt. After his discharge from 
the Continental Army, he reenlisted on July 5, 1780, for a three 
months' campaign at West Point, from which he was discharged 
October 10, 1780. 

Sheers Berry's name appears on the Rutland town records in 
I750> when he was chosen Field Driver. His wife joined the 
church in Rutland, March 8, 1752. In 1759, he enlisted, at the 
age of thirty-three, "in his Majesty's service within the Province 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 45 

of Massachusetts Bay in the Regiment whereof Tim° Ruggles, 
Esq., is Colonel, for the invasion of Canada." 

He came from Rutland to Oakham in 1765, and was "warned 
out" by the Selectmen, not because they had anything against 
him, but on account of their unpleasant experience with the 
Widow Gordon, who became a town pauper after having lived 
in Oakham a very short time. For many years he lived on the 
farm owned by the late James S. Foster. 

He was married in Rutland, June 15, 1750, to Esther Wood- 
ward of Holden, and had eight children, the first five born in 
Rutland: Eunice, June 22, 1751 ; Joseph, December 29, 1752; 
Ephraim, November 25, 1754; Esther, December 5, 1757; Lydia, 
September 8, 1760; John, April 4, 1772; Woodward, September 
2, 1774; Benjamin, baptized August 17, 1777. 

Sheers Berry was living in Oakham in 1790, but died before 
October 8, 1800, when his wife is called "Widow Esther Berry" 
in the Spy. 

Oakham T. R., i, 36, 165, 171, 199, 252. Rutland T. R., March 4, 1750. 
Mass. Muster Rolls, 1759. M. S. R., i, 997 (3). Oakham V. R., 12 
[Beary]. Rutland V. R., 15, 114. Rutland Church Records, March 8, 
1752. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. 
Spy, Oct. 8, 1800. 

James Bigelow. 

Enlisted for three years in the Continental Army for the town 
of Oakham; descriptive list taken April 28, 1781 ; age 18, stature 
5 feet 4, complexion dark, occupation blacksmith, residence 
Oakham. 

M. S. R., ii, 25 (10). 

The Black Family. 

Abraham Black came from Rutland, and in 1758 purchased 
of Aaron Estabrook, of Chelmsford, for £5, forty and one-half 
acres in Lot BB. He was Selectman of Oakham in 1765. 

April 18, 1753, he was married, in Rutland, to Mary, daughter 
of John and Grace Mclntyre. Though the family records are 



46 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

not preserved, he was probably the father of George, James, 
Stewart, and William Black, who were soldiers in the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

Rutland V. R., 115. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xxxviii, 479. 

George Black. 

Was Sergeant in Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen who 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775. On May i, 1775, he 
reenlisted for eight months in Capt. Simeon Hazeltine's company, 
which served at Roxbury. He was appointed Lieutenant in that 
company, and received his commission June 7, 1775. 

He was on the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and 
Safety in 1776. 

May 19, 1774, he married Bethiah Allen, daughter of James 
Allen, of Bridgewater, and sister of Deacon Jesse Allen, of 
Oakham. Mrs. Bethiah Allen Black died April 19, 1836, aged 
eighty-six years. Her daughter, Bethiah Black, died September 
29, 1873. Lieut. George Black lived on the farm owned by the 
late Reuben Dean. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., ii, 94 (10), 128 (3) [Blake]. Oakham 
V. R., 59 [Blake], 112. Oakham Town Clerk's Records. Mitchell, Hist, 
of Bridgewater, 95. 

James Black. 

Private in Capt. Joseph Livermore's company; enlisted July 
3, 1779, for a term of three months with guards at Rutland, and 
was discharged October 4, 1779. 

In 1775 he was married to the Widow Rebeckah Lyon. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215. M. S. R, ii, 96 (2). Oakham V. R., 59. 

Stewart Black. 

Private in Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775, and Ensign in Capt. 
Hazeltine's company, in which he reenlisted April 27, 1775, for 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 47 

a term of eight months. He served also under Capt. Nathan 
Hamilton from August 3 to September 30, 1776, in the company 
sent to Ticonderoga and Fort Edward, and marched with the 
Oakham company on the Bennington alarm, August 20, 1777. 

He married Anna, daughter of Aaron and Jean (Craige) 
Parmenter, in 1778. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., ii, 100 (5), (6), 137 (2), (3) [Blake]. 
Oakham V. R., 41, 59. 

William Black. 

Marched with Capt. John Crawford's company of minutemen 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, and was one of those 
who, before the minutemen were discharged, reenlisted in Capt. 
Hazeltine's company, on April 27, for a term of eight months, 
and was entitled to a bounty coat or its equivalent in money. 
July 2, 1777, he reenlisted in Capt. Ralph Earll's company and 
served six months at Providence. In 1779 he enlisted in the 
Continental Army for three years for the town of Northfield, 
giving his residence as Oakham. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., ii, 100 (10), 138 (2), (3), (6) [Blake]. 



James Blair. 

Son of James Blair, who was born in Scotland, went at the age of 
five with his parents to Ireland, and two years later came to America. 
The father was a coachman and married an English girl named Pepper. 
Three sons, James, Asa, and Joseph, served in the War of the Revolu- 
tion. Asa died as a result of wounds received in the battle of White 
Plains. 

James Blair served as Private for a term of two months at 
Roxbury under Capt. Barnabas Sears, and again in a campaign 
to Bennington and Half IVIoon in August, 1777. He was Cor- 
poral in Capt. Joseph Cutler's company of volunteers, which 
marched to join General Gates at the Northward, September 24, 
1777. On July 9, 1778, he was sent to guard stores at Brookfield. 
In 1780 he served as Sergeant in Col. Whitney's Regt. in Rhode 
Island. 



40 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

April i6, 1776, he purchased of Benjamin Joslyn, for £293, 
one hundred and ten acres on the road leading from George 
Black's to Silas Frost's in New Braintree; this was the Charles 
Keith place. Mr. Blair was one of the early signers of the church 
covenant, but was not in town in 1773 when the Congregational 
Church was organized. 

He married Sarah Joslyn of New Braintree, April 26, 1770. 
Children: Lucy, born June 24, 1771 ; Sally, born November 27, 
1772; Katey, born November 18, 1774; Joseph, born April 10, 
1777; Asa, born May 13, 1780; James, born November 4, 1782; 
Polly, born December 10, 1784; Hosea, born August 3, 1787. 

November 22, 1793, Sally Blair married George Black, 2d, and 
in 1800 was living in Wardsboro, Vt. George Black, 2d, died 
November 24, 1810, at Watervliet, N. Y. His widow, Sally Blair 
Black, died October 23, 1863, near Castle Creek, N. Y. 

After the death of his first wife, James Blair married, Decem- 
ber 23, 1799, Annie Hagar, widow of Isaac Hagar, and removed 
to the Wilbur place, which had been given her by her father, 
Capt. Jonathan Bullard. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., ii, 118 (8), (9), (10), (11), (12). Oak- 
ham V. R., 12, 59. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. New Braintree V. R., 69. 
Oakham Chm'ch Records, i, i, 3. /. A. Young, Genealogical Notes, Part 
II, I, 3. Recollections of Mrs. Horace Wilbur. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
Ixxix, 438. 

Apollos Bolton. 

Has credit on the town records for service in a three months' 
campaign at West Point, from July 5 to October 10, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 252. 

Elias Bolton. 

Enlisted July 6, 1780, in the Continental Army for a term of 
six months ; age 18, stature 5 feet 9, complexion light. In the 
fall of 1780, he was Fife Major in Col. Gamaliel Bradford's 
regiment. He was discharged December 11, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 251. M. S. R., ii, 249 (9). 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 49 

Nathaniel Bolton, Jr. 

Probably son of Nathaniel and Deborah (Washburn) Bolton of Bridge- 
water, who were married March 24, 1740. 

He marched with Capt. Crawford July 23, 1777, on the Rhode 
Island alarm. 

Nathaniel Bolton was a school-teacher and a local poet. At 
least three of his poems were printed. In the Massachusetts Spy 
of April 8, 1779, was the announcement: 

"On Saturday next will be published, and to be sold at the 
Printing-Office, A Poem on the Surrender of Gen. Burgoyne &c, 
composed by Nathaniel Bolton of Oakham, the week after that 
glorious conquest obtained by Gen. Gates." 

Some verses written by him on the "Death of Dr. Spencer 
Field" are preserved in the Fobes Memorial Library, and "A 
Poem on Infidelity," Greenwich, 1808, is in the Boston Public 
Library. An acrostic (MS.) on the Death of Mrs. Hannah 
Foster is in the possession of Miss Laura G. Burt. Mr. Bolton 
lived on the county road from Rutland to Brookfield, about a 
half mile south of Ware Corner. 

He married Jane, daughter of Thomas and Jane (Washburn) 
Thompson of Bridgewater, in 1777. She was bom in Bridge- 
water, in 1749, and died in Oakham, May 8, 1814. Only one son, 
Oliver, lived to grow up. 

M. S. R., ii, 251 (7). Oakham V. R., 112. Spy, Apr. 8, 1779. Note 
of Dea. Jesse Allen. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 118, 314. Plymouth 
Co. Marriages, 30. Bolton, Boltons of O. & N. England, xii. 

Alexander Bothwell, 2d. 

Son of Alexander Bothwell, who with his wife was among those 
who had been communicants in Ireland and who in 1729, "producing 
letters testimonial and consenting to church covenant, were admitted 
to full communion" with the church in Rutland. 

Alexander Bothwell, 2d, served in six campaigns: (i) on 
the alarm at Rhode Island, July 23, 1777; (2) in Capt. 
Crawford's Co., September 7 to November 29, 1777, at Still- 
4 



50 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

water, in the army that captured General Burgoyne; (3) in the 
company that guarded Burgoyne's troops at Rutland from March 
30 to July 2, 1778; (4) in Col. Whitney's Regt. from July 30 
to September 13, 1778; (5) as guard at Rutland in the summer 
of 1779; (6) again as guard at Rutland, April 20 to December 
20, 1780. He was Corporal in the Stillwater campaign. 

He was one of the first ten settlers of Oakham, and in 1748 
purchased from Jonas Clark of Boston, for "Five Pounds in 
Bills of Credit of ye Last Emission," seven hundred and four 
acres, as follows: the whole of Lot No. 20, seventy-nine acres 
in Lot X, and four triangular pieces of land called gores, 
lettered P, Q, R, S. He built a house at what is now Rice Corner, 
and kept an inn here from 1758, when his name first appears 
on the list of licensed innholders. 

Alexander Bothwell, 2d, was Precinct Moderator in 1760, and 
Selectman of the Precinct in 1759 and 1762I He was the father 
of eight children, the first four born in Rutland : Rachel, August 
8, 1742; Alexander, 3d, January 7, 1744; Mary, March 8, 1746, 
married in March, 1787, to Nehemiah Allen, Jr.; William, May 
19, 1748; Prudence, July 20, 1750, married July 8, 1790, to 
Valentine Bullard; John, May 14, 1752; Sarah, October 15, 
1755; James, September i, 1758. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 215. M. S. R, ii. 300 (2) [Bothel], (9). 
Oakham V. R., 13, 60. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Rutland Church 
Records, 1729. Records, Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, 1758. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, liv, 202. 

Alexander Bothwell, 3d. 

Born in Rutland, January 7, 1744, eldest son of Alexander Bothwell, 2d, 
who was one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. 

He marched as Second Lieutenant in Capt. John Crawford's 
company of minutemen on April 19, 1775, in response to the 
Lexington alarm. When the 4th Worcester County Regiment 
was organized in Brookfield, May 14, 1776, he was chosen First 
Lieutenant in the 8th Company, under the command of Capt. 
John Crawford, and received his commission May 31, 1776. He 
served as Lieutenant in Capt. Crawford's company on the 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 5 1 

alarm at Rhode Island, July 23, 1777; on the alarm at Ben- 
nington, August 20, 1777; also in Capt. Joseph Cutler's company 
of volunteers which marched to join General Gates at the North- 
ward, September 24, 1777, and in Capt. Daniel Gilbert's Co., 
Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., from July 30 to September 13, 1778, 
at Rhode Island. 

Little is known of his family. His wife's name was Mary. 
He lived in Oakham till his death, which occurred in 1813. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 189, 214, 22S, 229. M. S. R., ii, 300 (6) 
[Bothwel], (10). Oakham V. R., 13. Bothwell Family Records (MS.) 
in possession of Miss Florence Bothwell of Oakham. See John 
Crawford, p. 70. 

James Bothwell. 

Born in Oakham, September i, 1758, the fourth son of Alexander 
Bothwell, 2d. 

He enlisted September 7, 1777, in Capt. Crawford's company 
for a term of three months in the Stillwater campaign, and was 
made Corporal. He served also in Capt. Whipple's Co. on the 
Rhode Island alarm. 

James Bothwell was married (i) to Mary Wilson, May 31, 
1779; (2) to Sally Prouty, October 2, 1797. 

M. S. R., ii, 300 (3) [Botherill], (11). Oakham V. R, 13, 59, 60. 

John Bothv^rell. 

Born in Oakham, May 14, 1752, third son of Alexander Bothwell, 2d. 

He was one of the Oakham minutemen who marched with 
Capt. Crawford on the alarm of April 19, 1775. In the follow- 
ing year he served three months in New York. He was a 
member of Capt. Crawford's company which marched in 1777 on 
the Rhode Island and Bennington alarms, and of Capt. Cutler's 
company of volunteers sent September 24, 1777, to join General 
Gates at the Northward. 

John Bothwell lived on the present Bothwell farm. In 1778 
he purchased of Thomas Mann the grist mill on the Five Mile 



52 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

River, which has since remained in the possession of the Bothwell 
family. 

He married Rebecca McFarland, daughter of Alexander Mc- 
Farland, one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. Children, 
born in Oakham: Susannah, July 8, 1773; John, Jr., September 
25, 1775; Rebecka, May 23, 1780; Lucretia, October i, 1784; 
Reuben, April 9, 1788; Cheney, October 17, 1790. 

Cheney Bothwell married (i) Electa Rockwood of New 
Braintree in 1810. After her death, January 14, 1825, he mar- 
ried (2) Charlotte Rockwood. He was the father of Sylvander 
Bothwell, who served in the 42d Mass. Inf. in the Civil War. 

John Bothwell died in Oakham, January 12, 1814. His widow, 
Rebecca, died October 28, 1848, aged ninety-seven years. 

Oakham T. R., i. 168, 188, 189. M. S. R, ii, 300 (7) [Bothwell], 
(12). Oakham V. R., 13 [Lucretia = Christie], 59, 112 [Jan. 12, 1814 = 
Jan. II, 1812 (1822)]. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1776 [Alexander 
McFarland]. Bothwell Family Records (see above). John Robinson's 
Notes. 

William Bothwell. 

Born in Rutland, May 19, 1748, second son of Alexander Bothwell, 2d. 

He was Private in the company which marched under the 
command of Capt. Crawford on the alarm of April 19, 1775, 
and served as Corporal in 1776 for a term of two months with 
Lieut. Asa French at Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and North 
Castle. July 23, 1777, he went as Corporal in the Oakham 
company on an alarm at Rhode Island. He served six months 
in Rhode Island in 1777, and guaranteed one half of the expense 
of hiring Jacob Adams for a term of six months at Boston in 
1777. 

William Bothwell was Selectman of Oakham in 1784, 1785, 
and 1 79 1. He was married to Eunice, daughter of George 
Harper, April 27, 1769. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188, 214. M. S. R., ii, 300 (13). Oakham 
V. R., 13, 59 [Bothel]. Bothwell Family Records (see above). Pay Roll, 
Capt. How's Co., 1776. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 53 

The Boyd Family. 

The Boyd family came from the north of Ireland. Samuel 
Boyd removed from Rutland to Oakham in 1762 and bought 
of Nathaniel Hatch of Dorchester for £76 4s. 46.., Lot W, two 
hundred and fifty acres, and also nineteen acres in Lot BB. He 
was Warden in 1764, and Chairman of the Selectmen of Oak- 
ham in 1765. He was a strong Presbyterian and was one of the 
committee appointed by the town that was directed to "aplie to 
the Prisberty for a minister and Now whare Eals." His sons 
James and John served in the Revolution. 

Letter of Mrs. Alfred D. Parkman of North Brookfield. Oakham 
T. R., i, 31. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xlv, 376. 



James Boyd. 

Served in seven campaigns. He enlisted (i) May 2, 1775, for 
eight months' service at Roxbury under Capt. Hazeltine; (2) 
May 5, 1777, for two months at Rhode Island under Capt. 
Hodges; (3) August 27, 1777, for four months under Capt. 
Earll; (4) July 5, 1780, for three months under Capt. Paige at 
West Point; (5) August 27, 1781, for service of three months 
at West Point under Capt. Cutler. He was also detailed (6) to 
go with the company which guarded Burgoyne's troops on their 
march from Rutland to Enfield, Conn., November 3, 1778; and 
(7) marched with Capt. Crawford on the Rhode Island alarm. 
In the second, fourth and sixth campaigns he served as Corporal. 

He married Janet Bell in 1780, and had three sons, William, 
John, and Cheney, and four daughters, Mehetabel, Mary, 
Rebekah, and Lucretia, all born in Oakham. 

Cheney was born in 1797, and married Susan Flint of Oak- 
ham. His son, Isaac M., born in Oakham, July 7, 1821, was 
the father of John Flint Boyd, a soldier in the Civil War. 

Mrs. Janet Boyd was buried in the south part of the burying 
ground in the center of the town. The new meeting-house, 
which was erected in 18 14, covered her grave, and this led her 



54 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

husband to lay out the Boyd cemetery, in which he and seven 
of his family were buried. 

James Boyd died October 14, 1824, aged seventy-two years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 214 252, 280. M. S. R., ii, 358 (6), (7). 
368 (5) [Boyed]. Oakham V. R., 60, 112. Temple, Hist, of No. Brook- 
field, 534, 535. Letter of Mrs. Parkman (see above). 



John Boyd. 

Corporal in the company of Oakham minutemen who marched 
April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington alarm. He was also 
a private in Capt. Hamilton's company which served from 
August 3 to September 30, 1776, at Ticonderoga and Fort 
Edward. October 14, 1779, he enlisted for a term of three 
months at Claverack, and was placed in Col. Denny's regiment. 
He has credit on the town records for the Rhode Island alarm, 
and for a term of six months in Rhode Island in 1777. 

John Boyd became Captain of the Oakham company of Mas- 
sachusetts militia in 1794. He was a man of much ability and 
of good education, and was employed by the town for many 
years to make tax rates. He was often Assessor, was eight 
times Selectman of Oakham (in the years 1781, 1788, 1791, 
1794, 1797, 1799, 1801, and 1802), and in 1798 represented the 
town in the Massachusetts Legislature. In 1781 he was married 
to Judith Hall of Cornish. 

Capt. Boyd died in Oakham, August 12, 1833, at the age of 
eighty- two years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171, 188, 242, ii, 287. M. S. R., ii, 358 (8), (9). 
Oakham V. R., 60, 113. 

Asa Briggs. 

Marched in Capt. John Crawford's company on the alarm at 
Bennington, August 20, 1777. He enlisted September 7, 1777, 
for the Stillwater campaign, served with the army that captured 
Burgoyne, and was discharged November 29, 1777. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 55 

In 1783 he purchased land on East Hill, near Jacob Adams 
and Joseph Osborn. At a church meeting held June 17, 1779, 
he was chosen Chorister. He was one of the early signers of 
the church covenant, but probably was not in town in 1773, when 
the Congregational church was organized. 

Asa Briggs married Levina Chaddock, of Oakham, November 
12, 1778. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R, ii, 499 (2). Oakham V. R., 61. 
Oakham Church Records, i, i, 3, 6. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xcH, 407. 



James Brown. 

Marched with Capt. Crawford on the Bennington alarm, and 
has credit on the town records for six months at Brookfield. 
He also guaranteed one-half the expense of hiring a man for 
a campaign to New York for five months, and to Boston for two 
months. 

He came from Paxton to Oakham with his sister. Thankful 
Brown, Spinster, and purchased, March 26, 1765, from Setli 
Metcalf of Paxton, for £150, one hundred and fifteen acres in 
Lot No. 2, the farm on East Hill owned by the late William E. 
Keep. He was Selectman of Oakham four years, member of 
the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety seven 
years, and was one of the signers of the petition of June 23, 
1773, for the organization of a Congregational church in Oakham. 

His first Avife's name was Mary. She died September 28, 
1795, aged fifty-five years. He was again married, in 1796, to 
Widow Rhoda Clark of Rutland. Mr. Brown died June 12, 
1819, aged seventy-eight years. Four children are mentioned in 
his will, which was filed July 6, 1819: 

Moses, born April 10, 1773, Town Clerk of Oakham in 1812. 
His daughter, Esther Brown, was a well-known local revivalist. 

Thankful, married in 1810 to Jacob Evans of Rutland. Some 
of her writings on religious subjects, intended for publication 
but never printed, are still preserved. 



56 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Aaron, who married Azubah Green in 1786, and Elizabeth, 
who married a Mr. Pratt. The last two died before April 8, 
1818, when the will was written. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188, 189, 214. M. S. R., ii, 685 (12) [Samuel 
Brown]. Oakham V. R., 14. Oakham Church Records, i, i. Note of 
Dea. Jesse Allen. Recollections of Miss Amanda Crawford. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, July 6, 1819. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, liii, 171, xcviii, 
528. 

John Brown. 

Marched in Capt. Crawford's company on the Rhode Island 
and Bennington alarms, and paid one-half the expense of sending 
a man to New York for a term of five months. 

June 23, 1773, he signed the petition to the Council for the 
organization of the Oakham church in Congregational form. 

December 17, 1764, John Brown of Marlboro was married in 
Bolton to Phebe Fosket. Children: Phebe, born March 15, 1765, 
in Bolton; Elisabeth, born in Oakham August 30, 1770; Lucy, 
born in Oakham September 14, 1773. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188. M. S. R., ii, 646 (11). Oakham V. R., 
14. Bolton V. R., 114. Oakham Church Records, i, i. 



Isaac Billiard. 

Born in Weston, Mass., April 2, 1749, the second son of Jonathan 
and Anna (Harrington) Bullard. 

He marched in Capt. John Crawford's company on the alarm 
at Rhode Island, July 23, 1777, and served from July 26, 1777, to 
January 4, 1778, in Rhode Island, in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. 
Keyes's Regt. 

He removed to Maine, where he was married and had several 
children, but the records of his family are not preserved. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., ii, nZ (8) [Bulard], 782 (10). 
Bond, Geneal. and Hist, of Watertown, 148. Letter of J. H. Bullard of 
Springfield, Mass. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 57 

Jonathan Bullard. 

Born in Watertown, March 29, 1727, son of Jonathan and Ruth 
(Harrington) Bullard and descendant in the fifth generation of George 
Bullard, who died in Watertown, January 14, 1688. 

He was commissioned in 1771 First Lieutenant in the militia 
company of Oakham, of which James Craige, Jr., was Captain, 
In 1775 he had the title of Captain on the town records, and had 
no doubt by that time received his commission as Captain. He 
has credit on the town records for five months' service in the 
Revolutionary War, in New York in 1776. 

About 1750 he removed from Weston to Rutland, where he 
was innholder. His house was near White Hall, and on the county 
road from Rutland to Brookfield. In 1757 he removed to Oakham 
and purchased from Thomas Allen of Dorchester, for £54, the 
northerly half of Lot No. 13, containing one hundred and forty- 
five acres, the farm which is still occupied by Henry Bullard 
and on which seven generations of Bullards have lived. He 
increased his landed estates till he became the largest landholder 
in Oakham, owning a tract extending from near the northern 
boundary of the town to the road which runs from the present 
village of Oakham to New Braintree. He built a house on his 
original purchase, set on high land and commanding a fine view 
toward the north and northwest. This house stood practically 
unchanged till 1865, when it was remodeled by his great-grand- 
son, Avery Bullard. 

Jonathan Bullard held all the important offices in the gift of 
his fellow-citizens. He was often Assessor, Collector, and 
Treasurer; served twenty-three times as Moderator and four- 
teen times as Selectman, having been chosen on the first Board 
elected after the incorporation of Oakham; was a member of 
the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 
1775 and 1776; represented the town in the Great and General 
Court in 1787, 1788 and 1789; and was Delegate to the Pro- 
vincial Congress which convened at Salem, October 7, I774- 

He was married to Anna Harrington in 1745. After her 
death in 1753, he was again married. May 22, I755' to Lydia, 



58 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

daughter of Ebenezer Foster of Rutland, and sister of Lieut, 
Ebenezer Foster, the well-known innholder of Oakham. 

Children of Jonathan and Anna (Harrington) Bullard: Silas, 
born in Weston, May 24, 1746; Isaac, born in Weston, April 2, 
1749; Sybilla, born in Rutland, November 3, 1750; Hannah, 
born in Rutland, February 3, 1752; Samuel, born in Rutland, 
November 20, 1753. 

Children of Jonathan and Lydia (Foster) Bullard: Dorothy, 
born in Rutland, October 26, 1755; Ruth, born in Rutland, 
February 21, 1757; Jonathan, Jr., born in Oakham, December 24, 
1758; Abigail, born in Oakham, March, 1761 ; Patty, born in 
Oakham in 1763 ; Phineas, born in Oakham in July, 1764, 
baptized August 14, 1764; Moses, baptized April 4, 1767; 
Valentine, born in Oakham in 1769; Ebenezer, baptized August 
8, 1773; Hepsebath, born in Oakham in 1776; Lydia, born in 
Oakham in 1778. There were two daughters, Anna and Sarah, 
the dates of whose birth are not now known. Anna married Col. 
Isaac Hagar in Waltham, April 26, 1770; her son, David Hagar, 
born October 14, 1781, was father of Mrs. Horace Wilbur. 

Capt. Jonathan Bullard died in Oakham, November 26, 1796, 
aged seventy years. He was buried either on his own land or 
in the churchyard in the center of the town. His monument 
stands in Pine Grove Cemetery, but this was not laid out till 1812. 
On his monument are the following inscriptions. That of his 
widow was added several years after the stone dedicated to his 
memory was erected, and is cut mostly between the lines of the 
original inscription : 

IN MEMORY OF 
CAPT. JON BULLARD & Mrs. 

Lydia Bullard, his wife. She died 

WHO DIED 

May nth, 1819 

NOV. 26th, a. d. 1796 

Aged 84 

IN YE 70 YR 
OF HIS AGE 

" 'Tis but a few whose days amount 

To three score years and ten 
And all beyond that short account 
Is sorrow, toil and pain." 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 59 

Oakham T. R., i, 138, 168. Lieutenancy and Congressional Certificates 
in possession of J. H. Bullard (see above). Oakham V. R., 113. Rev. 
J. Dana's Notes. Rutland V. R., 23, 121. Waltham V. R., 44, 162. 
Bond, Geneal. and Hist, of Watertown, 148. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
xxiv, 502, xl, 167. 

Jonathan Bullard, Jr. 

Born in Oakham, December 24, 1758, the fourth son of Jonathan 
Bullard, and the eldest son of his second wife, Lydia Foster. 

He marched with Capt. Crawford on the Bennington alarm, 
August 20, 1777, and has credit on the town records for six weeks 
in Rhode Island in response "to the call of June i6, 1778. 

Jonathan Bullard, Jr., was a farmer and lived in a house at 
the Fairbank place from 1791 till 1800. This farm belonged 
to his father till November, 1796, when the son purchased from 
his father seventy acres of the farm, with the buildings thereon. 
February 4, 1800, he sold this property to Artemas Howe. Some- 
time after 1800, he removed to Maine and lived for many years 
in the town of Turner, and later in Foxcroft. 

He was married June 13, 1781, to Ruth Whittemore of 
Spencer, Mass., and had twelve children. The eldest was 
Jonathan, born in Oakham September 18, 1800, married October 
3, 1824, to Nancy Bradford. He died June 4, 1879, i" Foxcroft, 
Maine. 

The other children were : Isaac, Hepsebeth, Ruth (died young), 
Asa, Ebenezer, Ruth, Nathan, Joseph, Marshall, Lucy, Sally. 

Jonathan Bullard, father of the above children, died in Fox- 
croft, Maine, December 28, 1854, aged ninety-six years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188, 214. M. S. R., ii, 77Z (12) [Bulard]. Rutland 
V. R., 23. Letter of J. H. Bullard (see above). Wore. Co. Reg. of 
Deeds, cxxx, 138, cxxxi, 237, cxxxviii, 596. 

Samuel Bullard. 

Born in Rutland, November 20, 1753, third son and fifth child of 
Jonathan and Anna (Harrington) Bullard. 

He enlisted June 5, 1775, and served eight months at Roxbury, 
in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt. He also marched 



6o SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

with the Oakham company on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 
1777, and enlisted x\ugust 28, 1777, in Capt. Hodges's Co., Col. 
Cushing's Regt., for service at the Northward. 

He was married to Abigail Furness, sister of Mary Furness, 
the wife of his brother Silas. They had seven children. Samuel 
Bullard removed to Onondaga, N. Y., where he was killed in 
1802, at the raising of a building at a place called "The Lord's 
Corners." Mrs. Bullard died in 1840, aged ninety-six years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187. M. S. R., ii, 788 (2), (5). Rutland V. R., 
23. Letter of J. H. Bullard (see above). 



Silas Bullard. 

Born in Weston, May 24, 1746, eldest child of Jonathan and Anna 
(Harrington) Bullard. 

He was Corporal of the Oakham company of minutemen 
which marched April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington 
alarm; served two months in 1776 with Lieut. Asa French at 
Tarrytown, N. Y., in Col. James Converse's Regt. ; marched with 
Capt. Crawford on the Bennington alarm, August 20, 1777 ; and 
with Lieut. Alexander Bothwell, 3d, September 25, 1777, to join 
General Gates at the Northward. 

He was a farmer and large landholder. He built the original 
house, and owned the farm where the late Sanford H. Bullard 
lived and which is still in possession of his descendants. He 
subscribed £1 los. toward building the house of Mr. Tomlinson 
in 1786, to be paid in brick, probably of his own manufacture. He 
was Selectman of Oakham for twelve years, and Treasurer of 
the town eight years. 

Silas Bullard was married, April 4, 1770, to Mary Furness, 
daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Furness, who came to Oakham 
from Lynn in 1765. Children, all born in Oakham: Bettey, June 
7, 1771 ; Benjamin, March 16, 1773 ; Alpha, March 22, 1775, 
Ruth, December 5, 1777; Adin, October 11, 1779; William, Jan- 
uary 3, 1782; Moley, May 9, 1784; Silas, Jr., April 15, 1787; 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR gl 

Editha, June ii, 1789; Melissa, June 11, 1792; Calvin, Septem- 
ber 26, 1794; Joel, October 7, 1796. 

Two great-grandsons of Silas Bullard, Sergeant George A 
Bullard and his brother Silas, were soldiers in Co E 4th 
Michigan Cavalry, and shared in the capture of Jefferson Davis 
and his party on May 10, 1865, near Irwinsville, Ga., Sero-eant 
Bullard being the second, and Silas being among the firs^t six 
that entered his camp. 

Silas Bullard died February 9, 1826, aged seventy-nine. His 
wife, born in 1751, died February i, 1821. 

Oakham T. R., i, ^7 [Furnish], 168, 188, 189. M. S R i q,2 Ti^ 
[Ballard], ii, 774 (2) [Bulard], 789 (2). Oakham V. R.' 14' I'c 62 iii 
Letter of J H. Bullard (see above). Subscription Paper 'for' Mr 
Tomhnson May 3, 1786 (MS.). Bond, Geneal. and Hist, of Watertown; 
148. Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

Isaiah Butler. 

Has credit on the town records for three months' service in 
New York in the latter half of 1776. 

_ He came from Hardwick. Februarj^ 7, 1771, he was married, 
m New Bramtree, to Abigail Thresher. Children, born in Oak- 
ham: Prudence, April 5, 1772; Daniel, May 3, 1775. 
Oakham T. R., i, 168. Oakham V. R., 16. New Braintree V. R., y^. 

John Butler. 

Was one of the Oakham minutemen that marched with Capt. 
Crawford on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He was 
sent as guard to Boston April i, 1778, and was detailed by Capt. 
Crawford to serve, in November of that year, with the company 
that guarded Burgoyne's troops on their march from Rutland 
to Enfield, Conn. From October 14 to November 22, 1779, he 
was in Col. Gerrish's Regt., which was sent to reinforce the 
army under General Washington. 

He was married to Grace Black in 1775. Children, all born 
in Oakham: Alice, June 9, 1775; John, Jr., June 23, 1777; 
Lucretia, March 27, 1779; Molly, October 27, 1780; Sarah, 



62 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

October 24, 1782; James, January 22, 1785; Walter, December 
20, 1786; Elias, November 19, 1788; Melina, April 23, 1793; 
Melissa, May i, 1795; Walter, April 27, 1798. 

John Butler hired a private tutor to teach his children in his 
own house. His daughter Alice became a woman of much 
intelligence and culture. She was married to Jonas Munroe, 
in August, 1 80 1. Their son James, born in Oakham, January 
25, 1818, was graduated from Yale College in 1845. He taught 
as Principal of schools in Georgia, in eastern Massachusetts, and 
in Rockville, Cal., where he died March 19, 1861. 

John Butler died October 9, 1813. His widow, Grace, died 
January 12, 1818. The old Butler house was on the east side 
of the East Hill road, near where Edmund Dean afterward lived. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189, 214. M. S. R., ii, 949 (7), 950 (7). Oakham 
V. R., 16, 63 [Butlar], 114. Record of the Class of 1845, Yale College 
(1881), 142-146. Recollections of Miss Amanda Crawford. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, Nov. 20, 1813. John Robinson's Notes. 

George Caswell. 

Was one of the minutemen in the Oakham company that 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775. He has also credit on 
the town records for five months' service in New York in 1776. 
In October, 1775, he enlisted as a substitute for John Fisher, of 
New Braintree, in Capt. John Grainger's Co., Col. Learned's 
Regt., and was made Corporal. In March, 1780, he was detailed 
by Capt. Crawford to serve four months as guard at Rutland. 

He came from New Braintree in October, 1770, and purchased 
in 1771, for £81, eighty-nine acres in Lot No. 31, near the 
middle of said Lot, south of Isaiah Butler and west of the Widow 
Furbush. In 1773 he sold thirty-two acres, the northerly part 
of this lot, to Nathaniel Weeks for £44, retaining what became 
a part of the Percival Hall farm. 

March 28, 1771, he was married in New Braintree to Weltha 
Richmond. Children, born in Oakham: George, February 10, 
1772; Hannah, March 25, 1775; Luceba, March 16, 1777; 
Weltha, February 28, 1779; Lucena, March 22, 1781. 

George Caswell was living in Oakham in 1790. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 63 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 255. M. S. R., iii, 195 (6) [Castle], 196 (14) 
[Caswel]. Oakham V. R., 16 [Castle, Castwell], 17. New Braintree 
V. R., -jz. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
Ixxxi, 25, xcv, 448. 

Bowman Chaddock. 

Born March 12, 1762, in Brookfield, son of Joseph and Sarah Chaddock. 

He was mustered in, July 17, 1779, for a term of nine months 
in the Continental Army, in Capt. Wadsworth's Co., Col. Brad- 
ford's Regt., which served under General Benedict Arnold; age 
17, stature 5 feet 6, complexion light, residence Oakham. In 
his application for a pension, dated August, 1832, he wrote: "In 
summer of 1780 sent to White Plains with detachment of 300. 
We were attacked by 800 infantry and 200 light horse, and two- 
fifths of the command were killed or taken prisoners." 

September 5, 1782, he was married in New Braintree to Marcy, 
daughter of Ebenezer Nye, of Oakham. He was chosen Chorister 
at a church meeting in Oakham held December 18, 1782. 

He removed to Eaton, Sherbroke Co., Province of Lower 
Canada, where he died August 10, 1832, a few days after the 
date of his application for pension. 

Oakham T. R., i, 242. M. S. R., iii, 232 (6), yjz (9) [Chddock]. Oak- 
ham V. R., 63. Brookfield V. R., 58. Oakham Church Records, i, 6. 
Pension Application, Aug., 1832. 

Joseph Chaddock. 

Marched with a detachment from the Oakham company on 
the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 

He came to Oakham from Brookfield in 1777, and purchased 
on May 8 of that year the whole of Lot T, with the buildings, 
at the Reed Corner, on the spot where the Mullett house now 
stands. Here he kept an inn from 1777 to 1796. This house 
was destroyed by fire on the evening of December 11, 1798, and 
the one erected by Mr. Chaddock in its place was also burned, 
April II, 1874. 

Joseph Chaddock was a prominent citizen. He served the 
town nine times as Moderator, eleven times as Assessor, was 



64 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

for six years member of the Committee of Correspondence, 
Inspection and Safety, was seven times Selectman, and repre- 
sented the town in the General Court in 1790. His son, Calvin, 
born in Brookfield, September 4, 1765, was graduated at Dart- 
mouth College in 1791, and became a well-known minister in the 
Congregational Church. 

M. S. R., iii, 232 (10). Brookfield V. R., 58. Records, Wore. Co. Court 
of Sessions, 1777-1796. Spy, Dec. 26, 1798, June 20, 1790. Barre Gazette, 
Apr. 17, 1874. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxvi, 312, 313. General Cata- 
logue of Dartmouth College (1910-11), 198. 



Thomas Chaddock. 

Born November 12, 1760, in Brookfield, son of Joseph and Sarah 
Chaddock. 

He went with the Oakham company when it responded ( i ) to 
the alarm from Rhode Island, July 23, 1777, and (2) to the 
alarm from Bennington, August 20, 1777. 

He served as Chorister in the Sunday services of the Con- 
gregational Church in Oakham, beginning in 1782. 

In 1779 he married Parcis Smith of Paxton. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188. M. S. R., iii, 232 (12). Oakham V. R., 63. 
Brookfield V. R., 58. Oakham Church Records, i, 6. 



Caleb Church. 

In his application for a pension, dated April 8, 18 18, Caleb 
Church stated that he enlisted as a "Militia Man" in April, 
1775 (probably in one of the eight months' regiments that 
served in the siege of Boston), and again in the spring of 1776 
for a term of five months in Capt. John Wilcot's Co., Col. Hol- 
man's Regt. On May 19, 1778, he enlisted for the town of 
Oakham for a term of nine months in the Continental Army; 
age 32, stature 5 feet 10, complexion light. He arrived at 
Fishkill June 7, 1778, and was assigned to Capt. Blake's Co., 
Col. R. Putnam's Regt. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 65 

In 1777 he bought thirty acres of Alexander Bothwell, near 
Thomas Darling's land. 

Mr. Church died at Ashfield, Mass., in 1827, at the age of 
eighty-two years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 180. M. S. R., iii, 439 (6). Pension Application, 
Apr. 8, 1818. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxix, 155. 



James Conant. 

Born in Bridgewater, September 3, 1755, eldest son of Timothy and 
Hannah (Blackman) Conant. He came with his parents to Oakham in 
May, 1 77 1. 

James Conant enlisted May 2, 1775, and served eight months 
in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., at Roxbury. In 
January, 1776, he reenlisted for one year, in Capt. Moses Soul's 
Co., Col. Whitcomb's Regt. He marched in Capt. John Craw- 
ford's company in the campaign of August 20, 1777, to reinforce 
General Stark at Bennington. September i, 1777, he enlisted 
in the Continental Army for three years, and was discharged Sep- 
tember I, 1780. He served for the first two years mostly in Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey, in Capt. Lyman's Co., Col. Lee's Regt., 
and was in the battles of Springfield and Monmouth. In 1779 
he was transferred to Col. Henry Jackson's i6th Mass. Regt., 
and was promoted to First Sergeant in Capt. Scott's light infantry 
company of this regiment, which was stationed in Rhode Island, 
and was engaged in the battle of Rhode Island, on August 29. 

After his return from the army, he built the large two-story 
house on the county road from Rutland to Hardwick, which he 
occupied as merchant and innkeeper for many years. He was 
licensed innholder from 1796 to 1810. He was Captain of the 
Oakham company in the Massachusetts militia, Constable in 1794, 
Assessor in 1796, and Selectman of Oakham in 1788, 1796 and 
1799. 

January 7, 1779, he was married to Dorothy, daughter of 

Jonathan and Lydia (Foster) Bullard. Children, all bom in 

Oakham: Luther, July 20, 1779; Deborah, June 23, 1781 ; 

Elijah, March 12, 1783; Lot, May 8, 1785; Lucy, May 7, 1786; 

5 



66 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Betsy, March 6, 1789; Abigail, November 16, 1791 ; James, Jr., 
December 5, 1793; Lydia, August i, 1796; Charles, December 
4, 1798; John, May 8, 1801. 

Capt. James Conant died September 12, 1842, aged eighty- 
seven. His wife, Dorothy Bullard Conant, died November 25, 
1839, aged eighty-four years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 99, 165, 168. M. S. R., iii, 875 (9), 889 (i) [Conent]. 
Oakham V. R., 17, 18 [July 20, 1778, should be 1779], 65, 115. Family 
Bible of James Conant in possession of Mr. Frank S. Conant of Oakham. 
Conant Family, 206, 259. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 140. Pension 
Application, Apr. 15, 1818. Records, Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, 1796- 
1810. 

Luther Conant. 

Born in Bridgewater, January 7, 1758, second son of Timothy and 
Hannah (Blackman) Conant. He came with his parents to Oakham in 
May, 1 77 1. 

Luther Conant enlisted May 2, 1775, in Capt. Hazeltine's com- 
pany for eight months' service at Roxbury; also, March 5, 1776, 
for a term of one year in Capt. Soul's Co., Col. Whitcomb's 
Regt. March 11, 1777, he joined the Continental Army for a 
term of three years. He was Sergeant in Capt, Reed's Co., Col. 
Alden's (later Col. John Brooks's) Regt. He was discharged 
March 11, 1780. In July, 1780, he was engaged by the town 
of Hardwick for six months' service in the Continental Army; 
age 22, stature 5 feet 7, complexion light. His discharge was 
dated December 5, 1780. 

He lived in the West School Plot, and was Selectman of 
Oakham in 1797 and 1800. In 1818 he was living in Shutes- 
bury, Franklin Co., Mass. He was married to Mary White, 
daughter of Thomas White, December 4, 1783, and had one 
child, Justus. After his wife's death, he married, May 4, 1787, 
Susanna, daughter of Capt. Nehemiah Allen. Children: Sullivan, 
born February 26, 1801 ; Nathan; Abiah; Louisa; Susan; 
Hannah, married Luther Spear ; Lois, married John Conant. 

His widow, Susanna Conant, died August 15, 1840, aged 
seventy-three years. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 67 

Oakham T. R., i, 99, 165, 171. M. S. R., iii, 878 (7), (8), (9), 889 (2) 
[Conent], 897 (7) [Connant]. Oakham V. R., 51, 65, 115, 116. Family 
Bible (see above). Conant Family, 206, 259, 260. Mitchell, Hist, of 
Bridgevvater, 140. Pension Application, Apr. 21, 1818. Note of Mrs. 
William Spear. 



Timothy Conant. 

Born November 21, 1732, in Bridgevvater, son of Lot and Deborah 
(Lovell) Conant, and a descendant in the fifth generation of Roger 
Conant, vi^ho came to New England in 1623 and was living in Salem in 
1626. He removed from Bridgewater to Oakham in May, 1771. 

Timothy Conant served at Roxbury as Corporal in Capt. Bax- 
ter's Co., Col. Learned's Regt., in 1775, and receipted for ammu- 
nition to Capt. Barnabas Sears, February 15, 1776. March 11, 
1777, he enlisted in Capt. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt., for 
a term of three years in the Continental Army, but died in the 
service April 15, 1777. 

In 1754 he married Hannah Blackman. Children: James, born 
September 3, 1755; Susanna, bom August 5, 1756, died April 
16, 1758; Luther, born January 7, 1758; Susanna, born August 
5, 1760; Lucy, born 1762; Deborah, born August 6, 1764; Tim- 
othy, born February 20, 1770; Sylvanus, born April 23, 1773; 
Abigail and Sarah, born October 26, 1774; Hannah, born ?vlarch 
4, 1777- 

Oakham T. R., i, 99, 168. M. S. R., iii, 882 (12), 907 (7) [Conot]. 
Conant Family, 100, 104, 173, 205, 206. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 
138 [Lovell = Goodspeed], 140. 



Aaron Crawford. 

Born in Rutland, probably in 1743, fourth son of Alexander and 
Elizabeth Crawford. 

Aaron Crawford was Drummer in the company of minutemen 
that marched on April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington 
alarm. He also served as Sergeant in the Oakham company 
when it responded to the alarm from Rhode Island, July 23, 1777, 



68 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

and was a member of Capt. Cutler's company from Western 
(now Warren) and Oakham which marched September 24, 1777, 
to join the army under General Gates. 

In 1765 he bought, for £150, one hundred and fifteen acres in 
the northerly part of Lot No. 21 (the William Preshoe place), and 
also forty-six acres in Lot BB. The Preshoe farm he sold in 
1778 to James Dunbar. He lived in Oakham till about 1790, 
when he removed to St. Albans, Canada. 

He was married in 1768 to Jeales Gill, and had ten children, 
all born in Oakham: William, October 22, 1769; Elisabeth, 
January 18, 1771 ; Luther, April 27, 1773; Chloe, April 2, 1775; 
Alexander, February 28, 1777; Aaron, Jr., March 3, 1779; 
Jeales, December 15, 1780, died August 3, 1785 ; Robert, March 
26, 1783 ; Rachel, August 6, 1785 ; Spencer, November 14, 
1788. 

Spencer Crawford was in the service of Great Britain in the 
War of 181 2, and received wounds that made him a cripple 
for life. He died in Canada in 1857. 

M. S. R., iv, 94 (6), (7), (8). Oakham V. R., 18, 19, 20, 65, 116. 
Crawford Family of Oakham, 14 [Nov. 14, 1778, should be 1788]. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, liv, 299, Ixxxi, 476. 



Alexander Crawford. 

Born in Ireland in 1710, son of Aaron and Agnes (Wilson) Crawford. 
His father, Aaron Crawford, was born in 1677 in the Parish of Cappy, 
County of Tyrone, Ireland. He came to America with his wife and 
four children, Samuel, John, Alexander, and Martha, in 1713, and settled 
in Rutland in 1719, where he died August 6, 1754. Agnes Wilson was 
born in Ireland in 1677, and died in Rutland, December 10, 1760. Both 
are buried in the old cemetery in Rutland. 

Alexander Crawford, at the age of seventy, enlisted as a 
guard at Rutland, and served from February 27, 1780, to 
April 23, 1780. 

He removed to Rutland West Wing (now Oakham) in 1750. 
He was the leading man in the new settlement; was Moderator 
of the precinct and town meetings seven years. Town Clerk two 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 69 

years, Selectman eight years, Assessor five years, Collector in 
1759, when the precinct was formed, and Treasurer in 1766. He 
was also an elder in the Presbyterian Church in Oakham. 

February 5, 1736, he married Elizabeth Crawford, a distant 
relative, and had five sons, born in Rutland: John, January 7, 
1739; Aaron, probably in 1743; William, October 23, 1745, and 
two who died young. 

He died October 11, 1793, aged eighty-five years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 95, 255. M. S. R., iv, 94 (12). Crawford Family of 
Oakham, 5, 6, 7, 11, 15. 



Alexander Crawford, 2d. 

Born February 12, 1765, second son of Capt. John and Rachel 
(Henderson) Crawford. 

He enlisted October 3, 1779, and served till November 10, 
1779, in Capt. William Henry's company of guards at Castle 
and Governor's Island. When he enlisted, he gave his age 
as eighteen years, but he was less than fifteen. He was the 
youngest of the three generations of Crawfords that served in 
the war for independence. 

Alexander Crawford lived at the Thresher place, and was a 
gunsmith by trade. When David Ames, of the firm of Ames 
and Fobes, merchants in Oakham, was appointed by President 
Washington the first superintendent of the Springfield armory, 
he took with him Alexander Crawford, who made the first gun- 
lock and shared with Richard Beebe the honor of stocking the 
first gun made by the United States. 

He married, (i) June 26, 1788, Bethiah Willis, daughter of 
Jonathan Willis and granddaughter of Dr. Stoughton Willis; 
(2) September 6, 1813, his cousin, Mary Henderson of Oakham, 
granddaughter of Lieut. James Henderson of Rutland. Children, 
all born in Oakham: Salmon, July 23, 1789; Lucinda, March 
12, 1791 ; Susan, March 2, 1793, grandmother of the five 
Macombers (John, George, Henry, William, and James) who 
served in the Civil War; Ruth, March 31, 1796; Vashti, August 



70 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

8, 1798; Benjamin Franklin, August 10, 1800; Hosea Willis, 
August 25, 1802, father of the three Crawfords (Henry, John G., 
and Charles S.) who served in the Civil War; Galen Allen, 
November 17, 1804, father of Alfred Galen, who served in the 
Civil War; Mary Packard, November 5, 1807; Emeline Maria, 
September 30, 1814, mother of Gardner M. Dean, who served 
in the Civil War; Anson Alexander, January 17, 1817; William 
Amory, October 7, 1820. 

Oakham T. R., i, 255. M. S. R., iv, 94 (10). Oakham V. R., 18, 19, 
20, 21, 65. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes [June 26 or 20]. Crawford 
Family (MS.) by Hon. John G. Crawford of Manchester, N. H. Crawford 
Family of Oakham, 11, 12. Wright, The Fobes Memorial Library, 30 n.21. 



John Crawford. 

Bom January 7, 1739, in Rutland, second son of Alexander and 
Elizabeth Crawford. He came to Oakham with his father in 1750. 

John Crawford was Captain of the Oakham company of 
minutemen which marched from Oakham April 19, 1775, in 
response to the Lexington alarm. At the organization of the 
4th Worcester County Regiment at Brookfield, May 14, 1776, 
he was chosen Captain of the 8th (Oakham) Company, and 
received his commission May 31, 1776. As Captain of the 
Oakham company, he had general charge of the military affairs 
of the town, and enlisted or selected by lot the men to go on 
the several campaigns. He marched at the head of detachments 
of his company on July 23, 1777, when he was ordered to 
Providence on an alarm; and on August 20, 1777, when ordered 
to reinforce General Stark at Bennington. From September 7, 
1777, till the end of November, he was in command of a com- 
pany of forty men raised in Hardwick, Oakham and New 
Braintree to reinforce the army of General Gates, and had an 
active part in the engagements that resulted in the capture of 
General Burgoyne. October 15, 1779, Capt. Crawford and Lieuts. 
Bothwell and French, who had been in office more than three 
years and had each been engaged in several campaigns, asked 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 7 1 

the town to be relieved from further service. This request the 
town at first granted, but at a meeting held October 25, they 
were persuaded to continue in office, and they all served till the 
close of the war. 

Capt. Crawford was a farmer, and spent all his active life on 
the farm owned by the late Deacon Horace W. Lincoln. He 
purchased this farm from his father, Alexander Crawford, in 
1759, for iioo. It was the southerly part of Lot No. 21 and 
contained two hundred and four acres. Capt. Crawford was 
Warden of the district of Oakham in 1767, Selectman of the town 
in 1775 and 1781, and a member of the Committee of Correspond- 
ence, Inspection and Safety in 1777. 

He was three times married : 

(i) February 9, 1759, to Rachel Henderson, daughter of 
Lieut. James Henderson, who held a commission in the colonial 
militia and had served in the French and Indian wars. Rachel 
Henderson was born July i, 1739; died April 24, 1773. 

(2) In 1773, to Phebe Green, born March 28, 1744, daughter 
of John and Dorothy Green of Brookfield. 

(3) To Mary (Ford) Perkins, widow of Zephaniah Perkins, 
who was killed in battle, September 15, 1777. She died April 2, 
1829, aged eighty-four years. 

Children, all born in Oakham: Elizabeth, March 14, 1760; 
John, Jr., May 2, 1762; Alexander, 2d, February 12, 1765; 
Sarah, July 14, 1767; Samuel, August 9, 1768; Calvin, October 
18, 1770; Rachel, April 2, 1773; Josiah, April 25, 1774; Polly 
and Patty, December 31, 1778; Luc)^, December 30, 1780; Han- 
nah, August 16, 1782, grandmother of Henry P. Wright who 
served in the Civil War; Eliakim, August 16, 1784; Nancy, 
March 10, 1786. 

Capt. John Crawford died October 16, 1824, in the eighty-sixth 
year of his age. 

Eleven of his descendants who were born or brought up in 
Oakham served in the Civil War : Henry W. Crawford, John G. 
Crawford, Charles S. Crawford, Alfred G. Crawford. John 
Macomber, George B. Macomber, Henry I. Macomber, William 
Macomber, James Macomber, Gardner M. Dean, Henry P. 
Wright. 



72 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 228, 229. M. S. R., iv, 95 (12). Oakham 
V. R., 18, 19, 20 [Samuel, July 16, 1767, should be Sarah], 116. Brookfield 
V. R., 108. Rutland V. R., 127. Crawford Family of Oakham, 7, 11, 12 
[Aug. 9, 1768, should be 1769], 13. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xl, 554. 
Crawford Family (MS.) (see above). See Daniel Henderson, p. 98; 
Zephaniah Perkins, p. 132. John Crawford, A Record of the Childrens 
Ages (MS.). 

John Crawford, Jr. 

Born May 2, 1762, eldest son of Capt. John and Rachel (Henderson) 

Crawford. 

He enlisted March 30, 1778, when under sixteen years of age, 
in Capt. Thomas Whipple's company for guarding General 
Burgoyne's troops at Rutland, and served till July 2. He was 
one of the men detached from General Warner's brigade, 
November 3, 1778, to guard troops of the Saratoga Convention 
from Rutland to Enfield, Conn. October 3, 1779, he enlisted in 
Capt. William Henry's company, raised in Worcester County, 
for service at Castle and Governor's Island, from which he was 
discharged November 10, 1779. From December 6, 1779, till 
April 22, 1780, he served in Capt. Ephraim Hartwell's company 
of guards at Rutland. July 7, 1780, he enlisted for a term of 
three months at West Point; age 18, stature 5 feet 10, complexion 
light. 

John Crawford, Jr., was a school-teacher. Before 1790 he 
went to New York State, where he continued in his profession 
till his death in 1797. 

Oakham T. R., i, 214, 252, 255. M. S. R., iv, 96 (2), (7), (9), 131 (10), 
(11) [Crofford]. Crawford Family of Oakham, 11. 

William Crawford. 

Born in Rutland, October 23, 1745, fifth son of Alexander and 
Elizabeth Crawford. 

William Crawford marched as Sergeant of the Oakham com- 
pany when it responded to the alarm of July 23, 1777, from 
Rhode Island, and also as Sergeant on the alarm of August 20, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 73 

1777, from Bennington. He has also credit on the town records 
for a campaign to Boston, beginning April i, 1778. 

He was a clockmaker by trade. A large number of clocks of 
his manufacture are still preserved in different parts of New 
England, and the most of these will be good time keepers a 
hundred years hence. He was Town Clerk of Oakham for 
twenty-one years, and Selectman fourteen years. He was the 
father of General William Crawford of the Massachusetts militia, 
who served as Captain in the War of 1812, and of Alexander 
Crawford, Chairman of the Selectmen of Oakham during the 
period of the Civil War. 

In 1773 he married Mary Henderson, second daughter of 
Lieut. James Henderson and sister of the first wife of Capt. 
John Crawford. Children, all born in Oakham: Elizabeth, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1774; James, August 11, 1775; Lucy, February 7, 
1778; William, February 25, 1780, died March 30, 1781 ; 
Sarah, January 30, 1782, died February i, 1798; William, Jr., 
October 5, 1783; Rufus, November 13, 1785; Molly, October 6, 
1787; Isabel, February 24, 1790; Alexander, April 16, 1792; 
Harriot, March 10, 1795, died March 19, 1795. 

William Crawford died June 30, 1833, aged eighty-seven years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 189. M. S. R., iv, 97 (12). Oakham V. R., 
19, 20, 21, 116, 117. Crawford Family of Oakham, 15. 



Jonathan Cunningham. 

Has credit on the town records for three months' service in 
New York in 1776. 

In 1773 he was living in Lot No. 24. In 1785 he purchased, 
for £335 14s. 5d., eighty-nine acres with the buildings thereon 
in the same lot, late the property of John Murray, conspirator. 
This he sold the following year to Jonathan Willis, of Bridge- 
water, who sold the same in 1795 to Nathaniel Willis, of Bridge- 
water. 

Mr. Cunningham was married September 3, 1771, to Bethiah 
Thresher, of New Braintree. 



74 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Oakham T. R., i, i68. Oakham V. R., 66. New Braintree V. R., 'jy 
[Sept. 3, i77i=:Sept. 13]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixx, 617, xcix, 580, 
c, Zl^, cxxiii, 560. 

Thomas Darling. 

Began his service of nine months in the Continental Army on 
his arrival at Fishkill, June 7, 1778; age 46, stature 5 feet 8, 
complexion light, residence Oakham. He may have come from 
Mendon, 

In 1777 he was living near Caleb Church. In 1778 he bought, 
for i6i 4s., fifty acres in Lot Y, west of the county road from 
Rutland to Brookfield, and south of Daniel Bolton's land. His 
estate was settled in 1788, and Zenas Darling was administrator. 
He had fifty-one acres of land with a small dwelling house, 
valued at £90. 

Oakham T. R., i, 180. M. S. R., iv, 442 (5), v, 83 (3) [Durbing]. 
Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Sept., 1788. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, exiv, 29. 

Samuel Davis. 

Born in Rutland, January 15, 1751, son of Simon and Hannah (Snow) 
Davis, and grandson of Lieut. Simon Davis, who with his wife, Dorothy 
(Heath), came from Concord to Rutland about 1720. Samuel Davis 
was uncle to John Davis, who was four times elected Governor of 
Massachusetts, and three times elected United States Senator. 

He has credit on the town records for three months' service 
in New York in 1776. 

Samuel Davis removed to Oakham from Paxton about 1773. 
He was one of the signers of the petition for a church in Con- 
gregational form, and was chosen Deacon in 1793 to succeed 
Deacon Fitts, who died December 9, 1792. He was chosen 
Selectman of Oakham in 1783, and was on the Committee of 
Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1778. 

His first wife's name was Katherine. Children: Ezra, born 
in Paxton, September 5, 1773; Lucretia, born April 2, 1778; 
Barak, born June 13, 1780; Nancy, born June 24, 1782; Adin, 
born March 25, 1784; Caty, born February 25, 1786; Polly, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 75 

bom August II, 1788. His wife Katherine died December i, 
1794, and he was again married in the early part of 1796 to 
Mary, daughter of Joseph Osborn, who died May 19, 1834, aged 
eighty years. 

Deacon Davis died July 12, 1817, at the age of sixty-six. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. Oakham V. R., 21, 67, 117, 119 [Fitts]. Rutland 
V. R., 34. Oakham Church Records, i, 3. Reed, Hist, of Rutland, 132, 
133 [Jan. 15, 1751= June, 1751], 134- 

Daniel Deland. 

Born May 10, 1736, son of Paul Deland, who removed from Newbury 
to Brookfield between 1725 and 1740. 

Daniel Deland was one of the minutemen who marched with 
Capt. Crawford on the alarm of April 19, 1775. On May 22, 
1775, he reenlisted in Capt. Hazeltine's company for a term of 
eight months at Roxbury and was enrolled as Fifer. In 1776 
he served at Ticonderoga in Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regt. He 
enlisted in March, 1777, for a term of three years in the Con- 
tinental Army, and was in Capt. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's 
Regt. Reported invalided March 7, 1778, and transferred to 
Lieut. Osgood Carleton's company of invalids stationed at 
Boston. Beginning January 10, 1781, he served one year as 
guard at Rutland. 

He was twice married : ( i ) in 1757 to Elisabeth Hatfield ; (2) 
in 1780 to Elizabeth Anderson of Rutland. 

Oakham T, R., i, 165, 199, 243. M. S. R., iv, 594 (P) [Dealing], 640 
(7), (8), (9). Brookfield V. R., 74, 300, 301. Temple, Hist, of No. 
Brookfield, 567. 

Daniel Deland, Jr. 

Son of the above, was hired by Capt. John Crawford for the 
term of eight months at Roxbury, beginning May 22, 1775, in 
Capt. Hazeltine's company, and was enrolled as Fifer under the 
name of Daniel Crawford Deland. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., iv, 594 (10) [Dealing], 640 (10). 



76 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Moses Doty. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham at Brookfield, September 15, 
1777, for three years in the Continental Army; residence, Oak- 
ham. He was in Capt. Daniel Shay's Co., Col. Rufus Putnam's 
Regt., and was Fife Major. He was also claimed by the town 
of Hardwick, and it is uncertain to which town he was credited. 



M. S. R., iv, 894 (6). 



Benjamin Dunbar. 



Born in 1749 in Bridgewater, son of James and Hannah (Benson) 
Dunbar. 

He was engaged by Capt. Crawford for the town of Oakham, 
June 28, 1779, for a term of six months in Rhode Island, in Capt. 
Thomas Fisher's Co., Col. Nathan Tyler's Regt.; discharged 
December 17, 1779. 

Benjamin Dunbar purchased on May 8, 1778, from James 
Dunbar, fifty-seven acres in Lot No. 21. In 1773, he was mar- 
ried to Wealthy Washburn, of Middleboro. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215. M. S. R., v, 25 (4). Mitchell, Hist, of Bridge- 
water, 148. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxi, 474. 



Benson Dunbar. 

Born in Bridgewater in 1757. He was son of James Dunbar, who 
was born in 1721, and married, January 22, 1745, Hannah, daughter of 
John Benson. After her death he was again married in 1757 to Martha 
Packard. Mr. James Dunbar died in 1778. 

Benson Dunbar was Drummer in the New Braintree company 
which served for a term of eight months at Roxbury, with Capt. 
John Grainger, beginning May i, 1775. He failed to return a gun 
received by him at this time, which belonged to the town of New 
Braintree, and his wages were withheld till July i, when Capt. 
Grainger gave him a certificate that the gun had been returned. 
He was one of the eleven men in the Oakham company detailed by 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 77 

Capt. Crawford in 1778 for fifteen days' service in the regiment 
which guarded Burgoyne's captured troops on the march from 
Rutland to Enfield, Conn. 

Benson Dunbar purchased of James Dunbar, May 29, 1779, 
a house and sixty acres of land in Lot No. 21. He married 
Rebecka Darling in 1781. Children, born in Oakham: Ruth, 
July 27, 1782; Marcy, October 9, 1785; Benson, Jr., November 
26, 1787; Benjamin, March i, 1790; Orpah, October 26, 1793; 
Roxie, February 14, 1799. 

Oakham T. R., i, 214. M. S. R., iv, 864 (15) [Donbor], v, 25 (6), 33 
(11) [Dunber]. Oakham V. R., 23, 69. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 
147, 148 [1746 should be Jan. 22, 1745]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxi, 
475. Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, ii, 119. Plymouth Co. Marriages, 48. 

James Dunbar. 

Marched in Capt. Crawford's company on the Rhode Island 
alarm, July 23, 1777. He also enlisted June 28, 1779, for six 
months in Rhode Island, and joined Capt. Fisher's Co., Col. 
Tyler's Regt. ; discharged December 17, 1779. 

Though his name is not on that part of the family record which 
is preserved, James Dunbar was without doubt brother of Benson 
and Benjamin Dunbar. 

On April 21, 1778, he purchased of Aaron Crawford one 
hundred and fifteen acres in the northerly part of Lot No. 21, 
the William Preshoe farm. This farm he sold soon after to 
Benjamin and Benson Dunbar, and the three Dunbars lived 
together in the house on this farm. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 215. M. S. R., v, 29 (i). Wore. Co. Reg. of 
Deeds, Ixxxi, 474, 475, 476. 

George Dunn. 

Enlisted May 10, 1775, for the term of eight months in Capt. 
Seth Washburn's Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Regt. 

He was a cordwainer. In 1761 he bought, for £48 6s., of 
Alexander Bothwell, eighty acres, ninety rods, "the gore of land 



78 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

that joynes southerly on Spencer line, bounded by the County 
Road and Five Mile River," the farm now owned and occupied 
by Herbert Dwelly. 

January 31, 1754, he was married to Rachel Harper, daughter 
of William Harper. Children, born in Oakham : William Harper ; 
Alexander, September 19, 1761 ; Rachel, March 14, 1763. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., v, 23 (i) [Dun]. Oakham V. R., 23. 
Rutland V. R., 133 [Dun]. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Oct. 31, 1774 
[William Harper]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, liv, 203. 



William Harper Dunn. 

Son of George and Rachel (Harper) Dunn, and named for his 
grandfather, William Harper, one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. 

William Harper Dunn was a Private in the company of min- 
utemen who marched from Oakham, April 19, 1775, on the 
Lexington alarm. He reenlisted while still in service, on April 
27, 1 775 J ^or eight months at Roxbury in Capt. Hazeltine's 
company. In 1777 he enlisted for a term of three years in the 
Continental Army, and joined Capt. Goodale's Co., Col. Putnam's 
Regt. 

William Harper dictated in his will, dated September 7, 1774: 
"A three year old colt, and my saddle, I give and bequeath to 
my grandson William Dunn, also my gun." 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 171. M. S. R., v, 60 (7) [William Dunn], 61 (3). 
Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Oct. 31, 1774 [William Harper]. 



Joseph Dwelly. 

Engaged March 3, 1781, for a term of three years in the Con- 
tinental Army for the town of Worcester; occupation farmer, 
age 17, stature 5 feet 8, complexion light. He was in the 
company of Capt. Mason Wattles in the 6th Mass. Regt., then 
commanded by Col. Calvin Smith. 

In 1818 he was living in West Boylston, Mass., from which 
place he removed to Oakham and purchased. May 27, 1822, of 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 79 

John Glazier, the house in the southerly part of Oakham in which 
William Parmenter was then living, and with it fifty-eight acres 
of land. September 5, 183 1, he bought of David F. Tenney, 
for $200, a piece of land containing fifty rods, with the buildings 
thereon, where he lived for the remainder of his life. This was 
the first residence south of the East Hill schoolhouse. 

Joseph Dwelly was probably son of Joseph and Mary Dwelly. 
He was married in West Boylston May 25, 1815, to Triphosa 
Parmenter of Oakham. Children: Mary, born August 17, 1816; 
William, born December 8, 1818; Thomas Miles, born July 12, 
1822; Joseph Benjamin, born December 21, 1833. 

Mr. Dwelly was a Revolutionary pensioner. He died in Oak- 
ham, April 27, 1839, aged seventy-five years. 

M. S. R., V, los (9) [Dwelle]. Oakham V. R., 23, 69, 118. West 
Boylston V. R., 129, Pension Application, Apr. 11, 1818. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, ccxxxi, 230, cclxxxviii, 68. 



Joseph Eager. 

Marched with Capt. Crawford in response to the Lexington 
alarm on April 19, 1775. While still in service as a minuteman, 
he reenlisted April 27, 1775, in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. 
Fellows' Regt., and was made Corporal. On October 7, 1775, he 
was reported sick at Marlboro. He was entitled to a bounty 
coat or its equivalent in money, as by order dated Dorchester, 
November 27, 1775. 

In 1776 Joseph Eager sold forty acres, being the southeasterly 
part of Lot No. 16, to Robert Forbes. This land was west of 
land owned by James Bell, Jr., and south of Edward Partridge, 
2d's land. 

His wife's name was Hannah. They had a daughter named 
Sarah Wood, born in Oakham, February 3, 1772. A Joseph 
Eager was living in Boylston in 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R, v, 136 (7). Oakham V. R., 24 [Eger]. 
U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 214. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxi, 526. 



8o SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Nathan Edson. 

Came from Bridgewater. He was the eldest son of Ebenezer and Lucy 
(Packard) Edson, and was born in Bridgewater in 1753. 

He was one of Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen that 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775. In the summer of 1776 
he enlisted for two months' service with Lieut. Asa French, at 
Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and North Castle. He also served in the 
Oakham company on the Providence alarm of July 23, 1777, 
and in the company raised in Hardwick, Oakham and New 
Braintree for the Stillwater campaign of the same year. 

In 1778 he married Susanna, daughter of Ephraim Allen, and 
went to Rehoboth. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188. M. S. R., v, 230 (i). Mitchell, Hist, of 
Bridgewater, 155. Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

Spencer Field. 

Born in Northfield, Mass., September 26, 1754, son of Deacon Paul and 
Christian (Hubbard) Field, and descendant in the fifth generation of 
Zechariah Field who arrived in Boston in 1629, and settled in Dorchester. 

On January 2^, 1776, Spencer Field was chosen, by the House 
of Representatives with the concurrence of the Council, Sur- 
geon's Mate in Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt. This was one of 
the six Worcester County regiments raised to serve before 
Boston till April i, 1776. 

Spencer Field studied medicine and practiced in Rutland and 
Oakham. He came to Oakham not later than 1778, and lived in 
a house on a private road leading from the Old Turnpike, a 
few rods east of the North Four Corners. This house was 
standing and in good repair in 1900. He was a celebrated physi- 
cian, highly esteemed in this and neighboring towns. He was 
Town Clerk in 1778 and 1800, Moderator in 1786, served the 
town three times as Assessor and four times as Selectman, and 
was chosen Representative to the General Court in 1801. 

September 28, 1776, he was married to Betsey, daughter of 
Dr. John Frink of Rutland. Children: John, born November 3, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 8 1 

1777; Betsey, baptized February 6, 1780; Isabella, baptized 
December 9, 1781. 

John studied medicine with his father, married Rhoda Bowman 
of New Braintree, August 11, 1799, and removed to New 
Braintree some time after 1800, when he was Collector of Taxes 
in Oakham. He was drowned November 27, 1815, in Cedar 
Swamp [Demond's] Pond, Rutland. 

Betsey married Rev. Daniel Beard, October 5, 1798. Among 
her descendants may be mentioned Rev. Augustus Field Beard, 
Corresponding Secretary of the American Missionary Associa- 
tion, and Member of the Corporation of Yale University; Dr. 
George Miller Beard, specialist in nervous diseases in New York 
City; and Rev. William Spencer Beard of Bridgeport, Conn. 

Dr. Spencer Field died November 11, 1801, from injuries 
received in the early evening of October 5, on the road near 
where the house of the Misses Eunice and Louisa Ayres now 
stands. The road here ran then, for some distance, through a 
dense forest. While he was riding on horseback to visit a patient 
in the southwest part of the town, two men, returning from a 
muster in New Braintree and riding at great speed, ran against 
him and threw him from his horse upon a rock by the roadside. 
A monument was erected on the spot where the accident occurred, 
on which were these verses, written by Nathaniel Bolton : 

STOP PASSENGERS 

BEHOLD THIS FATAL ROCK. 

HERE FROM THE WOUND 

THE CRIMSON BLOOD DID FLOW 

HERE DR. FIELD REC'd HIS FATAL SHOCK 

THAT HASTENED DEATH 

AND PROVED HIS OVERTHROW. 

A poem on the Death of Dr. Field, written by Nathaniel Bolton, 
is preserved in the Fobes Memorial Library. 

M. S. R., V, 655 (s). Oakham V. R., 25, 71, 119. Rutland V. R., 225 
[Nov. 27, i8iS=Aug. 28]. New Braintree V. R., 81 [Aug. 11, 1799= 
(Aug.) 22]. Field Genealogy, i, 56, 97, 116, 141, 225-226, 313-318, 466- 
467. Note of Dea. Jesse Allen. Spy, Dec. 16, 1801. Nathaniel Bolton's 
Poem. 

6 



82 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

The Forbes Family. 

Arthur Forbes came from Rutland and purchased in 1757, for 
iiio 13s. 46.., two hundred and fifty acres, the whole of Lot 
No. 28. This was the lot in which the Perley Ayres farm was 
situated. The Forbes house was on the south side of the lot, 
at the corner where the Perley Ayres road joins the Bell road; 
the cellar hole is still to be seen. The name is spelled on the 
town records and on the muster rolls Forbes, Forbs, Forbus, 
Forbush, Furbush. 

He was Treasurer of Oakham in 1762 and 1764, Collector in 
1760, and Warden in 1765. 

June 30, 1749, he was married to Ruth Lamond of Leicester. 
The following are names of eight children of Arthur Forbes, with 
the probable years of birth : John, 1750; Robert, 1751; Charles, 
1753; Martha, 1754; Archibald, 1757; Margaret, 1758; Arthur, 
Jr., 1759; James, 1762. 

Arthur Forbes died before 1773, when his wife was Called the 
Widow Forbush. In 1773 guardians were appointed for his 
younger children. 

Leicester V. R., 152 [Forbus]. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, May 10, 1773. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xxxix, 483, xcv, 448. 

Archibald Forbes. 

Born in Oakham in 1757, fourth son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

He enlisted in Capt. Dexter's company, which was raised in 
Hardwick, New Braintree and Oakham and which went into 
camp at Roxbury May 19, 1775. He also served two months 
at Roxbury in the early part of 1776, and receipted February 16 
for ammunition to Capt. Barnabas Sears. September i, 1777, he 
enlisted in Capt. Earll's company for service at Providence, from 
which he was discharged January 4, 1778. Soon after his return 
from Rhode Island he was detailed, for a term of six months, 
as guard at Rutland. He enhsted also in the Continental Army 
in 1780 for a term of six months; age 24, stature 5 feet 10, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 83 

complexion dark. He marched from Oakham July 6, 1780, and 
was discharged November 16, 1780. 

In 1 78 1 he married Sarah Moore. Children, born in Oakham: 
Archibald, Jr., May 7, 1782; William, February 29, 1784. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 1S8, 214, 251. M. S. R., v, 845 (11), 849 (12) 
[Forbs], vi, 203 (12) [Furbush]. Oakham V. R., 26, ^2. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, May 10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.]. 

Arthur Forbes, Jr. 

Born in Oakham in 1759, fifth son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

He was enrolled in Capt. Crawford's Co., May 26, 1778; age 
19, complexion dark, residence Oakham. 

M. S. R., vi, 203 (13) [Arthur Furbush], = 205 (2) [James Furbush]. 
Wore. Co. Prob. Reeords, May 10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.]. 

Charles Forbes. 

Born in Rutland in 1753, third son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

He enlisted July 2, 1777, aged twenty-four years, for six 
months' service in Providence and joined Capt. Earll's Co., Col. 
Keyes's Regt., from which he was discharged, January 4, 1778. 
Charles, James, and John Forbes probably did not join Capt. 
Earll's Co. till late in July, as they marched on July 23, 1777, on 
the Rhode Island alarm. 

In 1773, when he was twenty years of age, Charles Forbes had 
James Bell for his guardian. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., v, 846 (2), (4). Wore. Co. Prob. 
Records, May 10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.]. 

James Forbes. 

Born in Oakham in 1762, sixth son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

In the summer of 1776, he enlisted for two months, at the age 
of fourteen, with Lieut. Asa French, at Dobbs Ferry, Tarry- 



84 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

town and North Castle, and again May 5, 1777, for two months 
in Rhode Island, in Capt. Hodges's Co., Col. Whitney's Regt. 
July 2, 1777, he reenlisted for six months in Capt. Earll's Co., 
Col. Keyes's Regt., and was discharged January 4, 1778. August 
2^, 1 781, he enlisted for three months in the Continental Army, 
in Capt. Cutler's Co., Col. Luke Drury's Regt., at West Point; 
descriptive list; age 19, stature 5 feet 6, complexion dark. He 
was discharged December 3, 1781. James Forbes also marched 
on the Rhode Island alarm in 1777. 

In 1773, after the death of his father, Ruth Forbes was ap- 
pointed guardian of her son James, then eleven years of age. 

James Forbes was married in New Braintree to Eleanor Brown 
of Oakham, September 12, 1782. Children, born in Oakham: 
Benjamin, February 15, 1783, married (i) Keziah Green of 
Barre in 1804, (2) Widow Huldah Prouty, January 31, 1821 ; 
Polly, February 11, 1785; Jonas, January 23, 1787; James, Jr., 
January 18, 1789, died October 16, 1846, aged fifty-eight; Lam- 
mond, September i, 1790; Hannah, October 6, 1792; Jacob, 
April 4, 1794; Susey, February 26, 1796. 

October 3, 1797, Eleanor Forbes was administratrix of the 
estate of James Forbes, late of Oakham, deceased. She had 
$12.09, so small a sum that the Judge of Probate said: "It 
would answer no valuable purpose if divided among the numerous 
creditors," and it was given to the widow to provide necessaries 
to support life. Mrs. Forbes died in Oakham in May, 1830. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 280. M. S. R., v, 847 (i), (2), 850 (8), (9), 
(10) [Forbs]. Oakham V. R., 26, ^2, 119. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 
May 10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.], Oct. 3, 1797 [James Forbes]. Pay 
Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

John Forbes. 

Born in Rutland in 1750, eldest son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

He marched with Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen, 
April 19, 1775, and with Lieut. Asa French in the summer of 
1776 for service of two months at Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and 
North Castle. July 9, 1777, he enlisted in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 85 

Keyes's Regt, for service in Rhode Island, from which he was 
discharged December 31, 1777. He was also detailed by Capt. 
Crawford to serve in Capt. Houghton's company from November 
3 to November 19, 1778, to reinforce guards at the barracks in 
Rutland, and to escort General Burgoyne's captured troops from 
Rutland to Enfield, Conn. In July, 1780, he was sent, for a 
term of four months, as guard at Rutland. He was Sergeant 
in Capt. Earll's Co. in 1777. Before joining this company he 
went, on July 23, as Corporal on the Rhode Island alarm. 

November 22, 1774, he was married in Brookfield to Catherine 
Harper, who was born August 20, 1754, daughter of George 
and Katharen Harper. 

John Forbes died in Oakham, January 3, 1836, aged eighty- 
six years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188. M. S. R., v, 847 (10), (11), 851 (4) 
[Forbs], vi, 205 (11) [Furbush]. Oakham V. R., 30, 72 [Forbush], 119. 
Wore. Co. Prob. Records, May 10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.]. Pay Roll, 
Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

Jonathan Forbes. 

Served as guard at Rutland for a term of eight months begin- 
ning April 20, 1780. 

He was married in Oakham to Jane Dunn, October i, 1789. 
He was living in Oakham in 1801. 

Oakham T. R., i, 255, ii, 431. M, S. R., v, 853 (5) [Forbush]. Oakham 
V. R., 72. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. 

Robert Forbes. 

Born in Rutland in 1751, second son of Arthur and Ruth (Lamond) 
Forbes. 

He was a Private in Capt. Joseph Cutler's company of volun- 
teers, raised in Western (now Warren) and Oakham, which 
marched September 24, 1777, to join the army under General 
Gates. He has credit also on the town records for a term of 
two months in Rhode Island in 1777. 

In 1776 he bought, for £15, forty acres of land in Oakham, 
in the southerly part of Lot No. 16. 



86 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

March 2, 1775, he married Agnes, daughter of James and 
Martha (Crawford) Bell, and had three children, Arthur, Aaron, 
and Christian. 

He died in Oakham, March 4, 1793, aged forty-two years. His 
will was filed in 1799. Some years after his death, his widow 
and children removed to the state of New York. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 189. M. S. R., v, 848 (6). Oakham V. R., 72, 
119. Crawford Family of Oakham, 9. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, May 
10, 1773 [Arthur Forbes, Sr.], 1799 [Robert Forbes]. Wore. Co. Reg. 
of Deeds, Ixxxi, 526. 

Benjamin Foster. 

Served as Private, August 3, 1776, to February 17, 1777, in 
Capt. Nathan Hamilton's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., at 
Ticonderoga Mills, and as Corporal in Capt. Crawford's com- 
pany on the Rhode Island and Bennington alarms. From Sep- 
tember 7 to November 29, 1777, he was Corporal in Capt. 
Crawford's Co., Col. Job Cushing's Regt., in the army that 
conquered General Burgoyne. 

June 15, 1774, he bought of John Waldo of Boston, for £110, 
a farm containing ninety-two acres in Lot T, which included 
the farm owned by the late Elbridge Mullett. 

Benjamin Foster was probably a brother of Ebenezer and 
Skelton Foster. He was married in Rutland April 8, 1779, to 
Mrs. Deborah Fitts of Oakham. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171, 188. M. S. R., v, 890 (4). Mass. Archives- 
Various Service, xviii, 25. Oakham V. R., 72. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 

Ixxvii, 155. 

Ebenezer Foster. 

Born in 1733, in Salem, probably in the Middle Precinct, now South 
Danvers. He was son of Ebenezer and Lydia (Felton) Foster, and 
great-grandson of John Foster of Salem. 

When the 4th Worcester County Regiment met for choice of 
officers at Brookfield, May 14, 1776, Lieut. Ebenezer Foster was 
recommended for Adjutant of the regiment. By official record 
of a ballot by the House of Representatives, June 5, 1776, he 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 87 

was chosen Adjutant. This action was concurred in by the 
Council the same day. His commission was dated June 4, 1776. 
The whole regiment was not at any time ordered into active serv- 
ice, but detachments from it were sent on the different cam- 
paigns, and the services of the field officers were indispensable in 
filling the quotas required of the several towns from which this 
regiment was made up. 

He came with his father to Rutland in 1744; served as a 
soldier under Col. John Murray in the expedition to Crown 
Point in 1755 ; removed from Rutland to Oakham, and on 
March 26, 1756, purchased of Sheers Berry, for £85, one hundred 
acres, being the southern part of Lot No. 8. He was Moderator 
of the Precinct meetings in 1759 and 1761, and Moderator of the 
town meetings in 1780, 1781 and 1785, Clerk of the Precinct in 
1759, and Selectman of the town for fifteen years. He kept the 
Foster tavern from 1761 or earlier to 1809. This was situated 
on the county road from Rutland to Hadley, later the Sixth 
Massachusetts Turnpike, at the place long occupied by David 
Nye and his son, William A. Nye. 

Ebenezer Foster was married, December i, 1757, to Hannah 
Parlin of Concord, who died February 22, 1808. Children, born 
in Oakham: Hannah, August 28, 1759, died March 9, 1761 ; 
Lydia, February 3, 1760; Joseph, March 25, 1762; Alpheus, 
May 23, 1764; Zadock, February i, 1767; Ebenezer, August 12, 
1769; William, March 8, 1774; Benjamin, August 14, 1776; 
Molly, January 4, 1779; Spencer, May 26, 1781. 

William removed to New Braintree and later to New York 
State. His son Charles, who removed to Ohio, was father of 
Charles Foster, born near Tiffin, Ohio, April 12, 1828, Member of 
Congress from Ohio from 1870 to 1876, and Governor of Ohio 
from 1880 to 1884. 

Ebenezer Foster died in New Braintree, March 19, 181 1, aged 
seventy-nine years. 

M. S. R., V, 895 (10). Oakham V. R., 26, 27, 119, 120. New Braintree 
V. R., 23, 83. Morris, Ancestry of Lydia Foster, 5, 7, 8, 9 [Feb. 28, 1808, 
should be Feb. 22. March 9, 1760, should be 1761]. Records, Wore. Co. 
Court of Sessions, 1761-1809. Who's Who in America (1901-02), 393 
[1888 should be 1828]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xxxix, 73. 



88 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Skelton Foster. 

Bom in Salem, son of Ebenezer Foster, who married, December ii, 
1731, Lydia, daughter of Skelton and Hepsibah (Sheldon) Felton, and 
brother of Ebenezer Foster, the innholder of Oakham. 

He marched with the Oakham company on the Bennington 
alarm, August 20, 1777. 

In 1774 he owned land east of the Tomlinson farm. In 1777 
he purchased of Daniel Henderson of Oakham one hundred and 
eight acres. He married Hannah Hinds of Rutland in 1766. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., v, 931 (4). Morris, Ancestry of Lydia 
Foster, 7, 8. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xcii, 510, ci, 59. 

Stephen Foster. 
Enlisted from Oakham, May 2, 1775, as a Private in Capt. 
Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., for a term of eight months. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., v, 931 (8). 

Asa French. 

Born in Berkley, Mass., October 28, 1740, son of John French who died 
in Oakham, August 5, 1794, aged ninety-five years, and brother of John 
French, 2d, who married Hayden Shaw of Middleboro July 24, 1764, 
and came to Oakham after 1790. He served in the French and Indian 
War at Fort Henry in 1757 as a Private in Capt. Benjamin Pratt's Co., 
which was raised in Middleboro. 

He was elected Second Lieutenant when the 4th Worcester 
County Regiment was organized at Brookfield, May 14, 1776; 
commission dated May 31, 1776. He was sent with ten men from 
the Oakham company in 1776, and served with them in Col. 
James Converse's regiment for two months at Dobbs Ferry, 
Tarrytown and North Castle, N. Y. On account of the illness 
of Capt. How and Lieut. Packard, the command of the company 
devolved upon Lieut. French. In September, 1777, he served 
as Sergeant under Lieut. Alexander Bothwell, in Capt. Cutler's 
Co. at the Northward. 

Asa French came to Oakham from Middleboro. September 
6, 1768, he purchased of Jonathan Bullard, for i6o, one hundred 
and forty-three acres in the northerly part of Lot No. 19, on 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 89 

which he lived till his death; this was the Charles Clark place. 
Mr, French taught in the schools of Oakham, and was Selectman 
of the town five years. 

He was married (i) October 24, 1765, to Anne Smith 
of Middleboro, who died April 6, 1802; (2) in 1803, to Widow 
Thankful (Bangs) Thrasher of New Braintree, who died Feb- 
ruary 18, 1806; (3) in 1806, to Abigail Stone of Oakham, who 
died July 4, 1825, aged seventy-three years. Children: Samuel, 
bom October 3, 1766, removed to Craftsbury, Vt., in 1795 ; 
Susannah, born February 22, 1769, married Samuel Brewer of 
Spencer; John, 3d, born December 16, 1771 ; Bathsheba, born 
February 17, 1774, married (i) Philo Sanford of Medway in 
1835, (2) Daniel Moulton of Spencer; Asa, Jr., born March 
17, 1777. 

John French, 3d, son of Asa, married his cousin Betsy French, 
April 25, 1804. Children, born in Oakham : Ann, April 22, 1806; 
Erastus S., January 7, 1808; Mary, May 4, 1810; Anson H., 
August 6, 1813. He removed to North Brookfield in 1833. 

Asa French, Jr., married Hannah Brimhall in 1801, and had 
four children, born at Oakham: Freman, June 5, 1805; Eliza, 
May I, 1807; Cyrus, October 15, 1809, died August 12, 1844, at 
Brookfield; and one child, September i, 1812, who died young. 

Lieut. Asa French died in Oakham December 3, 1832, aged 
ninety-two years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 189, 228, 229. M. S. R., vi, 26 (5) [Freanch], 60 

(13) [ French], 63 (2). Oakham V. R., 27, ^j,, 120. Spencer V. R., 

157. Brookfield V. R., 485. Middleboro Town Clerk's Records. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, Iviii, 511. Weston, Hist, of Middleboro, 92, 93, 98. 
Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, ii, 87. John Robinson's Notes. Gravestone 
Record in Pine Grove Cemetery. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Temple, 
Hist, of No. Brookfield, 593. Spy, Sept. 10, 1794. U. S. Census (1790), 
Mass., 173 [John French]. French Family Records in possession of Miss 
Mary A. French of North Brookfield, Mass. Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 
1776. Affidavit of John Forbes. See John Crawford, p. 70. 

Jabez Fuller. 

Enlisted for the term of three years in the Continental Army 
on or before March 14, 1777, and joined Capt. Holden's Co., 



90 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Col. Nixon's Regt. He died October i6, 1777, probably as the 
result of wounds received in the battle of Saratoga. 

He was one of the signers of the petition of June 23, 1773, for 
the organization of a Congregational church in Oakham. 

Jabez, Thomas, and Elisabeth, children of Jabez and Ruth 
Fuller, were baptized in Oakham, August 8, 1773. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., vi, 163 (8). Oakham Church Records, 
i, I. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. 

Elijah Gilbert. 

Marched in the Oakham Co. as a Private with Capt. John 
Crawford, August 20, 1777, on the Bennington alarm. 

M. S. R., vi, 405 (7) [Gilbart]. 

Moses Gilbert. 

Served two months at Roxbury for the town of Oakham, 
and receipted, February 15, 1776, for ammunition to Capt. 
Barnabas Sears. 

In 1773, he bought of Alexander Wilson, for £34, thirty-three 
acres and one hundred rods in Lot No. 18. 

Moses Gilbert was son of David Gilbert of New Braintree, 
and was by occupation a housewright. September 4, 1774, he 
and his wife owned the baptismal covenant and their son James 
was baptized. A daughter Molly was baptized August 13, 1775. 

June 22, 1786, when a citizen of Putney, Vt., he was married 
for a second time in Rutland to Anna Hayden, sister of Joel 
Hayden, formerly of Oakham but then living in Rutland. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., vi, 416 (i). Oakham V. R., 74 [June 
22, i786]=Rutland V. R., 143 [Jan. 22, 1786]. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. 
Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ivii, 258, Ixxviii, 
212, See Joel Hayden, p. 97. 

Thomas Gill. 

Born in Oakham, March 8, 1756, probably the son of Thomas Gill 
of Leicester, who married Janet Mclntyre of Rutland in 1746, and in 
1750 bought of Alexander Mcl^arland, for £48 6s., eighty and one-half 
acres in Lot No. 10. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 9 1 

He enlisted from Oakham, July i, 1775, in Capt. Seth Wash- 
bum's Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Re^., for a term of eight 
months at Roxbury. He served eight months from June 11, 1777, 
for the town of Spencer in Capt. Benjamin Gates's Co., Col. R. 
Putnam's Regt., giving his residence as Oakham ; and again, for 
his own town, in Capt. Joel Green's Co., Col Ezra Wood's Regt., 
from June i, 1778, to January 31, 1779, at Peekskill and White 
Plains. He joined Capt. Thomas Whipple's company of guards 
at Rutland to serve from April 20, 1780, to December 20, 1780, 
but on July 7, 1780, he enlisted in the Continental Army for six 
months ; farmer, age 24, stature 5 feet 8, complexion light. He 
was discharged November 11, 1780, and was again engaged for 
the town of Oakham February 7, 1781, for service in the Con- 
tinental Army, in Capt. Garfield's Co., Col. Rice's Regt., for the 
term of three years, receiving a town bounty of three hundred 
silver dollars. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 180, 251, 262. M. S. R., vi, 443 (6). Oakham 
V. R., 28. Rutland V. R., 144. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xxx, 204. 



Joseph Gilles. 

Enlisted from Oakham, May 2, 1775, as a Private in Capt. 
Simeon Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., for the term of 
eight months at Roxbury. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., vi, 448 (7). 452 (7) [Gillis]. 



Jonathan Glazier. 

Bom May 13, 1751, in Hardwick, son of Isaiah and Hannah (Thomas) 
Glazier. 

He was a Private in Capt. John Crawford's company, raised 
in Hardwick, Oakham and New Braintree for service in the 
Stillwater campaign ; enlisted for the town of Oakham, Septem- 
ber 29, 1777, discharged November 29, 1777. He also served 
for the town of Hardwick in Capt. Dexter's Co., Col. Learned's 
Regt., and was in camp at Roxbury in January, 1776. 



92 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

He married Azubah, daughter of Caleb and Hannah (Bod- 
fish) Nye, June 23, 1774. 

He lived many years in Oakham in a house near the residence 
of Jonas Rich, and was one of the heads of families in Oakham 
in 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189. M. S. R., vi, 481 (5) [Glaizer], 487 (8). Letter 
of Miss Emily K. Fobes of Worcester. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1765. 
U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Paige, Hist, of Hardwick, 383, 384. 
Nye Genealogy, 90 [June 23=27]. 

The Green Family. 

Patrick Green married, in Rutland, Nellie, daughter of Robert 
McMains, March 4, 1741. In 1743 he received from his father- 
in-law ninety-six acres in Lot. No. 32, consideration "Parental 
Love and Affection for Eleanor, my daughter, Wife of Patrick 
Green." He was one of the first ten settlers of Oakham, and 
lived on the south side of the county road from Rutland to 
Hadley, a few rods southeast of the house in which William 
Gaffney now lives. He was Precinct Treasurer in 1760 and 
1761. William and Bartholomew Green were his sons. 

Rutland V. R., 146 [Greene]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xxiii, 82. 

Bartholomew Green. 

Was Private in Capt. Samuel Dexter's Co., Col. Learned's 
Regt., raised in Hardwick, New Braintree and Oakham for six 
months' service in the siege of Boston. He enlisted for a term 
of two months at Dorchester, and receipted for ammunition to 
Capt. Barnabas Sears February 15, 1776. He enlisted again in 
Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., for service in Rhode Island 
from July 2, 1777, to January 4, 1778. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188. M. S. R., vi, 795 (n)- 

John Green. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham for the term of three years 
in the Continental Army at Brookfield, September 15, 1775* 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 93 

residence Oakham, and was in Capt. Goodale's Co., Col. Rufus 
Putnam's Regt. He reenlisted and served till January, 1781. 
In 1777 his residence was given as Gorham. 

Lydia, daughter of John Green of Oakham, was baptized in 
Rutland, August 7, 1763. 

M. S. R., vi, 814 (10) [Oakham also given Gorham]. Rutland V. R., 48. 



William Green. 

Private in Capt. Joseph Cutler's company of volunteers, raised 
in Western (now Warren) and Oakham, which marched Sep- 
tember 24, 1777, to join the army of General Gates at the 
Northward. 

In 1766 he purchased, for £37 12s., ninety-four acres in the 
northeast part of Lot No. 32. In 1793 he sold to Jeptha Ripley, 
for £410, ninety-eight acres north of the county road, with all the 
buildings thereon. He was Selectman of Oakham in 1778 and 
1779, Town Clerk in 1780, and was on the Committee of Cor- 
respondence, Inspection and Safety in 1777. He kept an inn 
from 1776 till 1784 and was living in Oakham in 1790. 

His wife's name was Sarah. Children, born in Oakham : Wil- 
liam, February 12, 1765; Benjamin, March 26, 1767; Sarah, 
March 2, 1769; Azubah, April 15, 1771 ; Alpha, November 12, 
1773; Joseph, March 23, 1776; Patty, October 9, 1778, died 
September 7, 1781 ; Marcy, August 19, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189. M. S. R., vi, 841 (5). Oakham V. R., 29, 121. 
U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Records, Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, 
1777-1784. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ivi, 481, cxix, 236, 



Robert Hair. 

Robert Hair enlisted, on August i, 1777, as a Private, age 15, 
in Capt. Ralph Earll's Co., Col. Danforth Keyes's Regt., for 
service in Rhode Island. A roll dated Camp Providence, Sep- 
tember I, and sworn to in Worcester County, gives him credit 



94 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

for one month's service. On November 21, the following 
advertisement appeared in the Massachusetts Spy: 

"Deserted from my company in Col. Danforth Keyes regiment, Robert 
Hair, 15 yrs of age, 5 ft high, belonging to Oakham in the County of 
Worcester. Whoever shall take up said deserter and confine him in some 
Goal in the state or return him to his regiment shall have $5.00 reward 
and all necessary charges paid by me. 

Ralph Earle, Capt. 

Little Compton, Oct. 31, 1777." 

That the young lad returned to the service, and did his best 
to Hve down his earlier reputation would seem to be established 
by a receipt dated at Springfield November 9, 1782, which states 
that Robert Hair had been accepted as a Continental Soldier for 
a term of three years from the town of Charlton. 

M. S. R., vii, 41 (2), (3). Spy, Nov. 2I, 1777. 

Zaccheus Hall, Jr. 

Enlisted as a Private in Capt. Samuel Dexter's Co., which was 
raised in Hardwick, New Braintree and Oakham and formed part 
of Col. Learned's Regt., which went into camp at Roxbury on 
May 19, 1775. July 10, 1777, he again enlisted, for the town of 
Oakham, in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., and served 
five months and twenty-five days in Rhode Island. Before join- 
ing this regiment, he marched on the Rhode Island alarm in the 
New Braintree company. 

He was married in New Braintree, October 28, 1784, to 
Susanna Adams. His father, Zaccheus Hall, died in New 
Braintree, July 15, 1772. 

M. S. R., vii, 119 (4), (5), (6). New Braintree V. R., 88, 141. 

John Harmon. 

Has credit on the town records for three months' service in 
New York, in 1776. 

He came from Western (Warren) and purchased in 1771 from 
George Black one hundred and ten acres in Lot No. 23, the 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 95 

northerly part. This included part of the Clayton Adams farm 
south of the town road. 

In 1772 he was married to Mary White of Warren. "Decem- 
ber 3, 1775, John Harmon & wife owned ye Govt, at ye own 
home (having been propounded as usual) on accouiit of ye 
children's sickness. Their child baptized," 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. Warren V. R., no. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixvii, 148. 



Benjamin Harper. 

Born August 18, 1762, son of George and Catherine Harper, and twin 
brother of Joseph. His father was one of ,the first ten settlers of 
Oakham, was Moderator in 1764 and in 1765, Assessor in 1760, 1762 
and 1763, Collector in 1762, 1763 and 1764, and Selectman in 1762 and 
1763. 

Benjamin Harper was a Private in Capt. Ralph Earll's Co., 
Col. Keyes's Regt., having enlisted August 20, 1777, for service 
in Rhode Island, from which he was discharged January 4, 1778. 
August 2, 1778, he enlisted in Capt. Gilbert's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt., for a term of one month at Rhode Island. 
From March 6 to April 23, 1780, he was a member of Capt. 
Ephraim Hartwell's company of guards at Rutland. July 7, 1780, 
he enlisted in the Continental Army for six months ; occupation 
farmer, age 18, stature 5 feet 8, complexion light. He was dis- 
charged December 16, 1780, and reelisted again in the Continen- 
tal Army March 18, 1781, for three years, receiving as a bounty 
three hundred silver dollars. 

Oakham T. R., i, 251, 261. M. S. R., vii, 308 (8), (9), (10), (11). 
Oakham V. R., 30 [Aug. 18, 17—]. 



Georg-e Harper. 

Born August 29, 1758, fourth son of George and Catherine Harper. 

George Harper was a Private in Capt. Ezekiel Knowlton's Co., 
Col. Dike's Regt., stationed in 1776 at Dorchester Heights. 



g6 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

July 23, 1777, he marched with Capt. Crawford on the Rhode 
Island alarm. October 19, 1779, he enlisted in Capt. Joseph 
Richardson's Co., Col. Samuel Denny's Regt. The company was 
raised for three months' service at Claverack. He has also 
credit on the town records for service in Rhode Island, in Capt. 
Earll's Co., in 1777. 

September 18, 1783, he was married to Ruth Wolcott of New 
Braintree. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188, 242. M. S. R., vii, 308 (13). Oakham 
V. R., 30, 77- 

John Harper. 

Born April 28, 1744, eldest son of George and Catherine Harper. 

John Harper marched on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 
1777. Two months later he was with Capt. Crawford in the 
Stillwater campaign, having enlisted September 7, 1777, to serve 
till November 30. In 1780 he enlisted in the Continental Army 
for six months; age 36, stature 5 feet 11, complexion ruddy. 
He marched from home July 6, was stationed at West Point, and 
was discharged January 15, 1781. He was probably also in Capt. 
John Howard's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., at Ticonderoga, 
in 1776. 

In 1775 he owned the north half of Lot No. 11, that is, all 
the land in the lot north of the Tomlinson farm and including 
that part of the present village site north of Maple Street. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 251. M. S. R., vii, 309 (s), (7). Oakham 
V. R., 30. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxv, 309. 



Joseph Harper. 

Born August 18, 1762, son of George and Catherine Harper, and 
twin brother of Benjamin. 

Joseph Harper was a Private in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's 
Regt., in which he enlisted August i, 1777, and served in Rhode 
Island till January 4, 1778. From March 30 to July 2, 1778, he 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 97 

was in Capt. Thomas Whipple's company of guards at Rutland. 
August 2, 1778, he enlisted in Capt. Gilbert's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt., for a term of one month in Rhode Island. July 
7, 1780, he enlisted in the Continental Army for six months; age 
18, stature 5 feet 8, complexion dark. He was discharged Decem- 
ber 16, 1780. 

He married Abigail Bacon of New Braintree December 13, 
1781. 

Oakham T. R., i, 251. M. S. R., vii, 309 (10). (11), 310 (2), viii, 256 
(9) [Horper]. Oakham V. R., 30 [Aug. 18, 17—], ^^. 

Robert Harper. 

Born February 12, 1748, third son of George and Catherine Harper. 

Robert Harper was a Private in Capt. Washburn's Co., Col. 
Ward's Regt., having enlisted July i, 1775, for a term of eight 
months at Cambridge and Roxbury. He marched with Capt. 
Crawford's company on the Rhode Island and Bennington alarms 
in 1777, and was detailed in 1778 to join Col. Gerrish's regiment 
of guards which escorted the troops of the Saratoga Convention 
from Rutland to Enfield, Conn. In 1781 he enlisted for the 
term of three months in Capt. John Cutler's Co., Col. Luke 
Drury's Regt., marched from home August 27, 1781, and joined 
the regiment at West Point September 3. He was discharged 
November 24. 

In 1766 he married Sarah McFarland, daughter of Alexander 
McFarland, one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188, 214, 280. M. S. R., vii, 310 (5)- Oak- 
ham V. R., 30. ^T. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1776 [Alexander 
McFarland] . 

Joel Hayden. 

Born February 21, 1756, in Sudbury, Mass., son of Moses and 
Priscilla (Goodenow) Hayden. 

Joel Hayden was one of the minutemen who marched from 
Oakham on the alarm of April 19, 1775. In 1776 he went with 

7 



98 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Col. Samuel Brewer's regiment in the Ticonderoga campaign, and 
enlisted again August 12, 1777, to serve till January 2, 1778, at 
Providence. In 1779 he entered the Continental Army for three 
years, giving his residence as Oakham and engaging for the tow^n 
of Northfield. 

Mr. Hayden v^as an intimate friend of the Craiges and was 
residuary legatee, with Daniel Parmenter, of Joseph Craige's 
estate. After Joseph Craige's death in 1781, he was innholder in 
Oakham till the Craige property was purchased by Richard 
Kelley. In 1783 he removed to Rutland, where he had purchased 
a farm of fifty-four acres. He was living in Rutland in 1786. 
The only head of a family by the name of Joel Hayden living 
in Massachusetts in 1790 resided in Blandford. 

Early in 1777, he was married to Lucy Flint, daughter of 
Thomas and Eunice (How) Flint, and sister of John Flint who 
came from Rutland to Oakham in 1779. Lucy Flint was born in 
Rutland, January 31, 1757. They had four children: Patty, born 
May 28, 1777, died July 11, 1778; Joseph, born January 16, 
1779; Joel, born November 24, 1780; Charlotte, born June 12, 
1782. His son Joel was born in Putney, Vt. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., vii, 13 (12) [Haden], 533 (11) 
[Hatoii], 587 (s), (7). Oakham V. R., 31, 79, 122. Rutland V. R., 42. 
Sudbury V. R., 63, 211. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 103. Records, 
Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, 1782. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Aug. 20, 
1781 [Joseph Craige]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxi, 491 [John Flint], 
xcvii, 10, c, 133. See Moses Gilbert, p. 90. 



Daniel Henderson. 

Born September 8, 1746, in Rutland, third son of Lieut. James and 
Sarah Henderson, and brother of David and Jonathan Henderson, 
soldiers in the Revolutionary War, and of Rachel Henderson, the first 
wife of Capt. John Crawford, and of Mary Henderson, the wife of 
William Crawford. His father, James Henderson, was married Decem- 
ber 16, 1736, to Sarah Harper of Concord. He came to Rutland, where 
he bought in 1740 sixty-three acres on Walnut Hill. Mrs. Sarah Hender- 
son died June 25, 1751, and he was again married to Elizabeth Rally 
July 8, 1756. His will was filed April i, 1776. Fourteen children were 
mentioned in the will: James, Rachel, William, Daniel, Mary, Elizabeth, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 99 

David, Jonathan, Edward, Sarah, Josiah, Abner, Joseph, and Susanna. 
In 1759 he served as Second Lieutenant in Capt. Paige's Co. on the 
expedition to Crown Point. 

Daniel Henderson was Sergeant in Capt. John Crawford's 
company of minutemen who marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775. He also enlisted August 27, 1777, as a Private in Capt. 
Ralph Earll's Co., Col. Danforth Keyes's Regt., and served four 
months and eight days at Providence. 

August 25, 1766, he was married in Spencer to Sarah Mclntyre 
of that town, and removed to Oakham in the summer of 1768, 

M. S. R., vii, 717 (6), (7). Rutland V. R., 50, 150, 151, 230. Mass. 
Muster Rolls, xcvii, 355, 356. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Apr. i, 1776 
[James Henderson]. Records, Wore. Co. Court of Sessions, Sept. 2, 1768. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xx, 484. Packard Family (MS.) by Mr. 
Charles M. Packard of Westboro. 



David Henderson. 

Born in Rutland, fourth son of Lieut. James and Sarah Henderson. 

He enlisted June 5, 1775, in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' 
Regt., for a term of eight months at Roxbury, and served in Capt. 
Nathan Hamilton's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., at Ticon- 
deroga, from August 3, 1776, probably till the following Feb- 
ruary. He enlisted February 23, 1778, for three years in the 
Continental Army, for the town of Rutland. 

M. S. R., vii, 718 (2). Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Apr. i, 1776 [James 
Henderson]. 

James Henderson, Jr. 

Bom September 22, 1737, in Concord, eldest son of Lieut. James and 
Sarah Henderson, and brother of Daniel, David and Jonathan Henderson. 

James Henderson was Corporal in Capt. David Bent's Co., Col. 
Job Cushing's Regt.; enlisted September 5, 1777; service, two 
months with the Northern Army; discharged October 27, 1777; 
company raised to serve till the last of November. 



lOO SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

In 1758 he bought in Oakham, for £39 5s. 8d., Lot No. 15, 
two hundred and fifty acres; also several acres in Lot BB. In 

1765 he bought of his father-in-law, Alexander McFarland, for 
£4, four and one-half acres in Lot No. 10. 

He was Assessor in the District of Oakham in 1765 and 1766. 
January 19, 1758, he married Rachel McFarland, daughter of 
Alexander McFarland, one of the first ten settlers of Oakham. 

M. S. R., i, 234 (2) [Anderson], vii, 718 (7). Rutland V. R., 151. 
Concord Births, Marriages and Deaths, 157. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 

1766 [Alexander McFarland]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xli, 79, liv, 212. 
Packard Family (see above). 

Jonathan Henderson. 

Born in Rutland, fifth son of Lieut. James Henderson. 

Jonathan Henderson enlisted in the Continental Army at 
Brookfield, September 15, 1777, giving his residence as Oakham, 
and received £20 bounty from the town of Oakham, term of 
service, during the war. January 25, 1778, he was credited to 
the town of Rutland. 

He was married to Esther Dean in 1788. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., vii, 719 (4). Oakham V. R., 79. 
Packard Family (see above). 

Israel Hill. 

EnHsted May 15, 1777, in Capt. Reed's Co., Col. Alden's Regt., 
for a term of three years in the Continental Army. He was 
killed August 25, 1777, while on the expedition for the relief of 
Fort Schuyler. 

The Widow Beriah Hill received from the town of Oakham 
his bounty of i20, April 13, 1778. Notice of her appointment 
as administratrix was published July 9, 1778, and on July 29 his 
estate was sold at auction, consisting of between five and seven 
acres of land lying on the county road from Rutland to Hard- 
wick, with a dwelling house and a frame for a blacksmith shop. 
He had also one pair of blacksmith's bellows, a sledge, vise, tongs, 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR lOl 

and shop tools. In April, 1777, he had forbidden all persons 
trusting his wife on his account, as, besides other and worse 
offences, she had sold many articles of her wearing apparel and 
"had threatened to destroy all his interest." 

Oakham T. R., i, 178. M. S. R., vii, 876 (5). Spy, May 2, 1777, July 
9, 1778. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1777. 



John Hill. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, July 2, 1777, in Capt. Ralph 
Earll's Co., Col. Danforth Keyes's Regt., for six months' service 
in Rhode Island and was appointed Corporal. He was discharged 
January 4, 1778. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., vii, 885 (3). 

Stephen Hill. 

Probably the same as Joseph Hill. Enlisted for the town of 
Oakham in 1779 for the term of nine months in the Continental 
Army; age 20, stature 5 feet 6, complexion light. Mustered in 
July 7, marched July 14. He was in Capt. Redding's Co., Col. 
Bradford's Regt., and was discharged April 9, 1780. 

M. S. R., vii, 892 (5) [Joseph Hill] =904 (2) [Stephen Hill]. 

John Hitchcock. 

Was engaged by the town of Oakham for six months' service 
in the Continental Army in 1780, in response to the Resolve of 
June 5, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 251. M. S. R., vii, 816 (8) [Hichcock]. 

Enos Hudson. 

Bom in Oakham in 1759, the son of Joseph and— Hepsibah Hudson-. 
Joseph Hudson was a clothier who came from Rutland to Oakham in 
1758, and bought of Joseph Craige four acres in what is now Coldbrook. 



I02 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

This piece of land was north of the county road, and between the Craige 
tavern and the Ware River bridge. He was Selectman of Oakham in 
1770, 1775, 1776 and 1777, Assessor in 1762, 1763, 1765, 1770, 1772 and 
1775, Moderator in 1764, Treasurer in 1783, and member of the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1775 and 1776. His estate 
was settled in 1791, when he owned two hundred and twenty-seven acres 
of land, appraised at £2,2>^- 

Enos Hudson was the best soldier furnished by the town of 
Oakham in the Revolution. He enlisted March 11, 1777, at the 
age of eighteen, for a term of three years in the 7th Mass. Regt., 
for service in the Continental Army. He was in the regiment 
commanded by Col. Alden and afterward by Col. Brooks. He 
was appointed Corporal. In March, 1779, he reenlisted, to serve 
during the war. He was engaged in the battles that resulted in 
the surrender of General Burgoyne in 1777, at Cherry Valley 
and Newtown in 1779, at Kingsbridge and in the battles around 
Yorktown that resulted in the surrender of Cornwallis in 1781. 
February 20, 1782, his descriptive list was taken: age 22, 
stature 6 feet, complexion dark, hair brown, occupation farmer, 
birthplace Oakham, residence Oakham. 

February 7, 1783, he was given leave by Col. Jackson to go 
from New Windsor to Worcester for forty days, to visit his 
home, and on March 3, while on furlough, his intention of mar- 
riage to Patie Brown was published in the Oakham meeting- 
house. 

He was discharged June 8, 1783, by General Washington, the 
term of enlistment having expired. He was one of the men in 
Col. Brooks's regiment who were entitled to honorary badges for 
long and faithful service, having been in the Continental Army 
from March 11, 1777, to June 8, 1783. He received one honorary 
stripe. 

After the war, he lived for about six years in Oakham. When 
Father Tomlinson was settled in 1786, he contributed one thou- 
sand feet of closing boards towards building his house. 

On April 17, 1818, when he applied for a pension, he was living 
in Eaton, Madison Co., N. Y., and was fifty-nine years of age. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I03 

In 1820, his wife was sixty-seven years old, and there were two 
grandchildren, one eight years old and the other five. 

Enos Hudson was married to Patie Brown in 1783, and had 
three children, two born in Oakham : Samuel Smead, March 23, 
1784; Rebekah, March 16, 1788; and one in Rutland: Patience, 
May 20, 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., viii, 457 (6), 464 (i) [Zenas Hudson]. 
Oakham V. R., 32, 81. Rutland V. R., 58 [Samuel Smead, Nov. 27, 
I784=baptism]. Pension Application, Apr. 17, 1818. Wore. Co. Prob. 
Records, 1791 [Joseph Hudson]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xlii, 168, 170. 
Subscription Paper for Mr. Tomlinson, May 3, 1786 (MS.). 

Samuel Hunt. 

Born in Oakham in 1764. 

He served as a Private in Capt. Thomas Whipple's company 
of guards from April 20, 1780, to September 20, 1780. The 
company was stationed at Rutland. Mr. Hunt lost his right leg 
in consequence of an injury received while fighting fire in the 
prison barracks. 

Samuel Hunt was a tailor living in Coldbrook, and later had 
a country store there and ran an express between Coldbrook and 
Boston. In 1805 he was in partnership with Caleb Shattuck, and 
in 1824, with Asa French, Jr. He was for some years innkeeper 
in the old Craige tavern. 

In 1803 he married Lydia F. Green of Rutland. She was 
daughter of Joseph Green of Rutland and was baptized February 
I, 1779. Children, born in Oakham: Charles C, September 24, 
1804; Samuel Lyman, May 28, 1810; George Austin, July 13, 
1813; Laura B., May 2, 1820, married Horace E. Chace of 
Paxton. 

Samuel Hunt died in Oakham, January 4, 1840, aged seventy- 
six years. 

M. S. R., viii, 537 (9). Oakham V. R., 32, 81, 123. Rutland V. R., 48. 
Spy, March 27, 1805, March 24, 1824. Worcester Telegram, March 23, 
1910 [Mrs. Laura B. Chace]. 



104 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

James Hunter. 

Enlisted for a term of two months at Roxbury and Dorchester, 
and receipted for ammunition to Capt. Barnabas Sears, February 
15, 1776. He marched as Private with Capt. Crawford on the 
Rhode Island and Bennington alarms, and was Corporal in Capt. 
Joseph Cutler's company of volunteers raised in Western (now 
Warren) and Oakham for service in the Northern Department, 
which marched September 24, 1777, to join the army under 
General Gates. 

James Hunter of New Braintree was married, April 13, 1769, 
to Sarah Hall. In 1774 he bought of his brother, William 
Hunter, for i200, one hundred acres, the south half of Lot 
No. II, including all the land in the present village south of 
Maple Street. Here he lived till 1786, when he sold his farm 
to Rev. Daniel Tomlinson, to whose descendants it still belongs, 
and removed to Pelham, Mass. He was Warden of the town 
of Oakham in 1775, and member of the Committee of Corre- 
spondence, Inspection and Safety in 1779. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188, 189. M. S. R., viii, 548 (5), (7). New 
Braintree V. R., 94. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 120. Wore. Co. Reg. 
of Deeds, ci, 58, 59. 

Oliver Jackson. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, May 2, 1775, in Capt. Hazel- 
tine's Co., Col. John Fellows' Regt., for term of eight months 
at Roxbury. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., viii, 684 (2). 

Abraham Joslin. 

Marched with Capt. Crawford on the alarm at Rhode Island, 
July 23, 1777, and on the alarm at Bennington, August 20, 1777. 

He came to Oakham from New Braintree and lived on the road 
from New Braintree to Oakham meeting-house, probably at the 
Boyden place. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I05 

December 9, 1773, he was married in New Braintree to Abigail 
Warner. A daughter Anna was born in New Braintree, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1776. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188. M. S. R., viii, 1000 (8). New Braintree 
V. R., 31, 95. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxix, 439. 



Benjamin Joslin. 

Sergeant in Capt. John Crawford's company of minutemen who 
marched April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington alarm. 

He lived for a short time on the north side of the old road 
leading from New Braintree to the Oakham meeting-house, the 
Charles Keith place. He sold his land in 1776 to James Blair 
and Abraham Joslin. In 1775 he was a member of the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety. 

July 9, 1778, Benjamin Joslin and Persis, his wife, were dis- 
missed to the church in New Braintree. 

M. S. R., viii, ']2'] (12) [Jaslyn]. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, Ixxix, 439, Ixxxiii, 140. 



John Kenny. 

Enlisted from the town of Oakham May 5, 1777, as a Private 
in Capt. Edmund Hodges's Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., 
and served two months and seven days in Rhode Island. 

M. S. R., ix, 125 (11). 

Benjamin Knight. 

Bom in Sudbury, December 2^, 1744, son of Samuel and Anna (Earns) 
Knight and brother of Silas Knight. 

He enlisted in the summer of 1776 for a term of two months at 
Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and North Castle, with Lieut. Asa 
French. 



I06 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

In 1773 he bought, for iioo, seventy acres in the southwesterly 
part of Lot No. 18, bounded on the north by the land of Alex- 
ander Wilson. This was the Brimhall place. He was one of the 
signers of the petition of June 23, 1773, for the organization of 
the Congregational Church. 

His wife's name was Hannah. They had four children, born 
in Oakham: Joseph, November 26, 1772; Molly, June 23, 1774; 
Betty, February 9, 1776; Benjamin, September 28, 1777. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. Oakham V. R., 34, 35. Sudbury V. R., 83, 228. 
Oakham Church Records, i, i. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxiii, 185. 
Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 

Silas Knight. 

Born in Sudbury, May 5, 1757, son of Samuel and Anna (Earns) 
Knight. 

He enlisted for the town of Sudbury June 28, 1776, and served 
till December i, 1776, at Camp Hull and Castle Island. Septem- 
ber 28, 1777, he again enlisted and served forty-one days with the 
Northern Army. 

He came to Oakham about 1780 and lived in a house east of 
the Brimhall farm, on an old private road that ran in a northerly 
direction from the corner near the house of Isaac Stone, 2d. 
This road ran near a house on Bullard Hill, crossed the county 
road from Rutland to Hardwick near Phineas Bullard's and 
joined the Coldbrook road near the house of the late Capt. Sum- 
ner Barr. Silas Knight's house was burned in 1802. Deacon 
James Allen remembered going to this fire when he was ten years 
old. 

He married Martha Goodenough, May 12, 1782. Children, 
born in Oakham: Silas, Jr., October 22, 1782; Mary, March 
7, 1784; Perces, August 18, 1786; David, August 22, 1788; 
Pattie, January 26, 1790; Arathusa, November 29, 1791 ; Hiram, 
August 22, 1793; Ann, May 6, 1795; Prince, April 17, 1798; 
Benjamin Franklin, March 12, 1800; Thomas Jefferson, Jan- 
uary 29, 1803. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR IO7 

Silas Knight died between July 30 and October 4, 1842. 
He was grandfather of Charles S. Knight and great-grandfather 
of James A. Knight, both of whom served in the Civil War in 
the 42d Massachusetts Infantry. 

M. S. R., ix, 355 (4). Oakham V. R., 34, 35, 124. Sudbury V. R., 83, 
228. Note of Dea. Jesse Allen. 



Jacob Kubler. 

Enlisted March 30, 1778, as a Private in Capt. Thomas 
Whipple's Co., Col. Abijah Stearns' Regt., to serve till July 2, 
1778, guarding troops of the Saratoga Convention at Rutland. 
He has also credit on the town records for a campaign to Boston, 
beginning July i, 1778. 

June 15, 1777, he was married in Sudbury to Susanna Hayden, 
aunt of Joel Hayden and sister of Mrs. Isaiah Parnienter. He 
came to Oakham the same year and bought for £78 fifty-five acres 
and a house in Lot No. 29, on the north side of the county road 
leading from Rutland to Hardwick. In 1793 he was living 
(probably in this house) east of William Green's farm, which was 
then sold to Jeptha Ripley. His will was filed December 23, 
1796. He gave to his wife, who was appointed executrix, his 
"whole estate, both real and personal," from which it appears 
that he had no descendants. His widow died January 6, 1810, 
aged seventy-three. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189. M. S. R., ix, 398 (7) [Kubelor]. Oakham V. R., 
124 [Kibley]. Sudbury V. R., 227 [Kibler]. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 
Dec. 23, 1796 [Kublear]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, cvi, 390, cxix, 236. 

Loved Lincoln. 

Born August 26, 1758, in Rehoboth, son of Nathaniel, Jr., and Elizabeth 
(Robinson) Lincoln, and brother of Stephen Lincoln. 

He enHsted May i, 1775, as a Private in Capt. Grainger's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Learned's Regt. In May, 1778, he was enlisted by 
Capt. Crawford for the Continental Army for the term of nine 



Io8 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

months, agreeably to the resolve of April 20, 1778; age 19, stature 
6 feet, complexion dark. It is stated on the town records that 
he was "hired by the four Bells." He was assigned to Capt. 
Cavenagh's company in the detachment under Major Weeks, 
and was later transferred to Capt. Jones' company of Col. Lamb's 
New York Artillery. He was probably an artillery driver. 
In his application for a pension, he stated that he "was at 
Terra Town when that place was attacked, and retreated to 
White Plain September 12, 1778." 

Loved Lincoln came to New Braintree with his father in 1759. 
Sometime after the close of the war, he settled in Lewiston, 
Maine. He was twice married : ( i ) to a young woman in New 
Braintree, who died January 19, 1805 ; (2) to Betsey, daughter 
of Jonathan Hodgkin of Lewiston, who was bom in 1774. 
Children: Charlotte, married a Mr. Thompson, died August 7, 
1812; Nathaniel, lived in Bath, Me.; Cyrus; Betsey, born 1797; 
Lurany ; Sally ; Levi ; Ruf us. Six other children died young. 

Cyrus was a Lieutenant in the War of 1812, and was taken 
prisoner when on board the Growler in June, 181 3, on the 
Sorrel River, near Lake Champlain. He was kept a prisoner 
at Quebec and Halifax until the close of the war. He lived in 
Bath, Maine, and had four children. 

Loved Lincoln died in Lewiston April 9, 1850, aged ninety-two 
years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 190. M. S. R., ix, 796 (s) [Linclon], 813 (s), 824 (7) 
[Lincon], 837 (14) [Linkhorn]. Note of Dea. Horace Lincoln of Oak- 
ham. Pension Application, Apr. 12, 1818. N. E. Gen. & Ant. Reg., iv 
(1850), 293 [Lovell Lincoln]. Morris, Stephen Lincoln of Oakham, Mass., 
10, 20. Letter of Professor G. M. Chase of Lewiston. 



Stephen Lincoln. 

Born in Rehoboth, December 3, 1751, son of Nathaniel, Jr., and 
Elizabeth (Robinson) Lincoln. His mother was daughter of Increase, 
Jr., and Mehitabel (Williams) Robinson. His father, Nathaniel, Jr., was a 
descendant in the fifth generation of Thomas Lincoln, who came from 
England in 1635, settled in Hingham, and removed before 1650 to 
Taunton. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I09 

He has credit on the town records for six months' service in 
Rhode Island, beginning in August, 1778. 

He came from Taunton to New Braintree in 1759, and removed 
a few years later to Oakham, He built a log house on Bogle 
Hill, in which his first two children were born. March 6, 1783, 
he purchased of the estate of Silas Hill, for £201, ninety-two 
acres, with house, barn, shoemaker's shop, bark house and tan 
yard, to which he added by subsequent purchase one hundred 
acres more. About 1800 he built the large house now belonging 
to Arthur and Francena Spooner. Here he lived till his 
death, March 16, 1840. He was chosen Chorister June 17, 1779, 
was Warden in 1784, and Selectman in 1791 and 1798. 

April 29, 1779, he married Lydia Foster, daughter of Lieut. 
Ebenezer Foster. Children, born in Oakham: Abner, February 
II, 1780; Hannah, September 25, 1781 ; Lydia, March 2, 1784; 
Lucy, October 23, 1786; Betsy, September 7, 1788; Levi, 
November 3, 1790; Stephen, Jr., November 29, 1792; Sally, May 
I9> 1795 j Justus, May 20, 1797; Mary, December 17, 1799; 
Louisa, February 3, 1803. A full acount of his ancestry and 
descendants was published by John E. Morris in 1895. At that 
time his descendants numbered nearly four hundred. 

Oakham T. R., i, 214. Oakham V. R., 26, 2)^, 84, 124 [84 years should 

be 89]. Morris, Stephen Lincoln, 5, 17, 19, 36-38. Morris, Ancestry of 

Lydia Foster, 8, 9. Oakham Church Records i, 6. Recollections of Mr. 
Stephen Lincoln. 

John Macomber. 

Born May 18, 1760, in Taunton, Mass., son of John and Abigail 
(Padelford) Macomber, and descendant in the fifth generation of John 
Macomber who was in Taunton in 1643. 

In the autumn of 1776, he was a private in Capt. Joshua 
Wilbore's Co., Col. Ebenezer Francis's Regt. He probably 
served from March i to May i, 1778, at the Fort at Dartmouth, 
and also in the summer of 1780 in Rhode Island, in Capt. 
Barnabas Doty's Co., Lieut. Col. White's Regt. He is said to 
have been made deaf in the war. 



no. SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

John Macomber came from Taunton to Oakham before 1795, 
and removed from Oakham to Westford, Vt., not later than 
1821, when he and his wife united with the Congregational 
Church in that place. 

August 25, 1785, he was married to Mary, daughter of Calvin 
Dean. She was born March 23, 1767, and died at Westford, 
November 29, 1823. After her death he was again married, 
December 8, 1825, to Betsey Robinson. He was the father of 
twelve children, the first four born in Taunton, the others in 
Oakham: Calvin Dean, June 7, 1786, died in Oakham, October 
30, 1829; Betsey, September 3, 1788; Mary, August 16, 1790, 
married Samuel Thresher, Jr., of New Braintree, March 14, 
1815; Abigail G., June 17, 1792; Harriet, February 11, 1795, 
married (i) Harvey Fales, March 26, 1816, who died in Oak- 
ham, April 3, 1836, (2) Levi Howe of Shrewsbury, February 11, 
1845; John Jarvis, November 11, 1786; Lydia, December 11, 
1798, died September 11, 1815; Pliny, October 13, 1800, died 
December 11, 1815; Lewis, June 2, 1803, died May 25, 1825, at 
Millidgeville, Ga. ; Philip, October 15, 1805, died December 13, 
1813 ; Luther, December 13, 1808, married Eliza Crawford, 
April II, 1833; Sumner, June 17, 181 1. 

John Jarvis was married, January 17, 1828, to Abigail, daugh- 
ter of Jonathan and Susan (Crawford) Packard, and had thirteen 
children, five of whom were soldiers in the Civil War. 

John Macomber, the Revolutionary soldier, died in Westford, 
Vt., October 11, 1841, at the age of eighty-one years. 

Oakham V. R., 2)7, 40, 70, 86, 118, 125 [Pliny=Ryna]. Macomber Gene- 
alogy, 24, 25, 37 [Oct. 30=0ct. 3]. Oakham T. R., ii, 360. M. S. R., x, 
120 (8), 121 (2), (3). 

Aaron McCobb. 

Eldest son of William and Mary (Crawford) McCobb, and nephew 
of Alexander Crawford, one of the first settlers of Oakham. He was 
born in Rutland, but was living in Oakham at the beginning of the war. 

. He enlisted for the town of Oakham, May 2, 1775, in Capt. 
Simeon Hazeltine's company of the 8th Regiment, commanded 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR III 

by Col. Fellows, and received a bounty coat at Dorchester, 
November 27 of the same year. On March 10, 1777, he 
enlisted in the Continental Army from Rutland, for three years, 
in Capt. Wheeler's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt., and died in the service 
February 27, 1778. 

M. S. R., X, 441 (4). Crawford Family of Oakham, 10. 



Alexander McFarland, Jr. 

Son of Alexander McFarland, one of the first ten settlers of Oakham, 
who in 1742 bought two hundred acres in Lot No. 10 for £250, who 
married Jean Harper, daughter of William Harper, also one of the first 
ten settlers of Oakham, and who served as Selectman in 1761 and 1763. 

He enlisted May 10, 1775, as Private in Capt. Seth Washburn's 
Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Regt., and was in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., x, 480 (6). Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 
1766 [Alexander McFarland], Oct. 31, 1774 [William Harper]. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, xv, 341. 



Reuben McFarland. 

Born December 4, 1759, son of Alexander and Jean (Harper) McFar- 
land, and grandson of William Harper, one of the first settlers of 
Oakham. 

He was Private in Capt. Newell's company, which was 
detached November 3, 1778, from General Warner's brigade to 
join Col. Gerrish's regiment of guards and escort troops of the 
Saratoga Convention from Rutland to Enfield, Conn. He has 
also credit on the town records for a short service in Rhode 
Island, in 1778. 

He was residuary legatee of his father's estate. In 1782 he 
was married to Margaret McFarland, of Adams. 

Oakham T. R., i, 214. M. S. R., x, 487 (12) [McFarling]. Oakham 
V. R., ziy 86. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1766 [Alexander McFarland]. 



112 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Matthew McGilligan. 

Was living in Oakham at the beginning of the war, and was probably 
in the employ of Deacon James Dean. 

Matthew McGilligan was enlisted by James Dean in Capt. 
Samuel Dexter's company of men raised in Hardwick, New 
Braintree and Oakham for six months' service in the siege of 
Boston, and was in camp at Roxbury in January, 1776. March 
II, 1777, he was again enlisted by James Dean in the Continental 
Army for three years, and was in Capt. Holden's Co., Col. 
Nixon's Regt., which served in the Northern Army and took 
part in the capture of General Burgoyne. April i, 1781, he en- 
listed in the Continental Army for the town of Warren, for a 
term of three years. A descriptive list in 1781 gave his age 22, 
stature 5 feet 11, complexion light, occupation farmer. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., vi, 450 (13), 451 (i) [Gilligan], x, 492 
(8) [McGillagen]. 



James McHerrin. 

Private in Capt. John Crawford's company of minutemen 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. While 
still in service as a minuteman, he reenlisted April 27, 1775, for 
eight months in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., and 
was made Corporal. 

James McHerrin was married to Fanny, fifth daughter of 
William and Mary (Crawford) McCobb. Children, baptized in 
Rutland: Peggy, May 25, 1777; Elizabeth, August 5, 1781 ; 
Mary, April 27, 1783. He removed with his family to Vermont 
before 1790. 

M. S. R., X, 112 (13) [Mackilharin], xi, 183 (5) [Muckleherin], 183 (6) 
[Muckleheron] . Rutland V. R., 62 [McElheron], 63 [McHeron], 164 
[McCkelheron]. Crawford Family of Oakham, 10 [Michaelherring]. 
U. S. Census (1790), Vt., 16 [George McElcharan]. Oakham T. R., i, 
165 [McleHerrin]. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR H3 

Francis Maynard. 

Has credit on the town records for three months' service as 
guard at Rutland in 1779. 

He was a tailor, came from Rutland to Oakham about 1776 
and purchased in the west part of the town, near the old county 
road, a farm on which his descendants still live. He was twice 
elected a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 
and Safety. 

In 1767 he married Ruth Hubbard, who died September 21, 
1782. He was again married February 12, 1784, to Serviah 
Wright of Brookfield. Children, the first six born in Rutland, 
the others in Oakham: Marcy, March 14, 1767; Patty, May 
27, 1768; Amasa, September 16, 1769; Ephraim, September 
5, 1771 ; Ruth, September 18, 1774; Naomi, March 6, 1776; 
Simon, May 5, 1778; Sally, November 7, 1780; Polly, baptized 
September 15, 1782; Francis, August 2, 1788. 

Francis Maynard died January 16, 1799, aged sixty years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215. Oakham V. R., 38. 86, 125. Rutland V. R., 65, 
170 [Meynard]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxvii, 163, Ixxviii, 213. 
Reed, Hist, of Rutland, 144. 

Samuel Metcalf. 

Son of Ebenezer and Margaret Metcalf, born in Rutland in 1739. 

He was Sergeant in Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen 
who marched on April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington 
alarm. September 19, 1776, he enlisted for two months as Cor- 
poral with Lieut. Asa French at Dobbs Ferry, Tarrytown and 
North Castle. He was also Sergeant in the detachment from the 
Oakham company that marched on the Bennington alarm, August 
20, 1777, and in Capt. Crawford's company raised in Hardwick, 
Oakham and New Braintree, that marched September 7, 1777, 
and was engaged in the battles that resulted in the surrender of 
Burgoyne. In 1778 he served again in the regiment that 
guarded Burgoyne's troops on their march from Rutland to 
Enfield, Conn, 
8 



114 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Samuel Metcalf came from Rutland and bought in 1763 of 
Edmond Goodenough, for £70, ninety acres in the northerly 
part of Lot No. 2, with a dwelling-house thereon. This farm 
had been purchased by Mr. Goodenough of John Sollen in 1761, 
and was the farm on which David Fuller was living in 1870, 
when Beers' Worcester County Atlas was made. 

He was one of the signers of the petition of June 23, 1773, 
for the organization of the Congregational Church, and was on 
the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1775. 

He was married in Rutland, March 11, 1762, to Hannah 
Richardson, and had eleven children, all born in Oakham: 
Thomas, August 9, 1764; David, September 15, 1766; Ester, 
September 14, 1768; Samuel, October 18, 1770; John, December 
30, 1772; Joseph, August 24, 1774; Jane, July 30, 1776; Elisa- 
beth, March 14, 1779; Alpha, October 27, 1780; Hannah, June 
15, 1782; Abigail, May 30, 1784. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188, 214. M. S. R., x, 595 (12) [Medcalf], 712 
(2). Oakham V. R., 38. Rutland V. R., 169. Oakham Church Records, 
i, I. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xlviii, 212. Reed, Hist, of Rutland, 163. 
Pay Roll, Capt. How's Co., 1776. 



John Moore. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, August 7, 1777, in Capt. 
Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., for six months' service in Rhode 
Island. 

John Moore lived on the Crocker Nye farm till 1778. His 
wife's name was Hannah. Two children were born in Oakham : 
Nancy, May 7, 1773 ; William, March 2, 1778. 

M. S. R., xi, 100 (4) [Morse]. Oakham V. R., 39 [Moores]. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxvi, 338. 



Ebenezer Nye. 

Born in Barnstable, Mass., February 2, 1739, son of Caleb and Hannah 
(Bodfish) Nye, who were married October 28, 1731. Hannah Bodfish was 
daughter of Benjamin and Lydia (Crocker) Bodfish. She was bom in 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I15 

Barnstable, February 12, 1712, and died March 7, 1779. Caleb Nye was 
bom in Sandwich, Mass., June 28, 1704, the son of Nathan Nye, and 
grandson of Benjamin Nye, of Sandwich. In 1736 Caleb Nye removed 
to Barnstable, and in 1756 to Hardwick, Mass. His will was written in 
Hardwick December 13, 1775, and proved June s, 1787. 

Ebenezer Nye enlisted for the town of Barre, April 20, 1775, 
in Capt. John Black's Co., Col. Jonathan Brewer's Regt., and 
was made Corporal. He was in the battle of Bunker Hill, and 
received compensation for a bayonet and belt lost in the battle. 
He went also for the town of Barre in Capt. Benjamin Nye's 
Co. on the Bennington alarm, August 21, 1777, and again in the 
same company, on September 26, sent to reinforce the Northern 
Army. He served for the town of Oakham in Capt. Jotham 
Houghton's Co., Col. Samuel Denny's Regt., from October 24 
to December i, 1779, at Claverack, and has credit on the Oakham 
town records for fifteen days in April, 1777, on an alarm at 
Williamstown. His name is on the roll of Capt. Newell's Co. 
for fifteen days' service, on the march to Enfield, Conn., Novem- 
ber 3 to November 18, 1778. 

Ebenezer Nye came from Barre, and bought in 1778 of John 
Moore, for £700, two hundred and five acres with buildings 
thereon, still known as the Crocker Nye farm. He was Selectman 
of Oakham for nine years, and was a member of the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1779. 

Deacon Jesse Allen bought at the auction of Timothy Nye's 
property the gun which Ebenezer Nye carried in the Revolution. 
It was with the barrel of this gun used as a retort that Rev. David 
Burt made some of his chemical experiments when he taught 
the Oakham High School. The explosion of an ancient charge 
of powder left in the gun from flintlock days somewhat lessened 
the enthusiasm of the students for that kind of laboratory 
practice. The gun is now in the possession of William A. Nye. 

Ebenezer Nye was married, July 8, 1759, to Meletiah Sturges 
of Hyannis, who was bom in 1740 and died in March, 1826. 
Children : 

Josiah Sturges, a soldier in the Revolutionary Army. 

Temperance, who married Jonathan Richardson of Barre, 
November 12, 1778. 



ll6 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Lucretia, who married Alpheus Stone in 1781. 

Marcy, who married Bowman Chaddock, September 5, 1782. 

Timothy, baptized June 5, 1768, married November 25, 1790, 
to Parnal, daughter of Deacon Jesse Allen. 

Meletiah, baptized July 8, 1770, married November 29, 1792, 
to Rev. Calvin Chaddock, Dartmouth, 1786. 

Crocker, bom July 4, 1772, married May 23, 1799, to Dulcinia, 
daughter of Major Artemas Howe. He was the father of David 
H. Nye and the grandfather of William A. Nye. 

Achsa, called in her father's will the youngest daughter, 
baptized August 28, 1774, married Eli Haskell of Middleboro 
November i, 1797. 

Salmon, born in 1778, who was graduated from Dartmouth 
in 1803, studied law in Barnstable, Mass., was admitted to the 
Common Pleas Court in Barnstable in 1809, and to the Supreme 
Judicial Court in Plymouth in October, 1812. He was County 
Attorney for Barnstable County from 181 1 to 1813. He went 
South in 1818 and died in 1823 in North Carolina. 

John, born in 1780, who was graduated from Dartmouth in 
1801, in the class with Daniel Webster, studied law in Providence 
and practiced in New Bedford, Mass., where he died in 1826. 

Ebenezer Nye died in Oakham in 1793. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189, 252 [his son, Josiah S. Nye]. M. S. R., xi, 584 
(S), (7), 585 (3). Oakham V. R., 40, 89 [Jonathan Richardson = 
Samuell], 126. N. E. Hist. & Gen. Reg., Ivii (1903), 410-414. General 
Catalogue of Dartmouth College (1910-11), 210, 212. Letter of Mrs. 
William A. Nye of Oakham. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Aug. 6, 1793. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxvi, 338. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Paige, 
Hist, of Hardwick, 429, 430. Nye Genealogy, 27, 44, 90, 138 [Pamelia 
Sturges should be Meletiah], 234. Davis, Mass. Bench and Bar, ii, 330 
[Julia (Hinckley) should be Meletiah (Sturges)]. Hyannis Town 
Clerk's Records. 

Josiah Sturges Nye. 

Was sent by his father in 1780 as a militiaman in a three 
months' campaign at West Point, and received iio bounty from 
the town. He enlisted July 5, and was discharged October 10. 

Oakham T. R., i, 252. M. S. R., xi, 595 (2) [Sturgis Nye]. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I17 

Silas N3^e. 

Born in Barnstable in 1744, son of Caleb and Hannah (Bodfish) Nye, 
and brother of Ebenezer Nye. 

Silas Nye enlisted for the town of Barre, April 20, 1775, in 
Capt. John Black's Co., and was in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
He received compensation for a coat lost in that battle. He 
went also, for the town of Barre, on the Bennington alarm, 
August 21, 1777. From September 26 to October 18, 1777, he 
served for the town of Oakham in Capt. Benjamin Nye's Co., 
which marched to reinforce the Northern Army. 

November 27, 1766, he was married in Hardwick to Patience, 
daughter of Nathan and Patience Carpenter. She was born 
April 14, 1744. Children: Sarah, born January 13, 1768; 
Hannah, born November 22, 1769; Nathan, born January 5, 
1772; Caleb, born July 5, 1774; Prudence, born September, 
1776; Silas, born December i, 1780; Amos, born July 31, 1784, 
died April 9, 1789. 

At the close of the war, Silas Nye removed to Salem, Wash- 
ington County, N. Y., and in 1791 to Pittsford, Monroe Co., 
N. Y., where he died. In 1796, 1797, and 1799, he served on the 
Board of Supervisors of Monroe County. 

Oakham T. R., i, 189. M. S R., xi, 594 (i). Paige, Hist, of Hardwick, 
429, 430. Nye Genealogy, 90, 140, 141. 

William O'Brien. 

William O'Brien was a British soldier who had served in the 
9th Regiment under General Burgoyne, and was taken prisoner 
at Saratoga in October, 1777. He had either escaped or been 
paroled from the prison barracks at Rutland and, in the fall 
of 1778, he and George Perkins, a member of the 33d Regiment, 
came to Oakham, where they found employment as nail-makers 
with Thomas Mann. They were accepted as citizens and 
married. When the Council at Boston, on October 12, 1779, 
ordered that all escaped or paroled prisoners should be returned, 
he and Perkins petitioned the Massachusetts Legislature to be 



Il8 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

allowed to remain, and, on December 20, 1779, were given liberty 
to reside in the state during the Court's pleasure. 

January 11, 1781, he enlisted in the Continental Army for the 
town of Paxton, for three years, under Resolve of December 
2, 1780; age 28, stature 5 feet 6, complexion dark, occupation 
nail-maker. He was first in Col. Benjamin Tupper's (loth) 
Regt., and later in Capt. Matthew Chamber's Co., Lieut. Col. 
Calvin Smith's (6th) Regt. 

M. S. R., xi, 614 (11) [Obrian], 616 (11) [Obrine], 617 (4) [Obryon]. 
Acts and Resolves, Prov. of Mass. Bay, v, 840-843. See George Perkins, 
p. 130; George Walls, p. 146. 



William Oliver. 

Joined Capt. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt., for a term of 
three years in the Continental Army. He enlisted for the town 
of Oakham, March 11, 1777, and was in camp near Peekskill, 
February 16, 1779. In May, 1779, he was reported with the 
Paymaster General, and on July i, 1779, was appointed A. D. P. 
General. An order on Capt. Heywood, payable to Phineas Hey- 
wood, dated Shrewsbury, June 7, 1779, was signed by said Oliver, 
for $100 gratuity, which had been granted by the General Court 
in May, 1778. 

William Oliver was a school-teacher, and taught in the north- 
east and southwest plots in Oakham before his enlistment. His 
wife, Sarah Oliver, received aid from the town while her husband 
was in the army. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171, 199, 207. M. S. R., xi, 646 (4). 



Joseph Osborn, Jr. 

Baptized in Hopkinton, March 23, 1755, second child and eldest son of 
Joseph and Jennett (Hodge) Osborn, who were married December 31, 
1751. His father, Joseph Osborn, was son of John and Jenat Osborn, 
and was born in Hopkinton, September o."], 1722. He had eight children, 
all born in Hopkinton. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



119 



Joseph Osborn, the father, came to Oakham in 1770, and October 18, 
purchased of James Craige, Jr., for £88 6s. 8d. one hundred and thirty 
acres in Lot AA. This land was above Clampherd Meadow (now 
Walter Dean's reservoir) and his house was near the residence of Jacob 
Adams. He died March 22, 1800, aged seventy-seven years. 

Joseph Osborn, Jr., was a soldier, perhaps the Joseph Ors- 
born "listed for Quebeck" in Capt. Agrippa Well's Co., Col. 
Asa Whitcomb's Regt., but more likely the man enrolled as John 
Osburn in Capt. Joseph Thompson's Co. of Col. Thomas Nixon's 
Regt. who died at North Castle, September 21, 1776. On April 
18, 1777, the town "Voted that Joseph Osburn's Campagn rate 
of ^3-5-10 be allowed him for his son Joseph's Service in the 
war, who is now deceased." 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. [M. S. R, xi, 682 (6) [Orsborn] (?), 694 (6) 
[John Osburn] (?)]. Oakham V. R., 126. Hopkinton V. R., 144 
[Ozborn], 145 [Ozburn], 336 [Orsborn]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
Ixxxiii, 306, cxxviii, 599, clix, 417. 



Ichabod Packard. 

Born in Bridgewater, August i, 1738, son of George and Mary (Edson) 
Packard. George Packard was son of Nathaniel Packard, and a descend- 
ant on his mother's side of that branch of the Eliot family to which 
belonged John Eliot, "the Apostle of the Indians." 

Ichabod Packard was a soldier in the French War. He was 
with General Winslow in 1755, when that ofificer was sent by 
Governor Shirley to Annapolis (Port Royal), Nova Scotia, to 
remove the Acadians, and served again under General Winslow 
in the following year at Fort William Henry. 

He has credit on the town records for two months' service 
in New York in 1776. August 20, 1777, he marched with Capt, 
Crawford on the Bennington alarm. 

He came to Oakham from Bridgewater in 1770 and purchased 
from Thomas Whipple of New Braintree, for £26 13s. 4d., a 
farm with the buildings thereon, in the northwest corner of Lot 
X, on the county road leading from Rutland to Brookfield (the 
Parley Packard farm). In 1777 he purchased of his brother-in- 



I20 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

law, Jesse Allen, land in Lot No. 22, the farm lately owned by 
James Shearn, and on this place he lived till his death, November 
23, 1813. He was admitted to the Presbyterian Church in 
Oakham on profession of faith, but was one of the signers of the 
petition of June 23, 1773, for the organization of a church in 
Congregational form. 

On May 3, 1757, he was married to Ruth Allen, sister of 
Jesse Allen, who came to Oakham vv^ith him in 1770. Children, 
born in Bridgewater: Nehemiah, October 27, 1760; Ichabod, Jr., 
May 27, 1763; Lydia, March 6, 1766; Isaac, February 9, 1769; 
born in Oakham: Caleb, February 7, 1771 ; James, 1775; 
Martha, 1782. 

Oakham T. R., i. 168, 188. M. S. R.. xii, 347 (4) [Pickard]. Packard 
Family (MS.) by Mr. Charles M. Packard of Westboro. Oakham Church 
Records, i, i. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 255, 
259. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixx, 435, cxcvi, 8. 



Nehemiah Packard. 

Bom in Bridgewater, October 27, 1760, son of Ichabod and Ruth 
(Allen) Packard. 

Nehemiah Packard enlisted May 16, 1775, when fourteen years 
of age, in Capt. Simeon Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., 
for eight months' service at Roxbury. He marched with the 
Oakham company on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777, 
and served in a campaign to Bennington and Half Moon under 
Capt. Edmund Hodges in Col. Job Cushing's Regt., from July 
27 to August 29, 1777. He was also in Capt. Cutler's company, 
which was raised in Western (now Warren) and Oakham, 
and which marched September 24, 1777, with Lieut. Alexander 
Bothwell to join the army under General Gates. 

In 1780 he married Lucy Nye of Barre. Children: Hannah, 
born May 14, 1780; Ruth, born October 26, 1783; Susanna, 
born November 7, 1785; Rebecca, born December 21, 1786; 
Nathan, born June 29, 1789; Sally, born April 27, 1792; Parley, 
born March 30, 1794. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 12 1 

Nehemiah Packard died in Oakham, January 24, 1830, aged 
sixty-nine years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 180. 187, 188, 189. M. S. R., xi. 747 (6) [Packer] 
816 (14) [Parcard], 892 (9) [Parker], xii, 105 (12) [PekardJ. Oakham 
V. R., 40, 41, 90, 126. Packard Family (see above). 



The Parmenter Family. 

Aaron Parmenter came from Sudbury at the time of the first 
settlement of Oakham. 

He was married to Jean, daughter of James and Rachel 
(Wallis) Craige, November 26, 1747. Children: Rebecca, born 
March 16, 1748; Rachel, born November 3, 1751 ; Jacob, 
born January 3, 1754; Hannah, born March 16, 1756; Anna,' 
born March 10, 1758; James, born July 3, 1760; Daniel, born 
August 5, 1762; Aaron, Jr., born January 25, 1765. 

Oakham V. R., 41. Sudbury V. R.. 35 [Creage], 246. 



Daniel Parmenter. 

Born in Sudbury, November 30, 1740, son of William and Mary (Pep- 
per) Parmenter. His mother, Mary Pepper of Framingham, was 
married to William Parmenter September 25, 1740. 

Daniel Parmenter was Sergeant in a company that served 
two months at Roxbury in the early part of 1776, and marched 
as Private on the Bennington alarm, August 20, 1777. Septem- 
ber 7, 1777, he enlisted as Private in Capt. Crawford's company 
which was raised in Hardwick, Oakham and New Braintree 
and sent to reinforce the army of General Gates at Saratoga. 

He came from Sudbury to Oakham, and purchased in 1764 
of James Craige, Jr., for £30, ninety-one and one-half acres in 
Lot No. 25 (the farm occupied one hundred years later by 
Orlando Russell), and thirty-two acres in Lot O. He was 
Selectman in 1781, 1792, and 1793, and was on the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1780. 



122 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

September 20, 1764, he was married to Mary Knight, and 
had seven children, horn in Oakham: Anne, February 18, 1767; 
Samuel, August 29, 1768; Daniel, Jr., February 27, 1771, died 
January 19, 1810; Mary, May 23, 1773; Tamer, August 8, 
1775; WilHam, March 29, 1778; Spencer, May 12, 1785. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188. M. S. R., xi, 812 (9) [Pameter], 938 (5). 
Oakham V. R., 41, 42, 127. Sudbury V. R., 104, 246, 248. Wore. Co. Reg. 
of Deeds, Iviii, 227. 



Isaac Parmenter. 

Born in Oakham, March 30, 1756, son of Solomon and Elizabeth 
(Craige) Parmenter. 

He enHsted in the Continental Army, March 11, 1777, for 
three years in Capt. John Reed's Co., Col. Alden's Regt., and 
received £20 bounty from the town of Oakham. He was 
wounded in the action at Cobleskill, May 31, 1778, when the 
small American force under Captains Brown and Patrick were 
drawn into an ambuscade by a large party of Indians under 
Brant. After five months in hospital at Schenectady, he 
rejoined his regiment. November 11, 1778, he was taken 
prisoner in the Indian raid at Cherry Valley. In his application 
for pension, dated April 20, 1818, he thus describes his service: 

"Marched from Oakham to Peekskill, to Albany, to Fort Ann, and 
met Burgoyne. Marched to Saratoga, then to Albany. Next spring in 
command of Capt. Patrick at Cooniskill, there met the Indians of the 
enemy, was wounded and put in hospital at Skanantoda. After recovery, 
went to Cherry Valley, joined Alden's regiment, and there met Brant 
and Butler of the enemy, and the place was practically destroyed. Said 
Parmenter taken prisoner by Indians and kept eleven months and taken 
to Canada. Then given up to the British and kept by them thirteen 
months. Then exchanged with Col. Butler and a Miss Campbell of 
Cherry Valley." 

He received by will from his father a farm of sixty-three 
acres, being the northeasterly part of Lot No. 8, situated between 
the homestead given to his brother, William Parmenter, and the 
farm of Ebenezer Foster. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



12^ 



October 4, 1781, he was married, in Hardwick, to Lydia 
Fumess. In 1818 he was living at Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y. 
He died April 26, 1826. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., xi, 943 (4) [Parmeter], 947 (4) 
[Parmiter]. Oakham V. R., 91. Pension Application, Apr. 20, 1818 
[March 30, 1756 = March 27]. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Apr. 6, 1790 
[Solomon Parmenter]. 



Isaiah Parmenter. 

Born in Sudbury, July 16, 1742, son of William and Mary (Pepper) 
Parmenter. 

He was First Lieutenant in Capt. Crawford's company of 
minutemen who marched April 19, 1775, in response to the 
Lexington alarm ; and Sergeant in Capt. Samuel Dexter's com- 
pany, which was raised in Hardwick, New Braintree and Oak- 
ham for six months' service in the siege of Boston. This 
company formed part of Col. Ebenezer Learned's regiment, and 
went into camp at Roxbury, May 19, 1775. He served also, 
with rank of Ensign, in New York, in the latter part of 1776, 
and again as Lieutenant in Capt. Ralph Earll's Co., Col. Dan- 
forth Keyes's Regt., from June 2.y, 1777, till July 27, 1777, at 
Providence. 

Isaiah Parmenter was Selectman of Oakham in 1778 and 1779, 
and was a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspec- 
tion and Safety in 1777. He was one of the signers of the 
petition of June 23, 1773, for the organization of a Congregational 
Church in Oakham. 

January 28, 1762, he was married in Sudbury to Lydia, daugh- 
ter of Uriah and Hannah Hayden. Children: Thaddeus, born 
July ^ij, 1762; Winser, born March 2j, 1766. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188. M. S. R., xi, 938 (7), 949 (8) [Pamenter]. 
Oakham V. R., 42. Sudbury V. R., 64, 106, 246. Oakham Church 
Records, i, i. 



124 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Jacob Parmenter. 

Son of Aaron and Jean (Craige) Parmenter, was born in Oakham, 
January 3, 1754- 

He was one of the minutemen in Capt. Crawford's company 
that marched April 19, 1775, in response to the Lexington alarm. 
While still in service as a minuteman, he enlisted, April 27, in 
Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., for a term of eight 
months at Roxbury. September 13, 1777, he enlisted as a 
Private in the Continental Army, residence Oakham. He 
appears to have been in Col. William R. Lee's regiment, when 
in 1780, at Morristown, this and three other Massachusetts 
regiments were incorporated into one regiment, under command 
of Col. Henry Jackson, agreeable to the arrangement of April 
9, 1779. Said Jacob Parmenter appeared among men belong- 
ing to Col. Lee's regiment who had been discharged from the 
rolls prior to this agreement. He had been reported deserted 
September 6, 1778, his family living in Oakham. By the report 
of a committee for settling disputes between towns as to 
soldiers credited to them (year not given), said Parmenter of 
Oakham was allowed to Northfield. He has also credit on the 
Oakham town records for service at Ticonderoga in- 1776 and 
1777. 

He was married to Ruth Bellows August 12, 1776. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 171. M. S. R., xi, 938 (8), 943 (S) [Parmeter], 
945 (12) [Parmetur], xii, 178 (2) [Permenter], 178 (9) [Permertor]. 
Oakham V. R., 41. Rutland V. R., 177. 



James Parmenter. 

Born in Oakham, July 3, 1760, son of Aaron and Jean (Craige) 
Parmenter. 

He enlisted in the Continental Army March 11, 1777, for a term 
of three years, in Capt. Reed's Co., Col. Alden's, afterwards Col. 
Brooks's Regt., and received £20 bounty from the town of Oak- 
ham. He was in the battles of Saratoga that resulted in the 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR I 25 

defeat of General Burg-oyne. In the massacre at Cherry \''alley, 
November ii, 1778, he v/as taken prisoner by the Indians, and 
is supposed to have died in captivity. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., xi, 943 (7) [Parmenter], 947 (6) 
[Parmiter]. Oakham V. R., 41. 



Rufus Parmenter. 

Born in Sudbury, July 4, 1752, eldest son of Samuel and Mary (Tower) 
Parmenter, who were married November 14, 1751. 

He marched with Capt. Crawford's company on the Rhode 
Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 

Rufus Parmenter lived in a small house at Lincolnville which 
was occupied by Stephen Lincoln, Jr., from 1834 to 1857. The 
jury-box still used by the town of Oakham was made by him. 

In 1778 he was married to Hannah Mann of Paxton. Chil- 
dren, born in Oakham; Elijah, December 26, 1779, died of 
spotted fever, March 21, 1810; Edmund, March 26, 1782; 
Elisabeth Mann, October 21, 1784, died November 20, 1822; 
Luke, April 29, 1787, died September 17, 1787; Lucy, August 
II, 1788; Ezra, April 30, 1792, died September 5, 1794. 

Mr. Parmenter died in Oakham, February 16, 1814, aged 
sixty-one years. 

Oakham T. R, i. 187. M. S. R., xi, 940 (8). Oakham V. R, 41, 91, 
127. Sudbury V. R., 108, 248. Recollections of Mr. Stephen Lincoln. 



Solomon Parmenter. 

Born in Sudbury, September 14, 1721, son of Solomon and Deborah 
Parmenter. 

He has credit on the town records for four months' service 
at Boston in 1776. As he was then fifty-five years old, he 
evidently sent for this campaign his son William, whose name 
appears on the pay roll of the company of Capt. Ezekiel Knowl- 
ton of Templeton, dated Dorchester, November 20, 1776. This 



126 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

was one of the eight companies raised "for the defence of 
Boston,'' in accordance with the Resolve of April 9, 1776. 

Solomon Parmenter came from Sudbury at the time of the 
first settlement of Oakham and bought of James Craige in 
1758 two hundred and fifty acres of land and two-fifths of 
the Craige saw-mill. He was Assessor in 1760, and a member 
of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 
1780. 

May 10, 1748, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of 
James and Rachel (Wallis) Craige. Children, born in Oakham: 
William, in 1752; Betty, in 1754; Lois, who married Timothy 
Underwood; Isaac, March 30, 1756; Lucy, who married Elijah 
Holt of Fitchburgh, April 17, 1781 ; Betty, October 24, 1761 ; 
Grace, August 17, 1763, married Richard Dean in 1788; Moley, 
March 24, 1769, married Amasa Maynard in 1793. 

Betty Parmenter died March 29, 1761, aged seven years. Her 
grave is the only one in the old cemetery, on the hill south of 
Coldbrook, that is marked by a tombstone. This was the first 
lot set apart for a burial ground in Oakham. 

Solomon Parmenter died in Oakham, December 19, 1789, 
aged sixty-nine years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. Oakham V. R., 41, 80, 127. Gravestone Record 
of Betty Parmenter in Coldbrook Hill Cemetery. Sudbury V. R., 35 
[Creag], 109, 248. Pension Application of Isaac Parmenter (see above). 
Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Apr. 6, 1790. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixiii, 
418. 

William Parmenter. 

Born in Oakham in 1752, the eldest son of Solomon and Elizabeth 
(Craige) Parmenter. 

He was sent by his father to serve for four months in 1776 
as a Private in Capt. Ezekiel Knowlton's Co., Col. Dike's Regt., 
and was stationed at Dorchester Heights. Pay abstract for 
travel home (67 miles) was dated Dorchester, November 20, 
1776. He also marched with Capt. Crawford on the Bennington 
alarm, August 20, 1777. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 27 

William Parmenter received by will from his father the 
homestead farm, including the whole of Lot No. 9, with all 
his tools, cattle, horses, and sheep ; also one-half of the saw-mill 
standing near the said homestead. 

In 1776 he was married to Jenney Boyd, probably a daughter 
of Samuel Boyd. A daughter, Mahittable, was born March 3, 
1778. His wife Jenney died in Oakham, June 13, 1783, aged 
twenty-eight years, and he was again married to Kathrin Dean 
in 1783. 

Mr. Parmenter died in Oakham, February 10, 1827, aged 
seventy-five years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188. M. S. R., xi, 812 (11) [Pameter], 940 (12). 
Oakham V. R., 41, 92, 127. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Apr. 6, 1790 
[Solomon Parmenter]. 



Asa Partridge. 

Born May 23, 1736, in Medfield, son of Edward and Sarah (Jones) 
Partridge. Edward Partridge was grandson of William Partridge who 
settled in Medfield, where he died in 1692. 

He was Sergeant in Capt Ezekiel Knowlton's Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt., which was at Dorchester Heights. Pay abstract 
for travel home, sixty-seven miles, was dated November 20, 
1776. He served also from October 19, 1779, to November 23, 
1779, at Claverack, as Private in Capt. Joseph Richardson's Co., 
Col. Samuel Denny's Regt. He has also credit on the town 
records for a campaign to Boston, beginning April i, 1778. 

He came to Oakham from New Braintree and bought at 
Public Vendue, June 23, 1767, for £78 19s. 7d., one hundred 
and seventy acres of land in Oakham, being the northerly part 
of Lot No. 26, belonging to Robert Wilson and sold for unpaid 
taxes. 

Asa Partridge was Selectman of Oakham in 1778, and mem- 
ber of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety 
in 1775. He was one of the signers of the petition of June 23, 
1773, for the organization of a church in Congregational form, 



128 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

and was chosen "Qtiorister" at a church meeting-, October 26, 

1775- 
December 25, 1758, he married Rachel Banister of Brookfield. 

Children, the first four born in Brookfield and the last four in 

Oakham: Pamela, December 17, 1759; Katherin, January 16, 

1762; Calista, October 7, 1763; Rachel, August 2, 1765; Mary, 

August 2, 1767, in New Braintree; Lurana, August 23, 1769; 

Asa, October 15, 1771 ; Frederick, December 5, 1773; Sarah, 

March 6, 1779. His wife was admitted to the Congregational 

Church in Oakham August 8, 1773, on letter from the Third 

Church in Brookfield. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 189, 242. M. S. R., xi, 985 (2), (3). N. E. Hist. 
& Gen. Reg., Ixiii (1909), 90, 93. Oakham V. R., 42. Oakham Church 
Records, i, i. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. Brookfield V. R., 171, 382. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ivii, 257. 



Edward Partridge, 2d. 

Born in Medfield, May 22,, 1738, son of Edward and Sarah (Jones) 
Partridge, and brother of Asa and Silas Partridge. 

He has credit on the town records for five months' service 
in New York, ending December i, 1776, and marched July 
23, 1777, with Capt. Crawford on the Rhode Island alarm. 

Edward Partridge purchased of Jesse Allen, in 1772, the farm 
on which Charles H. Trowbridge now lives. He was one of the 
petitioners, June 23, 1773, ^o'" the organization of a church 
in Congregational form, and was a member of the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety in 1780. 

In 1770, he was married in Franklin to Hannah Legg, who was 
born March 11, 1749, and died in Oakham, April 25, 1832. Chil- 
dren, the first born in Franklin, the others in Oakham: Chloe, 
November i, 1771 ; Bernard, November i, 1773; Hannah, 
November 21, 1775; Elias, August 11, 1778; Adin, October 19, 
1780; Olive, July 29, 1783; Edward, 3d, December 17, 1785; 
Reuben, January 31, 1788; John, March 10, 1790; Sarah, May 
12, 1794. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 29 

Edward Partridge, 2d, died October 19, 181 5, aged seventy- 
eight years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187. M. S. R., xi, 986 (6). N. E. Hist. & Gen. 
Reg., Ixiii (1909), 93, 94, 95. Oakham V. R., 42, 127. Oakham Church 

Records, i, i. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxviii, 58. 



Silas Partridge. 

Born September 2, 1744, in Medfield, son of Edward and Sarah (Jones) 
Partridge. 

He has credit on the town records for five months' service 
in New York, ending December i, 1776, and for a campaign to 
Boston, beginning April i, 1778. 

Silas Partridge lived on the Partridge place in Lot X. He 
was married, April 22, 1773, to Sarah Pray, who was born in 
1745. He died in Oakham, September 25, 1819, aged seventy- 
five years. His widow, Sarah, died in Oakham November 30, 
1822, at the age of seventy-seven years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 189. N. E. Hist. & Gen. Reg., Ixiii (1909), 93- 
Oakham V. R., 127. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xcix, 196. 



Benjamin Perkins. 

Bom in Bridgewater, July 9, 1735, son of Solomon and Lydia (Sprague) 
Perkins, and great grandson of David Perkins who came from Beverly 
to Bridgewater before 1688. His brother, Solomon Perkins, served in 
175s in the French war, under General Winslow. 

He has credit on the town records for six weeks' service in 
Rhode Island, beginning July i, 1779. 

In 1779 he purchased from Ichabod Packard, for £40, thirty- 
seven acres in the south part of Lot X, which Mr. Packard had 
purchased of Robert Harper. This was probably on the road 
that leads from Lover's Lane, near the old Bothwell mill. 

July 28, 1 76 1, he married Hepzibah Washburn of Middleboro. 
Benjamin Perkins, who was residing in Oakham in 1790, and 
Leavitt Perkins, were probably his sons. 



130 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



His estate was settled in 1781. James Dean, Joseph Chad- 
dock and WiUiani Bothwell took inventory. Hepzibah, his 
widow, was administratrix. His small farm of thirty-seven 
acres was valued at £97 los. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxii, 488. Wore. 
Co. Prob. Records, 1781. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 265, 266. May- 
flower Descendant, xiv, 184. Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, ii, 127. 
U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. 



George Perkins. 

George Perkins was a British soldier who had served in the 
33d Regiment under General Burgoyne, and was taken prisoner 
at Saratoga in October, 1777. He had either escaped or obtained 
a pass to go at large from the prison barracks in Rutland, 
together with William O'Brien, a member of the 9th Regiment, 
and, in the fall of 1778, the two men came to Oakham, where 
they found employment as nail-makers with Thomas Mann. 
They were received as citizens and married. George Walls, 
probably a Hessian, who had also escaped or been paroled from 
Rutland, joined them later. The people of Oakham were glad 
to get skilled workmen and encouraged them, and others like 
them, to remain in town. At a meeting of the citizens on July 
13, 1779, the following resolution was passed: 

"Voted as the mind of the people at this adjournment that the assessors 
should strike out the last of the rates now in Mr. Green's and Mr. 
Brown's hand, the rates for the polls of George Walls and George Perkins, 
two [British] regulars." 

On October 12, 1779, the Council at Boston, on the ground 
that the privileges allowed the prisoners were "big with mis- 
chief," gave a general order that all escaped or paroled prisoners 
should be returned to the Commissary of Prisoners. Perkins 
and O'Brien petitioned: 

"That the said O'Brien & Perkins Deserted from sd Convention Troops 
about fourteen months since with a full design to become inhabitants of 
this Country & not to return to the British Troops any more, and have 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 131 

ever since laboured with the good People of this State in a peacable 
manner in the usefull Business of nail making, having each of us been 
Rated & paid Taxes the year past — And that your humble Petitioners are 
very Desirous of being true and loyal Subjects of this State, of taking the 
Oath of Allegiance & fidelity, & of paying & doing our part for the 
support of the war & all other Taxes — Therefore pray Your Hon^ to 
grant us the favours as above, and such protection as you Shall see meet, 
and that we may not be taken up or sent to the British troops to be 
punished for Appearing in the Cause of American Liberty, and as in Duty 
bound ask leave to pray." 

The Selectmen and Assessors of Oakham, and Thomas Mann, 
certified to the sincerity and industry of Perkins and O'Brien, 
and on December 20, 1779, the House of Representatives 
resolved : 

"That the said George Perkins & William O'Brien, who have produced 
Certificates from the Select men of the Town where they reside, that 
they appear attach*^ to the Government of this state and bid fair to be 
usefull members of society, have liberty to reside in this State during the 
Courts pleasure." 

George Walls was probably included in the general order of 
December 21, 1779, welcoming to American citizenship, without 
formal action by the Legislature in individual cases, any person 
or persons who made a part of the German Troops of Burgoyne. 

All three men later enlisted, in 1781, for a term of three years 
in the Continental Army under Resolve of December 2, 1780, 
Perkins and Walls from Oakham, and O'Brien from Paxton. 
Perkins enlisted January 20; age 22, stature 5 feet 11, com- 
plexion light, occupation blacksmith. He received from the 
town of Oakham a bounty of three hundred silver dollars, was 
assigned to Capt. Elnathan Haskell's Co., Col. William Shepard's 
Regt., was at York Hutts in December, 1781, and at Verplanck's 
Point in January, 1782. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215, 239, 262. M. S. R., xi, 918 (7) [Parkins], xii, 
143 (4) [Perkens], 153 (12), 800 (2) [Prkins]. Acts and Resolves, Prov. 
of Mass. Bay, v, 840-843. See William O'Brien, p. 117; George Walls, 
p. 146. 



1-2 • SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Leavitt Perkins. 

Enlisted in the Continental Army in 1780 for six months, 
and according to the Resolve of December 2, 1780, reenlisted 
for the town of Oakham April 3, 1781, for three years; age 17, 
stature 5 feet 5, complexion light, occupation farmer. 

Oakham T. R., i, 251, 263. M. S. R, xi, 919 (3) [Parkins], xii, 163 (7), 
441 (10) [Pirkones], 850 (9) [Lovat Purkins]. 



\ 



Zephaniah Perkins. 

Born in Bridgewater in 1742, son of David and Alice (Leach) Perkins, 
and grandson of David Perkins who came from Beverly and settled in 
Bridgewater before 1688, and who was the first Representative of Bridge- 
water in the General Court in Boston after the union of the two colonies 
in 1692. John Perkins, whose name appears on the Oakham Town 
Records, April 10, 1780, was probably his brother. 

He enlisted May 16, 1775, for service of eight months at Rox- 
bury, in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt. He evidently 
reenlisted in the early part of 1776, as he was in camp at 
Dorchester February 15, 1776. March 11, 1777, he engaged 
for three years in the Continental Army, in Capt. Reed's Co., 
Col. Alden's Regt. He was killed September 15, 1777. 

February 25, 1766, he married Mary Ford of Pembroke, prob- 
ably the daughter of John and Mary (Cushing) Ford, who was 
baptized April 18, 1742. In December, 1777, his widow, Mary 
Perkins, was appointed administratrix of his estate, which con- 
sisted of a few acres of land and small buildings lying in 
Oakham, valued at £23. April 8, 1778, she was the wife of 
Capt. John Crawford, but the exact date of marriage is not 
recorded. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 178, 239. M. S. R., xi, 919 (8) [Parkins], xii, I44 
(5) [Perkens], 174 (6). Pembroke V. R., 89, 275 [Foord]. Wore. Co. 
Prob. Records, Dec., 1777, Apr. 8, 1778. Spy, Jan. i, 1778. Recollections 
of Mrs. Hannah Woolley. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 265. May- 
flower Descendant, ii, 146, xiv, 47. Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, ii, 129 
[Mary Foard of Easton]. See John Crawford, p. 71. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 33 

Elisha Pike. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham April 9, 1777, for three 
years in the Continental Army, and was in Capt. Daniel Shay's 
Co., Col. Rufus Putnam's Regt. He was in the service till 
April 2, 1780. His residence is given as Oakham and Hard wick, 
and it is uncertain to which town he was credited. 

M. S. R., xii, 397 (i). 



Asa Pope. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, August 18, 1781, in Capt. 
Joseph Elliot's Co., Col. William Turner's Regt., and served 
three months and fourteen days at Rhode Island. 

M. S. R., xii, 564 (9). 



Ebenezer Rice. 

Marched with the Oakham company on the Rhode Island 
alarm, July 23, 1777, and on the Bennington alarm, August 
20, 1777. 

M. S. R., xiii, 150 (9). 



George Rich. 

Enlisted September i, 1777, with his father, Jonas Rich, as 
Private in Capt. Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., for service 
in Rhode Island, from which he was discharged January 4, 1778. 

He and his brother Jonas, by the will of their grandfather, 
John Rich, of Brookfield, were to inherit, after the death of 
their father and mother, thirty acres of the farm on which their 
father was living in 1767. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., xiii, 192 (3). Wore. Co. Reg. of 
Deeds, Iviii, 15. 



134 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Jonas Rich. 

Marched with Capt Crawford July 23, 1777, on the Rhode 
Island alarm, and enlisted September i, 1777, in Capt. Earll's Co., 
Col. Keyes's Regt., for service in Rhode Island, from which he 
was discharged January 4, 1778. Under the Resolve of Jan- 
uary 5, 1780, he enlisted for six months in the Continental 
Army, and marched to camp July 12, 1780. Agreeable to the 
Resolve of December 2, 1780, he reenlisted January i, 1781, 
in the Continental Army for three years in an artillery regiment ; 
age 56, stature 5 feet 10, complexion light, occupation farmer; 
reported rheumatic and unfit for duty. 

Jonas Rich came from Brookfield and lived on a farm of 
sixty acres, west of James Bell. The easterly half of this farm 
he purchased from his brother, John Rich, September 9, 1767, 
for i30. This he sold September 23, 1767, to William Smith 
of Barre for f 10. This was probably the place where Samuel 
Tucker was living in 1850. 

He was married in 1760 to Elizabeth Trask, and had two sons, 
Jonas and George. 

Jonas Rich (probably the son) was living in Oakham in 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 251, 262. M. S. R., xiii, 193 (6), 354 (9) 
[Ritch]. Brookfield V. R., 397. U. S. Census (1790), Mass., 230. Wore. 
Co. Reg. of Deeds, Iviii, 15, 16. 



John Robinson, 2d. 

John Robinson, grandson of William Robinson of Watertown, was 
born in Newton in 1722. He was married to Lydia Warren of Waltham, 
September 20, 1753, in Sudbury, and died in Newton in 1770. Their son, 
John, 2d, born in Newton, April 23, 1760, came to Oakham in 1790 and 
bought the place on which he and his descendants have lived for one 
hundred and twenty-five years. 

Lydia Warren was baptized in Watertown, November 24, 1728, and 
died in Oakham, September 10, 1798, aged seventy-one years. She was 
daughter of Joshua and Elizabeth (Harris) Warren, and a descendant, 
through Caleb Church, of Richard Warren who came to America in the 
Mayflower, and landed at Plymouth, December 20, 1620. His name is 
twelfth on the list of signatures to the Compact signed in the cabin of 
the Mayflower. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 35 

He enlisted in the Continental Army for six months, agree- 
able to the Resolve of January 5, 1780; age 21, stature 5 feet 
II, complexion light. Engaged for the town of Northboro. 
Marched from Northboro July 2, 1780, discharged December 
6, 1780, service five months and fifteen days, two hundred miles 
travel. 

October 6, 1778, in Northboro, he was married to Susannah, 
daughter of Thaddeus and Thankful Fay. Children, first five 
born in Northboro: William, December 7, 1779; Peter, Novem- 
ber 18, 1781, married Mary Bullard in 181 1; Catherine, May 
19, 1784; Thaddeus, October 8, 1786; Sally, May i, 1789, 
married Isaac Stone, 3d, February 27, 1815; Polly, November 

8, 1791 ; Betsy, October 7, 1795, married Zadoc Preshoe May 
5, 1817; Susannah, August 29, 1797, married Otis Stone June 

9, 1818; John, 3d, generally known as Colonel John Robinson, 
February 18, 1800, married Susan Stone December 2, 1824; 
Lurana, October 29, 1802, married James C. Fairbank June 9, 
1825; Abraham Fay, October 3, 1805; Jeremiah, October 5, 
1808, married Julia M. Boyden of Brookfield in 1832. 

John Robinson, 2d, died in Oakham September 8, 1818. 

M. S. R., xiii, 453 (8). John Robinson's Account Book, in possession 
of Miss Susan F. Fairbank of Oakham. Oakham V. R., 44, 45, 96, 97, 
129. Newton V. R., 167. Sudbury V. R., 262. Letter of Mrs. Walter 
North of Buffalo, N. Y. Northboro Town Clerk's Records. 



Thomas Ruggles. 

Son of Benjamin and Alice (Merrick) Ruggles of Hardwick, was 
baptized June 24, 1750. 

He served for the town of Hardwick as a minuteman in 
Capt. Simeon Hazeltine's Co., on the Lexington alarm in 1775, 
and reenlisted later in Capt. Samuel Dexter's Co., Col. Leamed's 
Regt., at Roxbury. On the Bennington alarm in August, 1777, 
he was Corporal in Capt. Timothy Paige's Co., Col. James 
Converse's Regt. 

July 19, 1778, he married Hannah, daughter of Thomas 
Winslow. Thomas Ruggles was a shoemaker by trade and 



136 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

removed to Oakham not later than May 17, 1798. Children, 
the first three born at Hardwick, and the last four at Oakham: 
Miriam, October 23, 1778, married Ebenezer Foster, Jr., of 
Oakham, June 8, 1806; Willard, September 4, 1780, married 
Susannah Packard of Oakham in 1806, died at Oakham July 3, 
1809; Charlotte, October 3, 1782, died at Oakham March 28, 
1824; Arathusa, married Richard Howe of Poultney, Vt. ; 
Rhoda, 1787, died June 21, 1809, at Oakham; Philena, August, 
1790, married Benjamin Rice, Jr., of Barre, December 15, 1814, 
died September 16, 1837; Joshua, December i, 1792, married 
Olive Holton, died September 3, 1852; Reuel, March 27, 1796, 
died December 13, 1873; Hannah, May 17, 1798, married Samuel 
Warner Smith of Barre in 1822, died January 6, 1857 ; Thomas, 
Jr., December 14, 1800; Harriet, January 24, 1803, married 
Richard Howe, died in October, 1861 ; Seraph Howe, born 
February 23, 1806, married Norman B, Thompson, August 16, 
1827. 

Thomas Ruggles and his wife Hannah both died in Oakham, 
the former on May 12 [or 21], 1808, the latter on March 3, 1832. 

M. S. R., xiii, 655 (3). Oakham V. R., 45 [Ruggals], 97 [Rugals], 129 
[Ruggals, Rugles]. Paige, Hist, of Hardwick, 483, 485-486 [Jan. 
24=:June 25. March 3=28]. 

David Shaw. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham in Capt. Joseph Richard- 
son's Co., Col. Samuel Denny's Regt., raised for service at 
Claverack-on-the-Hudson in 1779. 

Oakham T. R., i, 242. M. S. R., xiv, 42 (5). 

James Shaw. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham July 5, 1780, in Capt. Tim- 
othy Paige's Co., Col. John Rand's Regt., for three months' 
service at West Point; discharged October 10, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 252. M. S. R., xiv, 51 (3). 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 37 

James Shaw, Jr. 

Engaged for nine months in the Continental Army for the 
town of Oakham, and was mustered in, July 7, 1779; age 19, 
stature 5 feet 6, complexion dark. July 10 he joined Capt. 
Wadsworth's Co., Col. Bradford's Regt. He was discharged 
April 9, 1780, and reenlisted July 5, 1780, in Capt. Timothy 
Paige's Co., Col. John Rand's Regt., for three months' service 
at West Point. 

Oakham T. R., i, 242, 252. M. S. R., xiv, 50 (11), 51 (4). 



Timothy Shaw. 

Private in Capt. Ezekiel Knowlton's Co., Col. Dike's Regt., 
for service at Dorchester, ending December i, 1776. May 5, 
1777, he enlisted for a term of two months at Rhode Island, in 
Capt. Hodges's Co., Col. Whitney's Regt. He was also detailed 
by Capt. Crawford, in place of Thomas White, for service in 
Col. Gerrish's regiment of guards which escorted the troops of 
the Saratoga Convention from Rutland to Enfield, Conn., in 1778. 

This is probably the Timothy Shaw who was born in New 
Braintree September i, 1758, son of Andrew and Anna Shaw, 
and married Silva Howard September 30, 1784. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165, 187, 214. M. S. R., xiv, 71 (9). New Braintree 
V. R., 44, 112. 

Wilham Smith. 

Served four months for the town of Barre in Capt. Ezekiel 
Knowlton's Co., at Boston in 1776. He has credit on the Oakham 
town records for three months' service in New York in 1776; 
and in 1779, for nine months at West Point, in the Continental 
Army. 

William Smith came from Barre. September 23, 1767, he 
bought for iio one-half of the farm in Oakham on which Jonas- 



J 38 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Rich was then Hving. In 1780 he was a member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety. 

He married Rebecca Parmenter in 1766, being then a resi- 
dent of Barre. Qiildren, all born in Oakham: Anna, May 28, 
1767; Elisabeth, September 3, 1769; Aaron, February 2, 1772; 
Joab, September 9, 1774; John, August 14, 1776; James, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1780; Farrington, October 27, 1782; Ephraim, 
December 16, 1784; Rebecka, September 7, 1787. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 242. M. S. R., xiv, 578 (6). Oakham V. R., 
46, 99. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Iviii, 16. 

Asa Snell. 

Enlisted June 5, 1775, from Oakham, in Capt. Hazeltine's 
Co., Col. Fellows' Regt., and was entitled to a bounty coat at 
Dorchester, November 27, 1775. From April, 1777, to June, 
1783, he served in the Continental Army. On January 10, 1781, 
a descriptive list was taken : age 25, stature 5 feet 6, complexion 
light, hair light. His residence when a Continental soldier was 
given as Barre, Hubbardston, and Rutland. In his application 
for a pension he wrote : "Served in Army during whole of war. 
Was in the battles of Breeds Hill, Monmouth, Jamestown, 
Brandywine, and at the capture of Cornwallis." 

June 24, 1774, he and David Wheaton purchased together fifty 
acres of land in Barre, lying in Great Farm No. 6, near the 
Princeton line. In 1818 he was living in Sutton, Mass., and was 
sixty-three years of age. 

M. S. R., xiv, 588 (7), 589 (2), 598 (5) [Snill]. Pension Application, 
Apr. 14, 1818. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, Ixxvii, 152. 



Benjamin Spooner. 

Was born in Dartmouth, Mass., in 1737, and removed to Oakham 
later than his brother Eleazer. 

He marched with the detachment from the Oakham company 
on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 39 

His wife's name was Mehitabel. He died in Oakham in 1820. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187. M. S. R., xiv, 734 (14). Rev. D. Tomlinson's 
Notes. Letter of Mrs. Julius W. Brown of Springfield. 



Eleazer Spooner. 

Baptized November 15, 1734, in Dartmouth, Mass., a descendant in the 
fifth generation of William Spooner, who was in Plymouth in 1637. 

He has credit on the town records for the Bennington cam- 
paign in August, 1777, and for six weeks' service in Rhode 
Island in 1778. 

Eleazer Spooner came to Oakham in 1776, and purchased 
of Jesse Allen, for i383 6s. 8d., a tract of land with the buildings 
thereon, containing about one hundred and fifty-five acres, on 
which he lived till his death. 

He married Mehitabel Allen, born October 22, 1740, daughter 
of Andrew and Abiah Allen. They had nine children, the last 
four born in Oakham, the others in Dartmouth : Moses, Novem- 
ber 30, 1765; Prince, December 15, 1768; Eleanor, 1770; 
Benjamin, September 16, 1772; Polly, September 27, 1774; 
Ruby, 1777; Lois, 1779; Andrew, May 18, 1781 ; Mehitabel, 

1783. 

His brother Benjamin was in the Revolution, and three grand- 
sons, Andrew, Albert and Edwin C, sons of Deacon Andrew 
Spooner, were in the Civil War. 

Moses Spooner was married to Susanna Conant October 24, 
^790. Among his children born in Oakham were: Lucius, 
April 4, 1791 ; EHjah Blackman, June 27, 1792; Eleazer, 2d, 
June 28, 1794, father of Pardon, Joseph and Luther; Albert, 
August 20, 1796, a student at Dartmouth College, and a lawyer 
in New York City; Moses, February 8, 1804; Caleb, February 
23, 1806. 

Eleazer Spooner died in Oakham in March, 1813. His widow 
died October 2, 1821. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188, 214. Oakham V. R., 46, 47. Rev. D. Tomlinson's 
Notes. Spy, Oct. 17, 1821. Letter of Mrs. Brown (see above). 



I40 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Richard Sternes. 

Was credited to the town of Oakham for service in the 
artillery in the Continental Army, in Capt. Buckland's Co., Col, 
Crane's Regt., during the years 1777-1779- 

M. S. R., xiv, 931 (2). 



William Stevenson. 

Private in Capt. Crawford's company of minutemen which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, and in the 
Oakham detachment on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777. 
He served also in a campaign to Boston, beginning April i, 1778, 
and was stationed at Winter Hill. 

In 1 79 1 he owned a house on East Hill, south of the Goodale 
farm, probably the Drury place. In 1768 he was married to 
Mary, daughter of George and Katherine Harper. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 189. M. S. R., xiv, 923 (8) [Stephens], 927 (13) 
[Stephenson], 990 (5). Oakham V. R., 100. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
cxiii, 500. 



The Stone Family. 

Isaac Stone was born in Lexington, IMass., in 1731. In 1751 
he removed from Lexington to Rutland, where he built the 
west part of the tavern and kept an inn for several years. 
In 1765 he removed from Rutland to Oakham, and on Septem- 
ber 16 of that year purchased from Thomas Hubbard of Boston 
for £75 one hundred and seventy-five acres, one-half of Lot No. 
12, now known as the Austin Adams farm. This deed, recorded 
October 21, 1765, was the first deed recorded of property said 
to be in Oakham instead of in Rutland West Wing. To this he 
added, on IVIarch 25, 1766, 128 acres in Lot No. 22, by purchase 
from John Murray. 

Isaac Stone was one of the most prominent citizens of 
Oakham during the next thirty years. His name first appears 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 141 

on the town records March 4, 1766, when he was chosen Mod- 
erator, Town Clerk, Selectman, and Assessor. He served the 
town nine times as Moderator, thirteen times as Assessor, seven 
times as Town Clerk, and six times as Selectman. He was chosen 
unanimously to represent the town in the Provincial Congress 
at Cambridge in 1775, and was a prominent member of that 
body. Mr. Stone was a member of the Committee of Correspond- 
ence, Inspection and Safety in 1775, 1776 and 1777, and has 
credit on the town records for the Bennington alarm. 

September 8, 1748 he was married to Martha Munroe of 
Weston, and had nine children: Abner, born in Lexington, 
December 11, 1748, O. S.; Pattee, born in Rutland, March 12, 
175 1, O. S., married Rev. John Strickland, the first minister 
of the church in Oakham, October 29, 1767; Isaac, 2d, born in 
Rutland, June 2, 1753, O. S. ; Abigail, born in Rutland, May 
20, 1755, married Heman Bassett in 1776," Alpheus, born in 
Rutland June 6, 1757; Luke, born in Rutland April 11, 1763, 
died June 25, 1763 ; Frederick Munroe, born in Rutland Feb- 
ruary 6, 1765, married Pattie, daughter of Jonathan Bullard 
in 1784; Electa, born in Oakham December 16, 1766; Lucretia, 
bom in Oakham November 22, 1772, married Henry Kelley 
May 23, 1793. 

Mr. Stone died in Oakham December 3, 1794, aged sixty-three 
years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. Oakham V. R., 47, 48, 82, 100, 130, 131. Rev. 
D. Tomlinson's Notes. Lexington V. R., 152. Reed, Hist, of Rutland, 148. 
Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, liii, 178, Ixxxiii, 295. Records, Wore. Co. Court 
of Sessions, 1758 on. 



Alpheus Stone. 

Born in Rutland, June 6, 1757, the son of Isaac and Martha (Munroe) 
Stone and brother of Isaac Stone, 2d. 

He armed himself at his own expense and enlisted March 
II. 1777, in the Continental Army for three years, in Col. 
Nixon's 6th Mass. Regt., which served in the Northern Depart- 



142 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

ment. He was in Capt. Toogood's company, and later in the 
company of Capt. Heywood. Like his brother, he was not 
absent, except on furlough, between August 15, 1777, and 
February 16, 1779. In his appHcation for pension dated April 
22, 1818, he wrote: 

"Served most of his time in the State of New York, was in skirmish 
at Danbury when our stores were burned by enemy, was in escort of 
Gen. Lincoln from Ticonderoga in 1777, in skirmish at Kingsbury with 
Indians at same time, was in whole siege, features and hardships at taking 
of Burgoyne's army." 

He was discharged at Soldier's Fortune, N. Y., March 11, 
1780, by Major Heywood. 

Alpheus Stone was Town Clerk of Oakham in 1788, and 
Selectman in 1789, 1790 and 1799. In 1786 he subscribed £2. 
toward the building of a house for Father Tomlinson. 

He was married in 1781 to Lucretia Nye, daughter of 
Ebenezer Nye, and lived on the farm afterwards owned by 
Dr. Charles Adams and now by Wallace Grimes. Children, 
bom in Oakham: Betsy, February 18, 1782, married Ezekiel 
Goodale of Hallowell, Maine, in 1804; Polly, December 29, 
1784; Lucy, January 21, 1786, married (i) Benjamin Water- 
man in 1805, (2) Peres Fobes, June 2, 1831 ; Lucretia, February 
18, 1788, married Knight Whittemore; Allis, March 30, 1790, 
married Peres Fobes in 1808; Harriot, September 5, 1792, 
married Jesse Fitts, March 19, 1816; Otis, October 9, 1795, 
married Susan Robinson June 9, 1818; Adaline Augusta, Octo- 
ber 26, 1798, married John Hammond, June 29, 1818; Louisa, 
July 28, 1801, married Joel Brimhall in 1822; Susan Maria, 
April 28, 1804, married Col. John Robinson, • 3d, December 2, 
1824, and, after Col. Robinson's death, married John Hammond, 
December 31, 1846. 

Alpheus Stone died in Oakham, March 31, 1829, aged 
seventy-two years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 171. M. S. R., xv, 83 (4)- Oakham V. R., 47, 48, 97, 
100, loi, 104, 130. Pension Application, Apr. 22, 1818, Subscription Paper 
for Mr. Tomlinson, May 3, 1786 (MS.). 



V 

THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 143 

Isaac Stone, 2d. 

Born in Rutland, June 2, 1753, O. S., the son of Isaac and Martha 
(Munroe) Stone. 

Isaac Stone, 2d, was one of the minutemen who marched 
with Capt. Crawford on April 19, 1775. Nine days later, April 
27, he enlisted for eight months in the 5th Co. of the 8th 
Mass. Regt., commanded by Col. John Fellows and stationed 
at Roxbury. On March 11, 1777, he enlisted for three years' 
service in the Continental Army, in Col. Nixon's 6th Mass. 
Regt., and was made Sergeant. The regiment served in the 
Northern Department under General Gates and his successors. 
He was not absent from the service between August 15, 1777, 
and February 16, 1779, except on furlough, and was in the 
engagement at Danbury, Conn., and at the battles of Stillwater 
and Saratoga. He was discharged March 11, 1780. 

He was married in 1782 to Hannah, daughter of Jonathan 
Bullard, and lived on the New Braintree road one mile west of 
the Oakham meeting house, on what is now known as the Butler 
farm. He had eight children, born in Oakham: Hannah, July 
23, 1783, married Seth Goodspeed in 1804; Achsah, January 
25, 1785, married William Broad in 1803; Salva, October 11, 
1787; John, August 15, 1789, died March i, 1790; Claracy, 
March 9, 1791, died July 30, 1793; Samuel, April 5, 1793, died 
April 10, 1793; Isaac, 3d, June 19, 1794; Sukey, August 16, 
1797, married James Conant, December 24, 1816. 

His son Isaac, 3d, married February 27, 181 5, Sally, daughter of 
John, 2d, and Susannah Robinson. They had two children. 
The eldest, Washington, was the father of George W. and 
John E. Stone, soldiers in the Civil War. 

Isaac Stone, 2d, the Revolutionary soldier, died November 25, 
1828, aged seventy-five years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165, 171. M. S. R., xv, 96 (2), (3). Oakham V. R., 
47, 48, 100, loi, 130, 131. Pension Application, Apr. 22, 1818. 



144 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Samuel Stone. 

Samuel Stone enlisted for a term of two months at Dorchester 
in 1776. He served as Corporal on the Rhode Island alarm, July 
23, 1777, and enlisted again August i, 1777, in Capt. Earll's Co., 
Col. Keyes's Regt., for a six months' campaign in Providence. 

His wife's name was Prudence. Children, bom in Oakham: 
Samuel, December 13, 1772; Daniel, June 19, 1774; Benjamin, 
February 27, 1776; Mary, June 20, 1778. He was chosen 
"Quorister" at a church meeting in Oakham held October 26, 

1775- 
A Samuel Stone was living in Oakham in 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188. M. S. R., xv, 118 (4), 119 (7)- Oakham 
V. R., 47, 48. Rutland V. R., 95, 197. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. U. S. 
Census (1790), Mass., 230. 



James Swinerton. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, May i, 1775, in Capt, John 
Grainger's Co., Col. Ebenezer Learned's Regt., for a term of 
eight months in the siege of Boston. * 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., xv, 321 (15). 



Thomas Taylor. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham for the term of three 

years in the Continental Army at Brookfield, September 15, 

1777, residence Oakham. He joined Capt. Reed's Co., Col. 
Alden's Regt. 

M. S. R., XV, 458 (3). 



Amos Temple. 

Enlisted May 28, 1775, for the town of Oakham, in Capt. 
Hazeltine's Co., Col. Fellows' Regt, for a term of eight months 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 45 

in the siege of Boston, and received a bounty coat November 
27, I775> at Dorchester. 

M. S. R., XV, 473 (4) [Tempil. Oakham = Fulham], (14), 



Joseph F. Thompson. 

EnHsted in response to the Resolve of June 5, 1780, in the 
Continental Army for six months, passed muster, and was put 
in Capt. Joseph Bates's Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) 
Regt. He received £18 bounty from the town of Oakham. 

. Oakham T. R, i, 251. M. S. R., xv, 648 (4). 

Joshua Turner. 

Born in 1/57, son of Joseph and Mercy (French) Turner. At the age 
of six years he was given by his mother to her brother, Lieut. Asa 
French, to bring up till he was twenty-one years of age. 

He enlisted May 2, 1775, in Capt. Hazeltine's Co., Col. 
Fellows' Regt., for a term of eight months in the siege of 
Boston. In December of the same year he reenlisted in Capt. 
Barnes' Co., Col. Ward's Regt., for a term of one month. 
He marched with Capt. Crawford on the Rhode Island alarm, 
July 23, 1777. August 8, 1777, he enlisted in the Continental 
Army for three years, residence Oakham, and was placed in 
Capt. Hastings' Co. of the i6th Mass. Regt., commanded by 
Col. Henry Jackson, and was in the battle of Saratoga. April 
30, 1780, he was in camp near Morristown, in a regiment under 
Col. Henry Jackson, made up of Massachusetts men from 
three decimated regiments, by an arrangement of April 9, 1779. 
He was discharged August 8, 1780, at Verplanck's Point, on 
the east side of North River. 

Joshua Turner died December 21, 1820, at Hadley, N. Y., 
aged sixty-three years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 165. M. S. R., xv, 854 (9) [Tomer], xvi, 177 (3). 
Pension Application, Apr. 18, 1818. Statement of Lieut. Asa French, in 
Addenda. Bailey, Early Mass. Marriages, ii, 81. 



146 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

James Upham. 

Born in Spencer, October 26, 1760, son of Jacob and Zerviah (Smith) 
Upham. 

He enlisted for the town of Oakham, August 15, 1777, in Capt. 
Earll's Co., Col. Keyes's Regt., and served four months and 
twenty days in Rhode Island. He served also for the town of 
Spencer in a campaign at Boston in 1776 and 1777, and in the 
Continental Army in 1779 and 1780. A descriptive list was taken 
July 7, 1780; age 19, stature 5 feet 9, complexion dark. 

M. S. R., xvi, 262 (2), (3), (4). Spencer V. R., 107. Draper, Hist, of 
Spencer, 258. 

Marshall Walker. 

Served from March 30 to July 2, 1778, guarding troops of the 
Saratoga Convention at the barracks in Rutland. He was also 
in Capt. Daniel Gilbert's Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., from 
August 2 to September 13, 1778, under General Sullivan in 
Rhode Island. 

Oakham T. R., i, 214. M. S. R., xvi, 467 (6). 



George Walls. 

George Walls was a soldier in the British Army, probably 
a Hessian, who was taken prisoner at Saratoga. He had either 
escaped or been paroled from the prison barracks at Rutland 
and, before July 13, 1779, he had found employment on a farm 
in Oakham. On that date his tax-rate was remitted by vote of 
the town on the ground of his being a British Regular. On 
October 12, 1779, the Council at Boston ordered all escaped or 
paroled prisoners to be returned to the Commissary of Prisoners 
and individual cases of British soldiers were brought before 
the House of Representatives for consideration. George Perkins 
and William O'Brien of Oakham were granted leave to remain 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 147 

in town by vote of December 20, 1779. On the same day a 
general order was issued: 

''That as divers German Troops have been impressed into the Service 
of the Brittish King and sent into this Country Contrary to their Inclina- 
tion and in Violation of the rights of humanity to Carry on this unnatural 
Warr against these states, and as Every Nation has a right to weaken 
the Armies of the power with which it is at warr — A. it is therefore 
further Resolved that any person or persons who made a part of the 
German Troops, in the pay & Service of the brittish King employ^ in 
the American War, under the Command of Gen^ Burgoyne or others, & 
who have left the Service of the said King and has resided within this 
state for the space of three months, by producing a Certificate from the 
Select men of the Town or Towns, within this state where they have so 
resided and have taken the Oath of Allegiance & Fidelity as afores'^ shall 
not be carried without said state, taken up or imprisoned, within it under 
pretence of their being prisoners of war unless the Council of said state 
from such persons Character & Conduct shall see fit to order it, or by 
general order of the General Court — B. Sent up for Concurrence." 

The Council on December 21 amended the bill so as to require 
a certificate from the Selectmen of the town and an oath of 
fidelity and allegiance before some one Justice of the Peace 
within the State to be designated after the bill had passed both 
Houses. The bill became a law the same day. George Walls 
undoubtedly availed himself of this opportunity. Fifteen months 
later, on March 26, 1781, under Resolve of December 2, 1780, 
he enlisted in the Continental Army for the town of Oakham 
for three years; age 24, stature 5 feet 7, complexion light, 
occupation farmer. 

Oakham T. R., i, 215, 239, 263 [The Deficient Man]. M. S. R., xvi, 496 
(9) [Waller], 510 (3) [Wallow]. Acts and Resolves, Prov. of Mass. 
Bay, V, 840-843. See William O'Brien, p. 117; George Perkins, p. 130. 



Kerly Ward. 

Enlisted from Oakham May 10, 1775, in Capt. Seth Wash- 
bum's Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Regt., and was made Corporal. 
He was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill, June 19, 1775, 
and his name does not again appear on the muster rolls. 



148 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

He came from Paxton and was married in Brookfield to Katie 
Graham, of Spencer, September 28, 1773. His son Samuel was 
baptized in Spencer August 7, 1785, there being no minister 
over the Oakham church at this time. 

Oakham T. R, i, 168. M. S. R, xvi, 538 (7)- Brookfield V. R, 430. 
Spencer V. R., 108. Draper, Hist, of Spencer, 198. 



Ezra Washburn. 

Marched on the Bennington alarm, August 20, 1777. 

In 1773 he purchased ten acres for ii2, and lived on the county 
road from Rutland to Brookfield, near where the South school- 
house now stands. He was living in Oakham March 30, 1782, 
when he sold the "Washburn orchard" to John Bothwell, but 
removed soon after to Stafford, Conn. 

Oakham T. R., i, 188. M. S. R., xvi, 653 (p) [Washborn]. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, Ixxxii, 487, xcii, 435. U. S. Census (1790), Conn., 137 
[Washbourn]. 

Lebbeus Washburn. 

Enlisted for the town of Oakham, May 27, 1775, as a Private 
in Capt. John Packard's Co., Col. David Brewer's (9th) Regt., 
for a term of eight months at Roxbury, and received money in 
place of a bounty coat, December 27, 1775. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168. M. S. R., xvi, 654 (8) [Washborn], 655 (13) 
[Washbun], 669 (s)- 

William Washburn. 

Marched with a detachment from the Oakham company on 
the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777, and on the Bennington 
alarm, August 20, 1777. He enlisted September 7, 1777, in Capt. 
Crawford's company raised in Hardwick, Oakham and New 
Braintree, for the Stillwater campaign, and was in the battles 
that resulted in the surrender of General Burgoyne. July 5, 
1780, he was engaged for three months in Capt. Timothy Paige's 



V THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 49 

Co., Col. John Rand's Regt., for service at West Point, and was 
made Corporal. He was discharged October lo, 1780. 

William Washburn, of Stafford, was married to Lucretia 
Darling, of Oakham, October 9, 1783. 

Oakham T. R., i, 187, 188, 252. M. S. R., xvi, 675 (7), xvii, 909 (12) 
[Woshburn]. Oakham V. R., 104. 



Perez Waterman. 

Born in Bridgewater in 1738, son of Perez Waterman who died in 
Bridgewater in 1793, aged Jimety years. 

He marched as First Sergeant with the minutemen from 
Bridgewater in Capt. Nathan Mitchell's company, in response to 
the alarm of April 19, 1775, and was in the service eleven days. 
May I, 1775, he reenlisted in Capt. James Allen's Co., Col. John 
Bailey's Regt., which was in camp near Boston. On July 10, 
1780, he was appointed Lieutenant and served three months and 
twenty-two days in Rhode Island. The regiment was detached 
from the militia to reinforce the Continental Army for three 
months. 

Mr. Waterman came to Oakham not long before 1798, when 
he is called in deeds "Perez Waterman of Bridgewater, Gentle- 
man." He purchased in 1798 of William Bothwell, for $2,900, 
three pieces of land: one hundred and fourteen acres lying west 
of the county road leading from Rutland to Brookfield ; forty-two 
acres, "buildings included," east of the county road from Rutland 
to Brookfield, and north of the county road from New Braintree 
to Worcester, and extending to the river ; and eight and one-half 
acres on the east side of the town road. These pieces of land 
constituted the Waterman farm, the greater part of which is now 
owned by Walter M. Robinson. A cellar-hole near the Wolf 
Meadow Dam, not far from the foot of the hill still known as 
Waterman Hill, is believed to mark the site of the original 
Waterman house. But Benjamin Waterman, and perhaps his 
father, lived in a house which was destroyed by fire in February, 
1840, situated where Mr. Robinson's house now stands. 



15° 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Lieut. Waterman was prominent in town affairs, and repre- 
sented the town in the Massachusetts Legislature in 1806. On 
July 20, 181 7, he was admitted to the Oakham Congregational 
Church. He died December 13, 1820, at the age of eighty-two 
years. The Worcester Spy of January 24, 1821, said of him: 
"He was a soldier in the old French war, an officer in the Revolu- 
tionary War, a worthy citizen, a professed disciple of Christ, and 
died supported by the Christian's hope." His widow, Abigail 
Waterman, was baptized and admitted to the church January 
13, 1822. 

Their children, the first six born in Bridgewater, were : Stephen, 
July 22, 1766, who led a seafaring life; Calvin, June 2, 1768, 
married Salome Allen in 1793; Ruth, April 7, 1770, married 
Nathan Hall of Bridgewater in 1790; Bethiah, May 15, 1772, 
married Moses Starbuck of Nantucket, January 13, 1801 ; Lydia, 
June 13, 1774, who was admitted to the Oakham Church on 
October 14, 1821 ; Barnabas, September 23, 1776, married Sally 
Thatcher of Wareham; Abigail, who married Perez Waterman 
Bartlett of Montague, February 10, 1808; Lucy, who married 
Samuel Kingsley, October 27, 1818; and Benjamin, who mar- 
ried Lucy, daughter of Alphaeus Stone in 1805, and died Octo- 
ber 13, 1817 at St. Mary's, Ga. All of the nine children of Perez 
Waterman were living in 1820 excepting Ruth and Benjamin. 

M. S. R., xvi, 689 (6). Oakham V. R., 100, 104, 132. Oakham Church 
Records, i, 13, 18. Mitchell, Hist, of Bridgewater, 170 [Nathan Hall], 
333 [The statement that Perez Waterman married a second wife, Ruth 
Nye of Sandwich, in 1784, is incorrect unless he married a third wife of 
the same name as his first. His wife, Abigail, is mentioned in his will 
dated 1820, and she joined the Oakham Church at an advanced age in 
1822], Spy, Jan. 24, 1821 [Dec. i3=Dec. 18]. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, 
cxxxvii, 51, 52. Letter of Mr. Walter M. Robinson of Oakham. South 
Cemetery Record Book (MS.). Wore. Co. Prob. Records, Jan. 10, 
1821. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. N. E. Hist. & Gen. Reg., xxxix 
(1885), 90. Bridgewater Town Clerk's Records. 






I 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 151 

Nathaniel Weeks. 

Born in Hardwick, October 8, 1744, eldest son of Thomas and Katharine 
(Clark) Weeks, who were married April 3, 1743. 

He has credit on the town records for a term of five months in 
New York in 1776. He marched August 20, 1777, on the 
Bennington alarm, and served as guard at Cambridge, beginning 
July 2, 1778. 

Nathaniel Weeks came from "Way (Ware) River, County 
of Springfield." In 1773 he purchased, for £44, thirty-two 
acres in Lot No. 31, near the middle of the lot. 

He married Mercie Richmond, February 16, 1769. Children : 
Thomas, married Ruth Willis in 1798; Lucy, married James 
White, son of Thomas and Sarah White, in 1788; Susanna, 
married Elijah Freeman, December 29, 1799; Nancy, married 
Allen Ripley, of Wilton, N. H., in 181 1; Martin, married 
Hannah Foster, of New Braintree, in 1818, died of apoplexy 
December 27, 1841, aged fifty-nine years. 

The granddaughter of Nathaniel Weeks, Susanna Freeman, 
born March 27, 1810, became the wife of Benjamin Labaree, 
President of Middlebury (Vt.) College, on October 25, 1836. 

Nathaniel Weeks died January 13, 181 1. His will was filed 
February 13, 181 1. His widow Mercie died in Oakham August 
31, 1850, at the age of one hundred years. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 188. M. S. R., xvi, 795 (3). Oakham V. R., 27, 
51, 104 [Week], 132. New Braintree V. R., 121. Rev. D. Tomlinson's 
Notes. Gravestone Record in Pine Grove Cemetery. Wore. Co. Prob. 
Records, Feb. 12, 1811. Oakham Church Records, i, i. General Cata- 
logue, Middlebury College (1890), 12. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, xcv, 448. 
Paige, Hist, of Hardwick, 529. Plymouth Co. Marriages, 41. 



John Wheeler. 

Enga'ged for the town of Oakham April 9, 1777, for three 
years in the Continental Army, in Capt. Daniel Shay's Co., Col. 
Rufus Putnam's Regt. He was appointed Sergeant and served 



152 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

till April, 1780. It is uncertain whether he was credited to 
Oakham or Hardwick. 



M. S. R., xvi, 975 (3)- 



Nahum Whipple. 



Born in New Braintree, November 18, 1760, son of Thomas and 
Martha Whipple. 

He enlisted for the town of Oakham May 5, 1777, as Private 
in Capt. E. Hodges's Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., which 
was stationed at North Kingston in Rhode Island. He was 
discharged July 5, 1777, and received pay for two months and 
seven days, including travel home. 

He was married April 11, 1782, to Lucinda Ashley. She died 
October 8, 1825, and he was again married to Mrs. Parmela 
Thompson, in April, 1826. 

Nahum Whipple was living in Oakham in 1796, at the Dr. 
John Dean place, but later removed to New Braintree, where he 
died March 18, 1829, aged sixty-eight years. 

M. S. R., xvii, 16 (2). New Braintree V. R., 55, 123, 160. U. S. Census 
(1790), Mass., 230. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, cv, 445, 446. 



Joshua Whitcomb. 

Enlisted September 15, 1777, at Brookfield, for a term of 
three years in the Continental Army for the town of Oakham, 
and was assigned to Capt. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt. 

He served also for the town of New Braintree at Ticonderoga 
in 1776, and on the Rhode Island and Bennington alarms, in 1777. 

M. S. R., xvii, 33 (8), 34 (2). 



Thomas White. 

Marched with Capt. Crawford on the Bennington alarm, 
August 20, 1777. He was Private in Capt. Joseph Cutler's com- 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 153 

pany of volunteers raised in Western (now Warren) and 
Oakham to reinforce the army under General Gates, which 
marched September 24, 1777, and was in service thirty-two 
days. October 19, 1779, he enlisted in Capt. Joseph Richard- 
son's Co., Col. Samuel Denny's Regt., which was raised for 
three months' service at Claverack. He also has credit on the 
town records for four months' service in the siege at Boston 
and two months at Providence. 

Thomas White came to Oakham from New Braintree and 
bought in 1762, from William Thomson, Jr., of Leicester, for 
£48, two hundred and forty acres in Lot No. 33, and two gussets, 
adjoining Lot No. 33, of forty acres and eighty acres respectively. 
A part of this land is at present included in the farm of C. P. 
McClanathan. He was six times Moderator, four times Select- 
man, and a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspec- 
tion and Safety in 1775 and 1776. When in 1775 Oakham was 
given the right of representation in the Great and General Court, 
Thomas White was the first Representative sent by the town, 
serving in this office in 1775, 1776 and 1778. 

November 26, 1761, he married Sarah Blair, of New Brain- 
tree. Children, bom in Oakham: Mary, September i, 1762; 
Elizabeth, October 3, 1764; James, December 4, 1766; David, 
July 15, 1770. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188, 189, 242. M. S. R., xvii, 137 (9), 138 
(3), (11). Oakham V. R., 51. New Braintree V. R., 123. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, xliii, 349 [indexed as 1761 at Worcester]. 



Ebenezer Whitman. 

Born in Bridgewater in 1752, son of Zechariah and Eleanor (Bennett) 
Whitman, and descendant in the fifth generation of John Whitman of 
Weymouth. 

He enlisted for the town of Oakham August 18, 1781, as a 
Private in Capt. Joseph Elliot's Co., Col. William Turner's 
Regt., for service in Rhode Island, from which he was discharged 
November 27, 1781. 



154 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

In 1778 he purchased of George Slocom of Medway, for 
£550, "a small farm with all the buildings thereon," bounded 
on the north by the county road from Rutland to Hardwick, 
on the east by the town road that leads from the county road 
to the Foster corner. He lived here till 1787, when he sold this 
place to George Caswell and removed to what was afterwards 
known as the Whitman farm, in Lot No. 25, not far from the 
Samuel Crawford farm. 

He was married, November 9, 1779, to Ruth Delano. A 
daughter, Sarah, was born in Oakham, October 12, 1780. A 
daughter, Ruth, married Seth Pratt, Jr., son of Capt. Seth 
Pratt, of Barre, May 24, 1819, and v^/as living on the Whitman 
farm in 1857. 

Ebenezer Whitman died in 1788. His widow, Ruth Whitman, 
married John Hooper, December 9, 1790. 

Oakham T. R., i, 276, 285, 294, ii, 9. M. S. R., xvii, 199 (12) [Whit- 
mond]. Oakham V. R., 51, 105. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Mitchell, 
Hist, of Bridgewater, 336, 338. Note of Dea. Jesse Allen. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, Ixxx, 384, cv, 571. Farnani, John Whitman of Weymouth, 
Mass., 50, IIS, 116 [Spooner should be Hooper]. Letter of Mrs. Clarinda 
C. Hunt of Hyde Park, Mass. Baker's Map of Worcester Co. 



Shubael Wilder. 

Engaged for the town of Oakham early in 1777, for three years 
in the Continental Army, and was in Capt. Daniel Shay's Co., 
Col. Rufus Putnam's Regt. He was Drum Major, and served 
till February 17, 1780. It is uncertain whether he was credited to 
Oakham or Hardwick. 

M. S. R., xvii, 351 (5). 

Guile Willis. 

Enlisted August 14, 1779, in Capt. Simeon Cobb's Co., Col. 
Samuel Fisher's Regt., for a term of one month in Rhode Island. 

M. S. R., xvii, 505 (4). 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 1 55 

Alexander Wilson. 

Served three months in New York in the last part of 1776, 
and was Sergeant in Capt. Joseph Cutler's company of volunteers 
raised in Western (now Warren) and Oakham, which marched 
September 24, 1777, to reinforce the army under General Gates 
and was in serv^ice thirty-two days. 

He was one of the signers of the petition of June 23, 1773, 
for the organization of a Congregational Church in Oakham, and 
was a member of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 
and Safety in 1778. 

His wife's name was Huldah. They had a son, Jonathan, 
bom in Oakham, January 28, 1769, and a daughter, Huldah, 
baptized June 11, 1775. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 189. M. S. R., xvii, 558 (4). Oakham V. R., 52 
[Willson]. Rev. J. Dana's Notes. Oakham Church Records, i, i. 



Robert Wilson. 

Enlisted in the summer of 1776 for a term of three months in 
New York and served in Rhode Island from August 2, 1778, to 
September 13, 1778, in Capt. Daniel Gilbert's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt. 

Robert Wilson came from Rutland and was a weaver by trade. 
He bought of Alexander Bothwell in 1765 eighty acres, with a 
house and barn standing thereon, in the southerly part of Lot 
No. 26. In 1767, one hundred and seventy-six acres in the north- 
erly part of Lot No. 26, belonging to Robert Wilson, were sold to 
Asa Partridge of New Braintree for unpaid taxes. In 1770 he 
sold to Joseph Felton, for £37 i6s. 8d., fifty-seven acres with 
the buildings standing thereon in Lot No. 25, which he had 
bought of James Craige, Jr. Robert Wilson was living in 
Oakham in 1790. 

In 1779 he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John 
Crawford. They had five sons and eight daughters. Some 
time after 1790 he removed with his family to the westerly part 
of Vermont. 



156 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 214. M. S. R., xvii, 547 (4) [Willson]. U. S. 
Census (1790), Mass., 230. U. S. Census (1790), Vt., 58 [Elizabeth Wil- 
son]. Crawford Family of Oakham, 11. Wore. Co. Reg. of Deeds, liii, 
203, Ivii, 257, Ixxxi, 19. 



Ebenezer Woodis. 

Enlisted for two months' service in the siege of Boston and 
was made Sergeant. February 15, 1776, he gave receipt for 
ammunition to Capt. Barnabas Sears at Dorchester. He 
marched with Capt. Crawford in the detachment of the Oakham 
company on the Rhode Island alarm, July 23, 1777, and on the 
Bennington alarm, August 20, 1777. 

Ebenezer Woodis bought of James Craige, Jr., February 20, 
1766, part of Lot No. 25. He was one of the signers of the 
petition of June 23, 1773, for the organization of a Congre- 
gational Church in Oakham. That he was much respected and 
trusted is shown by his election for three years on the Committee 
of Correspondence, Inspection and Safety. In 1786, administra- 
tion papers were filed in settlement of Ebenezer Woodis's estate. 

He married Dorothy Moore in Sudbury, September 16, 1762. 
Children, the first two born in Sudbury, the others in Oakham: 
Edward, September 8, 1763; Sarah, February 13, 1765; Eben- 
ezer, Jr., May 10, 1767, married Elizabeth Woolcott, January 6, 
1791 ; Persis, August 8, 1769; Keziah, September 5, 1771 ; 
Ruth, February 2.y, 1774; Reuben, March 22, 1776; Nathan, 
March 26, 1778; John, May 16, 1780. 

Oakham T. R., i, 168, 187, 188. M. S. R., xvii, 825 (7) [Wooddis], 
827 (8). Oakham V. R., 52, 107. Rev. D. Tomlinson's Notes. Sudbury 
V. R., 156 [Woodes], 290. Oakham Church Records, i, i. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, Iviii, 185. Wore. Co. Prob. Records, 1786. 



THE WAR OF 1812 



The Company Book of the Washington Grenadiers contains the Action 
of the Council, with the approval of the Governor, dated October ii, 1813, 
authorizing the formation of a company of Grenadiers in the towns of 
Oakham and New Braintree; the Order of Major General Caleb Burbank 
for carrying the same into effect; the Enlistment with the signatures of 
the thirty-seven men who joined the company before September 10, 1814; 
the daily reports of guard duty at Boston; the history of the company 
till 1829; and the signatures of one hundred and forty-nine men who 
joined after November 7, 1814. 

The Biographical Sketches of the members are based chiefly on Oakham 
Town and Vital Records, recollections of James Allen and Stephen 
Lincoln, and the writer's personal acquaintance with several other 
members of the company. 



THE WAR OF 1812. 

The people of Massachusetts, and indeed of all the New 
England States, disapproved of the second war with England, 
At a town meeting held on July 13, 1812, the citizens of Oakham 
declared by vote ( i ) their strong opposition to a war with Great 
Britain, and (2) their disapproval of an alliance with France. 
At the same meeting three college graduates, Rev. Daniel Tom- 
linson (Yale 1781), Dr. Seth Fobes (Brown 1804), and William 
Crawford, Jr. (Dartmouth 1807), were appointed a committee 
to draw up a memorial for peace, and nine men were chosen 
to circulate the memorial for signatures. 

But after the war was begun, and when it seemed probable 
that the enemy might set foot on Massachusetts soil, William 
Crawford, Jr., a member of the committee to draw up a 
memorial for peace, was one of the first to raise a company for 
this service. 

The following report of a committee of which David Cobb 
was chairman, was accepted by the Council of the State of 
Massachusetts, October 11, 1813, and approved by the Governor 
on the same day: 

"On the petition of W™ Crawford Jr., and other inhabitants of the 
towns of Oakham & N. Braintree praying that they with such others as 
may herewith join them, may be formed into a Company of Grenadiers; 
that their request be granted and that they be annexed to third Regiment 
of the first Brigade of the seventh Division, it being understood that no 
standing Company belonging to the said Regiment be thereby reduced 
below the number required by law." 

By order of Joseph Famsworth, Brigadier General of the 
First Brigade, Lieut. Colonel Thomas Wheeler, Commandant 
of the Third Regiment, transmitted, on December 13, 1813, to 
Wm. Crawford, Jr., the vote of the Council, and the orders for 
carrying the same into effect issued by the Adjutant General, and 
by Major Caleb Burbank, with the following note: 



l6o SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

"To W™ Crawford Junr. 

In obedience to the above written orders you are hereby directed to 
enlist a Company of Grenadier Soldiers out of the towns of Oakham and 
New Braintree, and when you have enlisted 34 you will make a return 
of their names to me so that measures may be taken to elect Officers 
to command said Company, you will make out at the head of your 
enlistment a Caption stiling it the enlistment of a Company of Grenadiers 
according to the afore mentioned grant." 

Thirty-seven men from the two towns enlisted in the company 
which was called the Washington Grenadiers. The following 
was the enrollment: 

ENLISTMENT OF A COMPANY OF GRENADIERS 

We whose names are underwritten do voluntarily enlist as soldiers 
in the company of Grenadiers annexed to the 3d regiment, ist brigade, 
and 7th division of the militia of Massachusetts, and do by this our 
voluntary act consider ourselves bound to all intents and purposes to 
perform the several duties which may devolve on us as members of 
said company. 

James Allen Lot Conant 

Jonas Brimhall James Conant, Jr. 

Thomas Haskell Daniel Flint 

Richard K. Marsh Stephen Lincoln, Jr. 

Isaac Stone, Jr. Mason Clark 

Seth Stone Zenas Dow 

Michael Lincoln Ashbel Pepper 

James Barr, Jr. Daniel Dow 

Ebenezer Howard Jacob Pepper, Jr. 

Perley Granger Jonathan Blake 

Ebenezer N. Barr Harlow Thrasher 

Edward Woodis, Jr. Sylvester Morse 

Samuel Thrasher, Jr. Charles T. Holmes 

Roswell Converse Hiram Barr 

Daniel Warner John Adams 

John Thompson William Crawford, Jr. 

George Mullett Perley Ayres 

Fabian Tomlinson Percival Hall 
Elias Marsh, Jr. 

William Crawford was commissioned Captain of the company, 
James Barr, Lieutenant, and James Allen, Ensign. James 
Conant, Michael Lincoln, Stephen Lincoln, and Edward Woodis 
were appointed Sergeants, and Jonas Brimhall, Corporal. John 



THE WAR OF l8l2. l6l 

Thompson and Sylvester Morse were Fifers, and Lot Conant 
and George Mullett, Drummers. 

Toward the close of the summer of 1814, after the capture 
of Washington and the burning of the Capitol and the President's 
house, it was believed that the British were planning to make an 
attack upon Boston, and, in accordance with orders from head- 
quarters, Captain Crawford issued the following : 

New Braintree, September 10, 1814. 
The company under my command being ordered into the actual service 
of this State are ordered to appear at Knight Whitmore's in Oakham 
on Sunday, the nth day of September inst., at five o'clock in the 
forenoon, from thence to march to Boston to do Duty in the service 
of this commonwealth. 

William Crawford, Jr., 

Captain. 

The company assembled according to orders, on Sunday morning 
on the Oakham Common, and after fervent prayer by Father 
Tomlinson, the soldiers parted from their friends and set out 
on the road to Boston. A severe campaign was expected, and 
those left behind had little hope of seeing again all the young 
men who marched that morning from Meeting-house Hill, 
Elizabeth Crawford wrote a few days later to her brother, Cap- 
tain Crawford: 'T, with my sisters, were at the meeting house 
with heavy hearts when you marched from town, and the greater 
part of the people that were there. shed tears at your departure 
and your company's." 

The regular military company of Oakham was also in training, 
expecting soon to be called to follow the Grenadiers. William 
Crawford, Sr., wrote to his son. Captain Crawford, under date 
of September 20, 1814: "We worked yesterday and this fore- 
noon on the Common and have made great alterations in it.* 
The company in this town is to train on Thursday this week, 

* The Common was the parade ground. The old meeting-house 
which stood near the center of the Common had just been torn down, 
and there was much material to be removed and some grading to be 
done to make it more suitable for company movements. There was 
no level cleared field near the center of the town. 



l62 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

and, by special orders, ori Saturday to appear. with all equipment 
ready to marcli at the shortest notice."- 

The Grenadiers occupied neafly three days on the march to 
Boston, arriving at camp at one o'clock P. M., September 13. 
The order to march came so suddenly that the Captain had to go 
without his uniform. This was made by his sisters, three school 
teachers, from cloth purchased for six shillings a yard from 
Knight Whitmore at his store in the center of the town, and 
taken ten days later to Boston by "Esquire Jesse Allen," who 
seems to have made frequent trips between Oakham and the 
camp at Boston while the Grenadiers were there. 

Two members of the company did not go. Lieutenant Barr 
died September 8, two days before the order to march was 
received; and Thomas Haskell is said to have sent John 
Macomber as a substitute, but this name is not found on any 
muster roll of the company. 

The soldiers in this company were the picked young men of 
the two towns of Oakham and New Braintree. With one 
exception, the men from Oakham were between twenty and 
thirty years of age, and all were unmarried. As grenadiers 
ought to be, they were all tall men, every one being six feet or 
over. They were known at Boston as the tall company, and 
attracted much attention by the perfection of their movements 
under the discipline of Captain Crawford. 

The British ships appeared ofif Boston, but the troops did not 
land. The last guard duty by the Grenadiers at Boston was on 
Wednesday, October 28, 1814. The company was temporarily 
released from further service and ordered home, reaching Oak-' 
ham November 7. As they came in sight of the center of 
the town, they saw for the first time the gilded ornaments on 
the tall spire of the new meeting-house, which had been com- 
pleted during their absence. 

A copy of the pay roll of the Washington Grenadiers, made 
out by Captain Crawford, hangs in the Historical Room of the 
Fobes Memorial Library in Oakham. 

Fourteen members of this company who served at Boston en- 
listed from Oakham, and one other spent, the greater part of 
his life in Oakham. 





WILLIAM CRAWFORD, JR. 
• Captain 



JAMES ALLEN 
Ensign 




JAMES CONANT, JR. 
Sergeant 




1856 



STEPHEN LINCOLN, JR. 
Sergeant 



THE WAR OF l8l2. 1 63 

William Crawford, Jr. 

Born October 5, 1783, third son of Captain William Crawford, the 
clockmaker, and grandson of Alexander Crawford, one of the nine 
heads of families who came from Rutland and settled in the West Wing, 
which became the town of Oakham. 

William Crawford, Jr., was graduated from Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1807, and studied medicine but did not practice. He 
settled in Oakham and was one of its most prominent citizens. 
He was chosen to represent the town in the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature in 1813, 1824, 1834, 1840, and 1845; was State Senator 
in 1825 and 1826; and was delegate to the Massachusetts Con- 
stitutional Convention in 1820. He served the town as Town 
Clerk from 1813 to 1815, and from 1817 to 1836, as Selectman 
in 1813, 1817, 1818 and 1835, was for many years a member of 
the School Committee, and was a well-known teacher in the 
common schools of this and neighboring towns. 

From 1836 to 1850 he was a member of the Board of County 
Commissioners of Worcester County. In the June meeting of 
the year 1838, he assumed the chairmanship of the Board, and 
he was Chairman continuously from that time up to and includ- 
ing the June meeting in the year 1850. He was an expert road 
maker. The writer of the article on Roads in C. F. Jewett's 
"History of Worcester County" said: 

"The Commissioners have been among the most energetic men of 
the County. Colonel Lincoln and General Crawford were men of 
large capacity and have had worthy associates. Before the decease 
of the latter, the Chairman of the Board, it was stated by one very 
familiar with the subject that within two generations the County roads 
had undergone so great improvement that the same number of horses 
or oxen could draw twice as much tonnage from the extremities to 
the center of the County in the same time as they could have done 
at the beginning of the period." 

Captain Crawford continued in the State Militia and in 1821 
became Brigadier General of the First Brigade of the Sixth 
Division of Massachusetts Militia. 

Mr. Crawford lived at the original Crawford place till 1842. 
when he built a house on a hill west of the residence of his 
brother Alexander, where he spent the remainder of his Ufe. 



1 64 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

He was married, September 30, 1846, to Sophia Cunningham, 
of Leicester, the fifth daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah Cunning- 
ham, of Spencer, and had one child, William Channing Crawford, 
who was born January 10, 1849. 

General William Crawford died July 25, 1864. His portrait 
hangs in the office of the County Commissioners in Worcester. 



James Allen. 

The only son of Deacon Jesse and Abigail Allen, was born in 
Oakham, July 2, 1792. 

He studied in preparation for college at Leicester Academy, 
but on account of uncertain health did not enter college. He 
followed his father on the farm lately owned by L. N. Haskell, 
until 1835, when he sold his farm for five thousand dollars and 
put the money into the firm of Potter & Allen, merchants in the 
center of Oakham. The financial crisis of 1837 followed, and 
the firm was forced into insolvency. Mr. Allen after this lived 
for some years in that part of the Fairbank house now occupied 
by H. P. Wright. In 1858 he purchased the house built by 
Phineas Morton, in which his son. Deacon Jesse Allen, still 
resides. He was a competent and accurate surveyor and a born 
teacher. He taught in the district schools and in the select 
schools of Oakham for forty-two years. It is impossible to 
measure his influence for good over the young people of Oakham 
during this long period. 

His fellow townsmen honored him by electing him to offices 
of responsibility. He was Selectman six years, member of the 
School Committee thirty-two years, Town Clerk eighteen years, 
member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives four 
years and of the State Senate three years. He was also County 
Commissioner of Worcester County three years. In 1817, when 
twenty-five years of age, he was elected Deacon of the Oakham 
Church, and held the office fifty-three years. 

He was commissioned Ensign, May 11, 1814, Lieutenant, 
January 27, 1S15, Captain, May 17, 1817. 



THE WAR OF l8l2. 1 65 

He was married, (i) February 21, 1816, to Polly L., daughter 
of Nathaniel Crocker, of Paxton. She died July 5, 1841. He 
was married (2) September 10, 1842, to Hannah H. Parker, 
of Dunbarton, N. H. Children, all bom in Oakham: Louisa, 
April 24, 1817; Stoughton Willis, June 6, 1820; James, July 4, 
1822; Abigail, May 30, 1825; Mary L., September i, 1827; 
George, April 3, 1829; Lucy, February 27, 1830; Maria, June 
21, 1832; Emily Kimball, September 13, 1835; Louisa Parker, 
July 12, 1843 5 Hannah Merriam, May 9, 1845 5 Jesse, May 23. 
1847; Martha Bird, April 7, 1849. 

Deacon James Allen died June 18, 1870. His portrait hangs 
in the office of the County Commissioners in Worcester. 



Perley Ayres. 

Born April 30, 1792, eldest son of Jabez Ayres, of New Braintree, 
and a descendant in the fourth generation of Jabez Ayres, of Newbury. 

Perley Ayres was a competent school-teacher and a man of 
unusual ability. He was living in New Braintree at the time 
of his service in the Washington Grenadiers, but after teaching 
several winters in the center school in Oakham, he came, in 
1837, to Oakham to reside and purchased from Timothy Nye, 
for four thousand dollars, the farm of one hundred and thirty- 
nine acres, still known as the Perley Ayres farm, and now owned 
by Thomas C. Gaffney. Here he lived till 1869, when he sold to 
Samuel B. Fairbank and removed to the house west of the 
village where his daughters Louisa and Eunice now reside. 

May I, 1826, he was married to Grace Mason Tidd. Mrs. 
Ayres died January 21, 1838, and he married (2) Harriet W. 
Knight, daughter of Silas Knight of Oakham, August 29, 1838. 
Children, all born in Oakham: Sarah Grace, July 14, 1839; 
Louisa Allen, January 30, 1841 ; Hiram, September 29, 1842; 
Charles Perley, April 30, 1844; Eunice Harriet, December 25, 
1845 j Katherine Amelia, October 22, 1847. 

Perley Ayres died in Oakham, October 11, 1880. 



1 66 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Jonas Brimhall. 

Born in 1794, son of Samuel and Eunice (Humphrey) Brimhall, who 
came from Barre and lived on what is still known as the old Brimhall 
place, afterwards the home of Dr. Seth Fobes. Samuel Brimhall died 
in Oakham, February 3, 1812, aged sixty-two years. 

Jonas Brimhall was married March 21, 1824, to Caroline Nye, 
daughter of Timothy and Parnal (Allen) Nye. He lived for 
many years at the Four Comers, near the schoolhouse in the 
North District. His son, Elisha Brimhall, born March 25, 1825, 
removed to Clinton in 1847, where he became a prominent mer- 
chant, and held various town offices. He was Chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen for several years. Town Treasurer 
from 1865 to 1871, Representative in the General Court in 1871, 
and State Senator in 1876 and 1877. 

Jonas Brimhall died in Oakham March 13, 1856, at the age 
of sixty-two years. 

Mason Clark. 

Born in Medway, June 5, 1789, the son of Amos and Ursula 
(Richardson) Clark, grandson of Amos and Hannah (Craig) Clark, 
and brother of Simeon and John C Clark, of Oakham. 

Mason Clark came to Oakham with his parents about 1800. 
November 4, 1813, he married Patty Johnson of Medway. July 
ID of the same year he purchased of Samuel Tenney, for 
$328, a half acre of land, with the buildings thereon, which were 
(i) the original part of the house owned and occupied by the 
late A. J. Holden and (2) a shoe-shop where W. W. Russell's 
house now stands. He was a shoemaker by occupation. From 
1819 to 1824 he was living in Coldbrook, where he was a 
licensed innkeeper. 

James Conant, Jr." 
Lot Conant. 

Sons of Captain James Conant, a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 
Lot Conant was born in Oakham, May 8, 1785; James Conant was 
born in Oakham, December 5, 1793. 



THE WAR OF l8l2. 167 

James Conant married Susan, daughter of Isaac and Hannah 
(Bullard) Stone, December 24, 1816. Children, all born in 
Oakham: Harriet Shattuck, May 11, 1817; George Fay, April 
10, 1819; Joseph, September 14, 1821 ; John, February 21, 
1823; Susan, February 6, 1826; Louisa, September 27, 1828; 
Eliza Ann, June 6, 1831 ; Albert Steuben, April 18, 1835 ; Maria, 
August I, 1838; Henry Lafayette, July 19, 1841, 

James Conant continued in the militia service and was chosen 
Lieutenant of the Grenadiers, July 14, 1823, and Captain, April 
5, 1826. He was farmer and merchant, and lived on the old 
Turnpike, a little east of Pine Grove Cemetery. He died March 
10, 1867; his widow, Susan (Stone) Conant, died January 30, 
1877. 

Lot Conant married (i) Patty Stone, September 30, 1813; 
(2) Polly McClellen, March 16, 1815. Children: Samuel, born 
October 3, 1816; Luke, born June 4, 1817; Henry, born May 
8, 1819; Walter, born March 17, 1821 ; Thomas, born April 
15, 1823; Mary H., born July 8, 1825; Abigail S., born January 
22, 1828; Louisa L., born June 3, 1830; Sarah Jane, born June 
22, 1834; George W., born June 20, 1837. 

He was by occupation a farmer. In 1827 he was living in 
Oakham, but, in September, 1830, he removed to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, where he died October 14, 1868. 

Daniel Flint. 

Born in Oakham, July 21, 1787, son of John and Phebe Flint. John 
Flint came to Oakham from Rutland in 1779 and purchased for £150 
sixty acres of land lying north of the estate of William Harper, and 
still known as the Flint farm. He had seven children, born in Oakham. 
His sister Lucy married Joel Hayden, a Revolutionary soldier. His 
widow, Phebe Flint, died February 19, 1837, aged eighty-four years. 

Daniel Flint married, May 30, 181 5, Mary, daughter of 
James Boyd, a soldier of the Revolution. Children: Mary 
Adaline, born June i, 1817; Daniel Waldo, born March 22, 1819; 
Ebzada Lienor, born June 11, 1823. 

Daniel Flint lived on the Flint farm till his death, November 
20, 1837. 



1 68 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Percival Hall. 

Son of Percival Hall, a farmer of Oakham, and grandson of Dr. 
Percival Hall, a widely known physician of New Braintree. His 
father married Betsy, daughter of Thomas White, in 1791, removed 
from New Braintree to Oakham in 1792, and purchased of George 
Thrasher for £265 los. the farm in the westerly part of Oakham since 
known as the Hall place, where he lived till his death, March 10, 1843. 
His widow died January 11, 1845, aged seventy-nine years. 

Percival Hall, of the Washington Grenadiers, was married to 
Viana White, June 15, 1826. Children: Lucinda White, born 
February 13, 1827, married Benjamin Nourse May 9, 1854, 
died January 8, 1867; Ambrose Porter, born August 28, 1829, 
died September 29, 1896. Mr. Hall lived on the home place 
till his death, August 5, 1875. 



Stephen Lincoln, Jr. 

Born in Oakham, November 29, 1792, son of Stephen Lincoln, a 
soldier in the Revolution, and of Lydia (Foster) Lincoln. 

He lived on the farm purchased by his father in 1783 from 
the heirs of Silas Hill, till April i, 1834, when he bought of 
James C. Fairbank, for one thousand dollars, a farm containing 
thirteen acres, with the buildings thereon, which now forms a 
part of the farm of Miss Laura G. Burt. He was a manu- 
facturer of sieves and a pioneer of the wirework industry in 
Oakham. Li 1848 he made his son William his partner, forming 
the firm of S. & W. Lincoln, manufacturers of wire goods. 

Pie was twice married: (i) February 6, 1823, to Betsey 
Brooks, daughter of Jonas Brooks of Princeton; (2) April 2, 
1829, to Martha Ward Skerry, daughter of Captain Samuel 
Skerry, of Salem, Mass. Children: Elizabeth Wilder, born 
November 11, 1824; William, born February 27, 1826. 

Stephen Lincoln was chosen Lieutenant of the Grenadiers, 
April 20, 1820, but did not long continue in the service. He 
died October 25, 1886, in the ninety-fourth year of his age, the 
last survivor of the Washington Grenadiers. 



THE WAR OF l8l2. 169 

Elias Marsh, Jr. 
Richard Kelley Marsh. 

Sons of Elias and Esther Marsh. Elias Marsh, Sr., married Esther 
Berry in Barre, August i, 17/6; came from Rutland to Oakham about 
1780 and purchased in 17S1, of Thomas Read, Jr., of Rutland, one-half 
of Lot No. 3, later known as the Drury place and extending from the 
East Hill Road to the Rutland town line. He died in Oakham, April 
23, 1838, at the age of eighty-three years. Richard K. Marsh was born 
June 7, 1791; Elias Marsh, Jr., was born May 21, 1795. 

Elias Marsh, Jr., married Maria Buss, of Sterling, in 1819. 
Children, born in Oakham: Mary Houghton, July 12, 1820; 
Martha Elmira, November 4, 182 1 ; Sophronia Berry, August 
25, 1823; Rebeckah Mason, March 20, 1825. About 1830 he 
removed with his family to Elizabeth, N. J., where he died at 
an advanced age. 

Richard Kelley Marsh, generally known as Kelley Marsh, 
married Rowena Johnson in 1818. Children, born in Oakham: 
Julia Ann, August 21, 1820; Luther, July 13, 1822; Oscar 
Ferdinand, April 25, 1824; Maria Augusta, September 27, 1826. 
Kelley Marsh, after his marriage, lived at the Sumner Barr 
place, and later in the first house on a road long since closed, 
which left the present Coldbrook road below Henry Bullard's 
and continued past the houses of Aaron and Solomon Parmenter, 
the old schoolhouse, and the burying ground, and joined the old 
Coldbrook road, closed in 1913, about a quarter of a mile above 
the present Boston and Maine railroad station. He died April 
22, 1858, aged sixty-five years. 



Isaac Stone, 3d. 

Born in Oakham, June 19, 1794, son of Isaac, 2d, and Hannah (Bul- 
lard) Stone. His father, Isaac Stone, 2d, a Revolutionary soldier, was 
son of Isaac Stone, who came from Rutland to Oakham in 1765 and 
became the leading citizen of the town during and following the period 
of the Revolutionary War. 



lyo SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Isaac Stone, 3d, married February 27, 181 5, Sally Robinson, 
who was born in Northboro May i, 1789, daughter of John 
Robinson. Children: Washington Stone, born August 4, 1816; 
Ann Robinson, born April 11, 1818. Isaac Stone, 3d, died Octo- 
ber 24, 1822, at the age of twenty-eight years; his wife died 
September 21, 1818, at the age of twenty-nine years. 

Fabian Tomlinson. 

Born in Oakham, January 19, 1793, son of Rev. Daniel and Lucy 
(Beard) Tomlinson. Daniel Tomlinson was born in Derby, Conn., May 
20, 1759, graduated at Yale College in 1781, studied theology with Rev. 
Dr. Charles Backus' of Somers, Conn., and was ordained over the 
Oakham Congregational Church June 22, 1786. He was married to Lucy 
Beard of Derby, Conn., November 23, 1786. 

Fabian Tomlinson was a farmer and lived on the Tomlinson 
place, which his father had purchased from James Hunter in 
1786. He continued in the militia service and was commissioned 
Captain of the Washington Grenadiers, January 18, 1830. His 
resignation of the office of Captain was accepted November 17, 
1831. 

He was married to Sarah T. Hunter, March 28, 1816. Chil- 
dren, born in Oakham: James, December 28, 1816; Daniel, 
March 23, 1818; William, March 27, 1821 ; Dolly, December 
20, 1822; Fabian, November 6, 1824; Lucy, March 24, 1826; 
Jane, January 7, 1828; Maria, August 18, 1829; Nancy, Septem- 
ber 3, 1837. 

Fabian Tomlinson died in Oakham, August 12, 1885, aged 
ninety-two years. 

Edward Woodis. 

Born in Oakham, July 24, 1790, in the house which stood at the foot 
of the hill east of the farm which is now owned by George W. Stone. 
He was son of Ebenezer Woodis, and grandson of Sergeant Ebenezer 
Woodis, a Revolutionary soldier. 

Edward Woodis removed to New Braintree when a young 
man, continued in military service, was chosen Lieutenant of the 
Washington Grenadiers, May 30, 1821, and Captain, July 14, 1823. 



THE WAR OF l8l2. 171 

April 9, 1825, he married Catherine Hohnes, of New Brain- 
tree. Their children were: Luther Wilson, born June 22, 1827; 
Catherine, born March 26, 1828; Edward, born October i, 1829; 
Henrietta, born August 19, 1832; Alden Bradford, born October 
6, 1834. 

Mr. Woodis died in New Braintree, December 4, 1841, at the 
age of fifty-one years. 



The following citizens held the important town offices during 
the three years 1 812-1814: 

Town Clerks : 

Moses Brown, 1812. 

William Crawford, Jr., 1813, 1814. 

Treasurer : 

Isaac French, 1812, 1813, 1814. 

Selectmen : 

Simeon Haskell, 1812, 1814. 

Joel Jones, 1812, 1814. 

William Crawford, Jr., 1813, 1814. 

Peres Fobes, 1813, 1814. 

Isaac French, 1812. 

John Robinson, 1812. 

Moses Brown, 1812. 

Silas Bullard, 1813. 

John French, 1813. 

Abner Lincoln, 1813. 

Jonas Clapp, 181 4. 



SEMINOLE AND MEXICAN WARS. 

Two Oakham men served in the United States Army between 
the War of 1812 and the Civil War. 



Isaac Davis Rice. 

Born July 3, 1801, son of Joseph and Mary Rice. 

Isaac D. Rice was a soldier in the Seminole War (1835-42). 
He enlisted in the regular army of the United States and con- 
tinued in the service nearly ten years. After his discharge from 
the army, he returned to Oakham and lived at what is still known 
as Rice Corner. He was Chairman of the Committee which in 
1843 erected the Methodist Church in the center of the town, and 
contributed about three-fifths of the entire cost of the building. 

April 19, 1846, he was married to Mrs. Julia Ann Rice, widow 
of Henry Rice and daughter of Richard Kelley and Rhoena 
(Johnson) Marsh. They had one daughter, Rhoena Augusta, 
born June 19, 1849, married May 7, 1874, to Hudson L. Arms. 

Mr. Rice died in North Brookfield, March 25, 1880, at the 
age of seventy-eight years. 



Algernon Sidney Crawford. 

Born in Oakham, April 27, 1805, son of James and Molly (Butler) 
Crawford, and grandson of Captain William Crawford, the clockmaker. 

He married Eliza Fay, and had one son, James Crawford. In 
1846 he had his name changed by Act of the Massachusetts 
Legislature from Algernon Sidney Crawford to Algernon 
Sidney Butler. 

Soon after the declaration of war against Mexico, he enlisted 
at Worcester in the service of the United States, and is said to 
have died at Puebla, Mexico, in 1847. 



THE CIVIL WAR 



The record of military service of the Oakham soldiers in the Civil War 
is taken chiefly from Oakham Town Records, Adjutant Generals' Reports, 
T. W. Higginson's Mass. in the Army and Navy, 1861-65, and Regimental 
Histories. The writer was personally acquainted with nearly all the men 
from the town who served in this war, but, for greater accuracy and 
completeness, the Biographical Sketches have been read, with careful 
attention to names and dates, by the soldiers themselves or, when these 
were not living, by members of their families. 

Massachusetts Infantry regiments in which men enlisted from Oakham 
are arranged in numerical order. These are followed by the Cavalry 
and Heavy Artillery. Within the regiment, those who enlisted from Oak- 
ham are placed before those born in Oakham or living here after the war, 
who enlisted from other towns. Oakham men who enlisted in other 
states are arranged alphabetically and placed after those who served in 
Massachusetts organizations. 



THE CIVIL WAR. 

Until the attack on Fort Sumter, it was not generally believed 
at the North that there would be war between the two sections. 
The North had lived so long in peace that it did not know 
what the evils of war were, and was wholly unprepared for a 
long and hard struggle. The young men were not accustomed 
to military training, and there was no such universal interest 
among them in manly sports as is seen everywhere to-day. But 
when war had actually begun, and it was evident that the Union 
could not be preserved without a conflict of arms, the men of 
the North responded promptly and seemed ready to make any 
sacrifice in defence of the government. 

The method of recruiting in Massachusetts differed from that 
pursued in many of the states. In general, each Massachusetts 
regiment was raised from a comparatively small section of the 
state, and each company in the regiment represented a town or 
a group of near-by towns. As the war advanced and new levies 
were called for, the state formed new regiments instead of rais- 
ing recruits to fill up the ranks in the regiments already in the 
field. If the men who reenlisted are counted twice, as they were 
on the town's quota, about four-fifths of the Oakham men who 
enlisted for the town were in the 25th, 34th, 36th, and 51st 
regiments of infantry and in the 4th cavalry. The last was a 
state organization. The four infantry regiments were all raised 
in Worcester County, as were also the 15th and 21st. 

In response to the call of April 15, 1861, for three-months' 
regiments, Massachusetts sent nearly four thousand men to the 
front with little delay. The 4th and 6th regiments left Bos- 
ton on April 17, and the 6th made its bloody march through 
Baltimore on April 19. May 3, the President called upon the 
North for thirty-nine regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, 
to serve for a period of three years, but it was not until May 19 
that the quota of the state was assigned. The ist Massachusetts 
Regiment left for the front on June 15, and the 2d on July 8. 



176 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

2d Mass. Infantry. 

Charles Sumner Green. 

Mustered in, May 25, 1861. 
Died in the service. 

Born October 5, 1839, in Coldbrook, in the town of Oakham, the eldest 
child of George S. and Sophronia Green, and brother of Lyman Smith 
Green, and of Eliza Jane Green, the wife of F. P. Kimball. 

Charles S. Green was a shoemaker living in the village of 
Coldbrook, and enlisted from Oakham in Co. F, 2d Mass. 
The regiment was organized at Camp Andrew, on the famous 
Brook Farm in West Roxbury. Co. F, with seventy-eight men, 
arrived in camp May 14. On July 8 the regiment left Camp 
Andrew one thousand and thirty-five men strong, went to the 
front, and joined the command of Major General Patterson at 
Williamsport. In December, 1861, it went into winter quarters 
at Frederick, Md., and with three other regiments occupied what 
was called "Cantonment Hicks," named in honor of Governor 
Hicks of Maryland. This camp was in a pleasant wood, four 
miles east of Frederick, on the Baltimore pike. The hospital was 
supplied by the Sanitary Commission. 

Charles S. Green was the first man from Oakham to join the 
army at the outbreak of the Civil War. Within one month of 
the attack on Fort Sumter, he left his work and enlisted in a 
regiment forming in the eastern part of the State. When the 
regiment left Camp Andrew, he was detailed as regimental 
wagoner. At Camp Hicks he was taken ill with fever, and died 
January 30, 1862. 

loth Mass. Infantry. 

Nathaniel W. Colton. 

Mustered in, June 21, 1861. 

Discharged, October 5, 1862. 

Address, Veterans' Home, Napa Co., Cal. 

Born in West Springfield, Mass., November 3, 1836. His father was 
Chauncey Colton, of Long Meadow, who removed to Oakham about 



THE CIVIL WAR — lOTH MASS. INFANTRY 177 

1848; was village Postmaster from 1851 to 1855, and Selectman in 1856. 
In 1830 he married Lavinia H. Ware of Oakham, sister of James B. and 
A. Hazen Ware. 

Nathaniel W. Colton was a shoemaker living in Springfield 
when the war began. He enlisted May 31, 1861, at the age of 
twenty-five, in Co. F, loth Mass. The regiment went into camp 
June 14; left for the South July 25, and was encamped during 
the winter at Brightwood, near the residence of Francis P. Blair, 
Jr. March 27, 1862, it started down the Potomac to Fortress 
Monroe; was engaged with loss at Fair Oaks, May 31, and 
heavily engaged at Malvern Hill, July i. Colton was with 
McClellan through the peninsular campaign from March to July, 
and contracted disease, on account of which he was discharged 
for disability. 

After recovering his health, he followed his occupation in Oak- 
ham, Worcester, Springfield, and Lynn, Mass., and in San Fran- 
cisco. In 1893 he was admitted to the Veterans' Home, Napa 
Co., Cal. 

nth Mass. Infantry. 
William A. F. Noyes. 

Mustered in, August 3, 1861. 
Discharged, August 8, 1862. 

Born in Oakham, November 9, 1822, son of Luther and Azuba (Smith) 
Noyes, and descendant in the sixth generation of Rev. James Noyes, of 
Newbury, who came to New England in 1634. His father, Luther Noyes, 
of Oakham, was born in Shrewsbury, May 2, 1776, and was the son of 
Daniel Noyes who served in the Revolutionary War, in Col. Jonathan 
Ward's regiment. 

William Noyes taught school in Oakham when a young man. 
He built the house on the Coldbrook road just north of William 
S. Crawford's carriage repository. About 1850 he removed to 
Ashland, from which place he enlisted as a musician, in the nth 
Mass., and served till the bands were discharged by the order 
of the War Department in 1862. 



178 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

After his return he lived in Ashland. He was a good citi- 
zen and held the offices of Selectman and Assessor in that town 
for several years. He was a charter member of the Col. Prescott 
Post, G. A. R., of Ashland. 

June 2, 1844, he was married to Harriet A. Fitts, of Oakham, 
and had three children : Charlotte, born December 6, 1848, mar- 
ried Thomas M. Robinson in 1866; Charles F., born September 
9, 1854, married Alice E. Nelson; Chester S., born September 
9, 1854, married Mary J. Whitehouse in 1885. 

Mrs. Noyes died November 25, 1885, at Ashland. Soon after 
1900 Mr. Noyes removed to Farmington, N. H., where he died 
February 16, 191 1. 

13th Mass. Infantry. 

William Bird Kimball. 

Mustered in, July i6, 1861. 
Mustered out, July 11, 1864. 

Born in Oakham, June 2, 1833. His father, Rev. James Kimball, pas- 
tor of the Congregational Church in Oakham from 1832 to i860, was born 
in Bradford, Mass., October 5, 1797, and was a graduate of Middlebury 
College in the Class of 1820 and of Andover Theological Seminary in 
1823. His mother was Emily Parker, who was born in Groveland, Mass., 
September 5, 1800, and was one of the early teachers of Bradford 
Academy. 

William B. Kimball was graduated at Amherst College in 
1856. February 17, 1858, he was married, in Enfield, Mass., to 
Frances C. Woods, daughter of Josiah B. Woods, who was born 
in Enfield and was closely identified with the early development 
of the industrial resources of his native town. Mr. Woods was 
for many years a manufacturer of flannels and satinet goods. 

Mr. Kimball located in Westboro, buying the historic farm 
known as the Maynard place, on the Northboro road. He was 
one of the first to enlist in the Westboro company of the 13th 
Mass., raised in May, 1861, and was mustered in as Corporal of 
Co. K. A few days later he was made Orderly Sergeant. His 
genial manners and sunny disposition made him universally 





CHARLES SUMNER GKEEN 
2tl Mass. Infantry 



EDWARD FRANKLIN WARE 
15th Mass. Infantry 





WILLIAM HARRISON BULI.ARD 
25th Mass. Infantry 



SERGEANT WILLIAM I. TEMPLE 
25th Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR — I3TH MASS. INFANTRY 1 79 

beloved by the soldiers, and he was pronounced the best orderly 
sergeant in the regiment. He was made Commissary Sergeant 
of the regiment, May i, 1862, and was commissioned Second 
Lieutenant, May 25 of the same year. February 28, 1863, he was 
promoted to First Lieutenant. He bore an active part in the 
disastrous battle of Chancellorsville, in May, 1863, and at Gettys- 
burg, July I, 2, and 3 of the same year. He was appointed Cap- 
tain, October 4, and assigned to the command of Co. K, on 
December 9. He was in the series of battles in May and June 
from the Wilderness to Petersburg, and was mustered out at the 
expiration of his term of service. 

When he returned from the war, the farm in Westboro had 
been sold, and Mrs. Kimball had removed to Enfield. He joined 
her there and made this town his residence for the remainder 
of his life. The people of Enfield honored him from year to 
year with almost every office in their gift. He represented the 
town in the State Legislature, was Selectman, Town Clerk, 
Treasurer, Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, and served as a mem- 
ber of the School Board for thirty years. He died at Enfield, 
January 22, 1908. 

An appreciative obituary notice, written by Lieut. W. R. War- 
ner, was pubHshed in the Westboro Chronotype of Friday, Febru- 
ary 7, 1908. Mr. Warner said of him: "A flood of tender 
recollections comes pouring in upon me as I recall Kimball's 
always calm exterior and noble scorn of death. He was always 
the same man all through his life of seventy-four years, gener- 
ous to a fault, unassuming, often forgetful of self, and always 
mindful of others." 

15th Mass. Infantry. 
Edward Franklin Ware. 

Mustered in, July 12, 1861. 
Died in the service. 

Born August 28, 1835, in Oakham, son of Archibald and Caroline 
Cutler (Cooley) Ware. His father was son of Archibald Ware, who 
came to Oakham before 1797, when his name appears on the town records. 



l8o SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Edward F. Ware was a shoemaker working at Brookfield 
when he enlisted, at the age of twenty-six, in Co. F, 15th Mass. 
The regiment assembled at Camp Scott, August 8; three weeks 
later was at Poolville, Md., on picket duty on the Potomac River. 
Here, on September 23, 1861, Edward Ware died, the second 
man to die in the regiment and the first soldier from Oakham to 
die in the war. 

Amos B. Dean. ! 

Mustered in, February i, 1862. 
Discharged, May i, 1862. 

Born in Oakham, October 2, 1833, son of Dr. John and Nancy (Parks) 
Dean, and brother of Levi L. Dean of Co. H, 2d Mass. Heavy Artillery, 
and of Eliza Dean, the second wife of Andrew Spooner, of the 51st 
Mass. Dr. John Dean was son of Deacon James Dean, one of the first 
ten settlers of Oakham. 

Amos B. Dean, a mechanic, enlisted, at the age of twenty-nine, 
from North Brookfield in Co. F, 15th Mass., and was discharged 
for disability after three months' service. 

Not long after his return from the army, he removed from 
North Brookfield to Hiawatha, Kansas, where he died in Novem- 
ber, 1903. 

Albert Henry Foster, 

Mustered in, July 12, 1861. 

Mustered out, July 11, 1864. 

Address, North Brookfield, Mass. 

Born November 12, 1839, in New Braintree. He was son of James R.* 
Foster, who was born in Middleboro, February 24, 1798, and of Nancy 
(Henry) Foster, who was born in Rutland, September 20, 1796. They 
were married August 22, 1822. Mrs. Foster was daughter of Lieut. Sam- 
uel and Mary (Gates) Henry, and sister of Samuel G. Henry and of 
Mrs. Rufus Gould, the mother of Dr. John W. Gould, 25th Mass., and of 
Rev. Edwin S. Gould, sist Mass. James R. Foster was a resident of 
Coldbrook in 1821 ; later he lived in Rutland and in New Braintree. 
In 1848 he purchased the Sheers Berry farm in the west part of Oak- 
ham, now known as the Foster farm, on which he and Mrs. Foster lived 
till their death. Mr. Foster died May 4, 1875; Mrs. Foster, April 17, 
1880. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 15TH MASS. INFANTRY 18 1 

Albert H. Foster went to North Brookfield when fourteen 
years of age and was employed in the Batcheller shop. May i, 
1861, at the age of twenty-one, he enlisted in Co. F, 15th Mass.; 
was promoted from Corporal to Sergeant, March i, 1863; was 
taken prisoner in the battle of Ball's Bluff, October 21, 1861, 
and was in prison in Richmond four months. He was in the 
battles of Fredericksburg, May 3, 1863, and Gettysburg, July 
2 and 3, July 28, 1863, he was detailed on detached service in 
Boston Harbor. 

At the expiration of his term of service he returned to North 
Brookfield and resumed work in the Batcheller shop, where he 
was employed till 1879, when he established himself in the coal 
business, in which he still continues. He has been for several 
years a member of the Board of Investment of the North Brook- 
field Savings Bank. 

He was married (i) January ii, 1865, to Addie M. Ashby, of 
North Brookfield, who died, February 3, 1892; (2) December 
13, 1894, to Alice W. Smith, of North Brookfield. Children: 
George B., born September 16, 1868, died September 8, 1869; 
Harold Abbott, born May 15, 1871 ; Frank Webster, born June 

13, 1874- 

Harold A, was married in April, 1893, to Jean Kidder, of Bos- 
ton, and has three children: Albert Edward, Maynard Ashby, 
and Elizabeth. He was appointed Postmaster of North Brook- 
field in 1902 and held that office till the close of the Taft admin- 
istration. 

Frank W. was in the telephone business in North Brookfield 
from 1895 till September, 1910, when he removed to Oakland, 
California, where he is in the employ of the Cyphus Incubator 
Company. 

2ist Mass. Infantry. 
Georg-e Lyman Caldwell. 

Mustered in, July 19, 1861. 
Died in the service. 

Born in Oakham, May 16, 1838, son of George and Eliza (Parker) 
Caldwell. His father, George Caldwell, son of James and Mary (Blake) 



1 82 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Caldwell, was born in Oakham, June 27, 1818, and died in Oakham, 
January 4, 1881. Eliza Parker Caldwell probably came from Warren. 

George L. Caldwell, at the age of twenty-three, a mechanic, 
enlisted from the town of Oakham in Co. K, 21st Mass., and was 
made Sergeant. The 21st regiment was organized in Worcester, 
at Camp Lincoln ; left Worcester, August 23 ; went to Annapo- 
lis; was selected for the Bumside expedition, December 16; took 
part in the battles of Roanoke Island, Newbern, Manassas, 
Chantilly, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. In February, 1863, it 
was sent to Kentucky to serve as part of the 9th Corps in the 
Department of the Ohio. In August it moved to Camp Nel- 
son on the Kentucky River. 

George Caldwell died November 17, 1863, at Camp Nelson. 
It was reported that he was killed while in his tent, by the 
accidental discharge of a gun which a soldier was cleaning in 
an adjoining tent. 



Isaiah Dean. 

Mustered in, February 29, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 12, 1865. 
Address, Barre Plains, Mass. 

Born in Oakham, March 21, 1845, son of Elijah and Delotia (East- 
man) Dean, and brother of Seth and Daniel W. Dean of Co. K, 36th 

Mass. 

In the winter of 1864 he enlisted, at the age of nineteen, for 
the town of Barre, in Co. K, 21st Mass. Late in October, 1864, 
after the members of the regiment whose time had expired had 
been discharged, he was transferred to the 36th Regiment. On 
June 8, 1865, the remnants of the 21st and 36th Regiments were 
transferred to the 56th, from which they were discharged at the 
close of the war. 

December 16, 1870, he was married in Oakham to Susan A. 
Simmons, daughter of Job and Sarah Simmons. His wife died 
June I, 1887. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 1 83 

25th Mass. Infantry. 

Twenty-one men from Oakham enlisted in Co. H, 25th Mass. 
in the late summer of 1861, and three whose early home had been 
in Oakham enlisted in the same company from other towns. 
One Oakham man joined Co. A in 1862. This was a Worcester 
County regiment, organized at Camp Lincoln in the city of Wor- 
cester, largely under the charge of Capt. A. B. R. Sprague. It 
was mustered into service from September 26 to October 12, 
and left the state October 31 for Annapolis, where it was 
encamped for about two months. While stationed here, the Oak- 
ham men were visited on December 14 by Washington Stone and 
William R. Gould, who brought letters and delicacies from home. 
They remained two days, and, after visiting the city of Washing- 
ton, stopped again for two days on their return. 

The regiment formed part of General Foster's ist Brigade in 
the Burnside expedition to North Carolina and was given the 
right of the line ; took a prominent part in the battle of Roanoke 
Island, February 8; was engaged at Newbern, March 14, 
remained on provost duty in the city till May 9, and was later 
at the front. As part of the 3d Brigade, it shared in the Golds- 
boro expedition in December, supporting the batteries at Kinston, 
supplying volunteer sharpshooters at Whitehall, and was active 
at Goldsboro. In December, 1863, the regiment was ordered to 
Newport News, Va., where four hundred and thirty-two men 
reenlisted, who returned in February, 1864, to Massachusetts on 
furlough. 

The command was reunited March 26, forming part of General 
Heckman's Red Star Brigade, i8th Army Corps. In the recon- 
noissance to the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, Edwin Wil- 
bur and Lorenzo K. Lovell were wounded, May 6, 1864, at Port 
Walthal Junction. From May 6 to May 16, the regiment was 
under fire nine days. In Beauregard's daybreak attack on the 
right flank of the Union troops at Drury's Blufif on May 16, 
1864, the 25th fought against overwhelming numbers till it was 
surrounded by the enemy, and then fought its way out, saving 
its colors and organization. The regiment lost sixteen killed, 



184 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

sixty wounded, and sixty-nine prisoners. Willard A. Frink and 
Henry H. Ware were killed, Jonathan G. Warren was wounded, 
and David O. Lovell was wounded and taken prisoner. At Cold 
Harbor on June 3, in the unsupported charge of Heckman's 
Brigade on the strongest position in the Confederate line, the 
25th lost fifty-three killed, one hundred and thirty-nine wounded, 
and twenty-eight prisoners, making a total loss of two hundred 
and twenty out of three hundred men fit for service who 
answered to their names at roll call that morning. William H. 
Bullard and Lyman N. Parker were killed, and Corporals Julius 
D. Hill and George W. Stone were wounded. The regiment 
took part also in the assaults of June 15 and 18 at Petersburg, 
and remained on duty in the trenches till August 25. It was 
ordered to North Carolina, September 4, and stationed near New- 
bern. The original term of service expired in September, 1864. 
The reenlisted men, organized as four companies, forming the 
25th Mass. Battalion of Veteran Volunteers, united with Sher- 
man's army near Goldsboro, moved to Raleigh in April, and, 
after the surrender of the Confederate Army, to Charlotte, 
where they performed patrol and guard duty till the termination 
of the war. 

William Harrison Bullard. 

Mustered in, September 21, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Died in the service. 

Born April 22, 1840, in Oakham. His father was Joel Bullard, born 
October 7, 1796, son of Silas, a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Silas 
was the son of Jonathan Bullard, and was born in Weston, May 24, 
1746. 

William H. Bullard was a farmer living on the Silas Bullard 
place, when he enlisted at the age of twenty-one. At Cold Har- 
bor, June 3, 1864, he was severely wounded, falling among the 
living and the dead as the line went down before that fatal fire 
on three sides of the Angle into which the charge was made. 
Bullard could not cover himself, and was sl^t to death, lying 
on the ground between the lines, his living companions unable 
to help him. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 1 85 

In writing of this battle, Col. Higginson said: "Saddest of 
all was the vast number of wounded who expired in the narrow 
pass between the hostile lines, on the days following the battle, 
simply from the inability of their own friends to succor them." 

Sergeant White says of Bullard: "He was one of the reliable 
men of the company, and participated in all the battles up to 
the time of his death. His bravery was conspicuous at Drury's 
Bluff, May i6." 



Henry Willis Crawford. 

Mustered in, September 26, 1861. 
Discharged, August 30, 1862. 

Born in Oakham, November 29, 1829. His father was Hosea Willis 
Crawford, a captain in the militia and grandson of Capt. John Crawford 
who commanded a company in the Northern Army at the time of the 
surrender of Burgoyne. His mother was Caroline M. Gault, daughter 
of John and Rebecca (Kenney) Gault. 

Henry W. Crawford played double bass in Crawford's Cornet 
Band, and was known as "Big Henry," to distinguish him from 
Henry A. Crawford, who played the E Flat cornet. He 
enlisted as a musician in the regimental band of the 25th, and at 
the end of a year was discharged by act of Congress, and 
returned home. 

After his return, he lived in Oakham, Fitchburg, and Barre, 
and followed his trade of carpenter and builder. 

December 28, 1853, he was married to Lucy Ann Browning 
of Rutland. They had two children, both of whom died young. 
After the death of his wife, he was married again, October 31, 
1859, to Ellen Sibley of Barre. Children: Fred E., born in 
Barre, July 8, 1867, now police officer at Gilbertville, Mass., 
and Deputy Sheriff for the County of Worcester; George H., 
born in Barre, June 19, 1869, a machinist; Charles, born in 
Fitchburg, December 19, 1871, a teamster; Nellie A., born in 
Oakham, October 6, 1875, now Mrs. Ackland Eddy of Worcester, 
Mass.; Frank, born in Barre, December 21, 1878, a teamster. 

Mr. Henry W. Crawford died in Gilbertville, May 18, 1895. 



1 86 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Charles D. Dean. 

Mustered in, September 23, 1861. 
Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 

Born on June 9, 1843, at New Salem, Mass. His father was Charles 
Dean, son of Richard Dean, a soldier in the War of 1812 and a descend- 
ant of Walter Dean, who came from Chard, England, in 1637, and set- 
tled in Taunton, Mass. His mother was Abbie Deland of Andover, Mass., 
daughter of a Baptist minister. 

Charles D. Dean was nephew of Mrs. Alonzo Lincoln, and was 
living with Mr. Lincoln when he enlisted, at the age of eighteen, 
from the town of Oakham. He reenlisted as a veteran from the 
town of Sunderland. 

After the war, he was in the restaurant business for about 
twenty-five years. In 1895 he became a manufacturer of bak- 
ing powder. He lived in Somerville from 1892 to 1908, when he 
removed to Medford. He was Commander of the Willard C. 
Kinsley Post, 139, G, A. R. ; was Chairman of the Committee 
from the Post, which, in conjunction with a citizens' committee, 
made arrangements for the dedication of the Somerville Soldiers' 
Monument on May 30, 1909. 

July 4, 1869, he was married to Maria F. Leonard, of Boston, 
and had one child, Grace G. Dean, born August 25, 1870, mar- 
ried, January 5, 19 12, to Walter Shippard Smith, and now living 
at 7 Benham St., Medford, Mass. 

He died November 20, 1909, in the hospital of the Soldiers' 
Home at Chelsea, and was buried in Riverside Cemetery in 
Sunderland. The Somerville Journal said of him : "Comrade 
Dean was one of the most active, faithful, and efficient members 
of Post 139. Modest and unassuming in manner and conduct, 
he was always ready for duty at the call of his comrades." 

Sergeant White of Co. H. writes : "I remember Dean as one 
of our best soldiers, ever faithful, quiet, and self-respecting. He 
came out of the service a man, worthy of the respect of the 
world, as he had been of all his old comrades in arms." 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 187 

John Williams Gould. 

Mustered in, September 26, 1861. 

Discharged, August 30, 1862. 

Address, 23 Maywood St., Worcester, Mass. 

Born in New Braintree, June 12, 1840, brother of Rev. Dr. George H. 
Gould, and of Rev. Edwin S. Gould, Co. F, sist Mass. His father, Rufus 
Gould, was born in Charlton, Mass., September 3, 1792, son of Thomas 
and Hannah (Williams) Gould. Thomas Gould, born November 24, 1755, 
was in the Revolutionary army. John W. Gould's mother, Mary Henry, 
was daughter of Lieut. Samuel Henry, who was born in Rutland, Novem- 
ber 15, 1765, and was married in 1795 to Polly Gates. The Henry family 
came from Rutland to Oakham not far from the beginning of the 19th 
century. 

John W. Gould came to Oakham when he was nine years old. 
When thirteen, he sang alto in the church choir, and when six- 
teen, he joined Crawford's Cornet Band, being the youngest 
member. He organized a double quartette of mixed voices, that 
furnished acceptable music for social gatherings in Oakham for a 
number of years. He taught school in Ware and Hubbards- 
ton, teaching singing school at the same time in Hubbardston. 
In the spring of 1861, he, with his brother Edwin, and L. D wight 
Wood, entered Williston Seminary at Easthampton. The out- 
break of the war brought him home, and he enlisted as a musi- 
cian in the 25th regimental band. At the end of a year, all bands 
were discharged by act of Congress, and he returned home. 

The following spring (1863), the family removed to West- 
boro, and he began the study of dentistry with his uncle. Dr. 
Samuel G. Henry. In the spring of 1864 he opened an office 
for the practice of dentistry in Oakham, in the Irene Clapp house. 
March i, 1866, he estabhshed himself in Worcester, where his 
practice has been one of the best in the city, and his close 
attention to business has given him but little time for other 
things. 

When he went to Worcester, he united with the Old South 
Church, but when his brother, Rev. Dr. George H. Gould, became 
pastor of the Piedmont Church, he transferred his connection to 



1 88 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

that church, where he was one of the deacons for eight years. 
He has been a member of the Worcester Congregational Club 
almost from its beginning, of the Worcester County Dental 
Association, and of the Massachusetts Dental Society. 

In 1877 he was married to Nellie Melissa Muzzy. She was 
daughter of Alexander and Iris Melissa (Earle) Morrison of 
Leicester, and was adopted by Edwin A. Muzzy of Worcester 
after the death of her parents. Of a family of six children, only 
two are living : Dr. Ruf us Henry Gould, a graduate of the Har- 
vard Dental School, now in practice with his father. Mary 
Earle Gould, a graduate of Wheaton Seminary, now a teacher 
of music. 

f 

Julius Dexter Hill. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January, 18, 1864. 

Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 

Address, Littleton, Colo. 

Born in Spencer, Mass., August 13, 1842. His father, Dexter Hill, the 
son of Joshua Hill, came to Oakham in 1843. His mother was Eliza 
Prouty, daughter of Gardner and Ruth (Howe) Prouty. 

Julius D. Hill, at the time of his enlistment at the age of nine- 
teen, was clerk in the store of his uncle, Alanson Prouty, at 
Oakham. He was wounded at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864, but 
returned to his regiment and remained in the service till the 
close of the war. 

After the war, he was clerk in the Express Office in Worces- 
ter, Mass., for two years. In 1866 he went to Colorado, and 
in 1869 settled in Littleton. Here he began on a farm, but soon 
opened a general store and remained twenty-eight years in one 
place. He was Postmaster of Littleton for fifteen or twenty 
years. He disposed of his store, and with a partner established 
the Littleton Creamery. Competition forced them to merge with 
an eastern concern, and his company became part of the Beatrice 
Creamery Company. When a national bank was established in 
Littleton, he became Director, Vice-President, and Local Mana- 




DAVID OSCAR LOVELL 
25th Mass. Infantry 




HENRY HAZEN WARE 
25th Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 189 

ger, and he is now Vice-President of the First National Bank of 
Littleton. 

He was married in Littleton to Inez Berry, who came to 
Colorado from Maine with her father. Their daughter Eva 
married Ambrose Edwards. Children, born in Littleton : Dexter 
Hill Edwards in 1901 ; Berniece Edwards in 1904; Irvin 
Ambrose Edwards in 1907. 

Charles Frederick Howard. 

Mustered in, September 20, 1861. 
Reenlisted, January 19, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 13, 1865, 

Bom in Boston in 1843. His father was John F. Howard, who was 
born in Oakham, November 4, 1841, son of Martin and Vashti Howard. 
His mother was Charlotte Adams, born at Antrim, N. H., May 21, 1813, 
daughter of Dr. Charles and Sarah (McAllister) Adams of Oakham. 
Martin Howard came from Bridgewater, and was buried in Dorchester. 

Charles F. Howard was living in Oakham with his father on 
the farm now owned by Clayton Adams, when he enlisted at the 
age of eighteen in Co. H, and served through the war. 

After returning from the army, he lived in Boston and was 
employed in the Post-office Department. 

He died at Hyde Park, November 4, 1878. 

David Oscar Lovell. 

Mustered in, September 18, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Died in the service. 

Born March 29, 1839, in Oakham. His father was David Lovell, born 
in Franconia, N. H., March 24, 1809, son of Jonathan and Mehitabel 
(Knight) Lovell. He removed to Worcester with the family in 181 1, 
and when seventeen years old was sent to Sudbury to learn the shoe- 
maker's trade with Enoch Kidder, with whom he worked as an appren- 
tice four years. When twenty-one, he came to Oakham at the invitation 
of Samuel G. Henry. September 28, 1831, he married Hannah 
Osborn of Sudbury. About 1832 he built the house now occupied by 
William A. Nye, where he lived several years. Later he sold this house 



IpO SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

and purchased in 1847 the house built by James K. Hervey, which has been 
in the possession of the family till the present day. Here he built the 
Lovell shop, in which he worked as a shoemaker with his four sons. 

David O. Lovell was working with his father and brothers as 
a shoemaker, and was also keeping a livery stable, at the time of 
his enlistment. He was wounded at Drury's Bluff, May 16, 
1864, taken prisoner, and placed in the Libby Prison Hospital at 
Richmond. A few days after the battle, his father received the 
following letter from his son : 

"Richmond, Va., May 24, 1864. 

General Hospital 21, Ward D. 
Dear Father: — 

I was wounded on the i6th in the right leg and taken prisoner, and 
since have had my leg amputated. I am doing very well at present; think 
I shall be able to go to our lines the first opportunity. 

Your son, 

David O. Lovell." 

From lack of proper treatment, and with only such care as 
could be rendered by our own men, he grew worse, and died in 
the hospital, June 17, 1864. Sergeant Emerson Stone, who 
lost his hand in the same battle, and was also a prisoner, was 
with him when he died. 

Lorenzo Knight Lovell. 

Mustered in, September 20, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Discharged, July 8, 1865. 

Bom May 9, 1837, in Oakham, son of David and Hannah (Osborn) 
Lovell, and brother of David Oscar Lovell. 

Lorenzo K. Lovell began his studies in 1857 at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, in preparation for college, but on account of 
ill health he continued only two terms. The breaking out of the 
Civil War prevented him from returning later to the academy, as 
he had expected to do. He taught in the public schools of Oak- 
ham and of Sudbury. At the time of his enlistment he was 
working in the Lovell shop with his father and brothers, January 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 19I 

I, 1863, he was made Corporal. He was wounded at Port Walthal 
Junction, May 6, 1864. The wound in his shoulder did not heal 
and blood poisoning set in. When home on a furlough his own 
doctor took out the bullet which was imbedded in the bone. He 
was at the U. S. General Hospital in Readville, Mass., when the 
war ended. 

After he returned from the army he became bookkeeper for 
William Mills, a plumber of Boston, and lived in East Somer- 
ville till 1874, when he purchased a grocery business in Way land. 
He always took an active part in both town and church affairs. 
For many years he was Deacon of the church in Wayland and 
Superintendent of the Sunday School ; also Treasurer, and mem- 
ber of the Church Committee. He served the town l(5ng as 
Auditor and member of the School Committee. For fifteen years 
he was Postmaster of Wayland. 

Mr. Lovell was a member of the Order of Odd Fellows and 
was very active in the work of the society. He was Noble 
Grand, and, for several years. Chaplain. 

March 16, 1864, when he was home on furlough after his 
reenlistment, he married Mary T. Young of Sudbury, who died 
in the following year. In November, 1870, he was again married, 
to Emily S. Mills, daughter of William Mills, by whom he had 
four children: 

Mary Eleanor, bom October 13, 1871, in East Somerville; 
graduate of Bridgewater Normal School; now teacher in 
Waltham. 

WilHam Stone, born July 28, 1873, in East Somerville; has 
now a grocery store in Wayland and is an insurance agent. 

Ernest Mills, born July 5, 1877, in Wayland; graduated as 
Bachelor of Science from Tufts College in 1900; now Instructor 
in Physics in the Technical High School in Providence. 

Sarah Emily, born August 18, 1879, in Wayland; graduated 
as Bachelor of Arts from Tufts College in 1902 and received 
the degree of Master of Arts at RadcHffe, June 23, 1908; now 
head of the English Department in the Lowell Normal School. 

Lorenzo K. Lovell died in Wayland, December 19, 1909, and 
was buried in the shadow of Wadsworth's Monument in South 



192 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Sudbury. At the funeral the Odd Fellows formed a double line 
and marched in the procession to the edge of the village. 

"Both Lovells were fine Christian men, always true to their 
best ideals, and good soldiers, like all the Oakham men I knew 
in the 25th Mass." — H. Arthur White, Sergeant Co. H, 25th 
Mass. Inf. 

Charles H. Parker. 

Mustered in, September 20, 1861. 
Discharged, December 29, 1861. 

Reenlisted, December 5, 1863. 

Mustered out, July 30, 1865. 

Born in Brookfield, Mass., August 24, 1838, son of Aaron and Susannah 
Parker, and brother of Lyman N. and Edwin S. Parker. He came to 
Oakham from Princeton with his father and brothers, and lived here 
for a considerable part of his life. 

Charles H. Parker was working on a farm when, at the age 
of twenty-three, he enlisted for the town of Oakham. Three 
months after his enlistment he was discharged for disability; 
but after regaining his health, he reenlisted for the town of New 
Braintree, in the 59th Mass. This was the last Massachusetts 
regiment raised for three years. It was a veteran regiment, and 
was engaged in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Hatcher's Run. 
January i, 1865, he was transferred to the 57th Mass., and was 
mustered out at the close of the war. 

Mr. Parker was married, March 20, i860, to Lucy A. Barr, 
daughter of Davidson Barr, of North Brookfield, by whom he 
had six children: 

William Henry, born February i, 1861, married in Spencer, 
Mass., September, 1882, to Mary Parmenter, of Oakham. 

Sarah Jewett, born October 16, 1862, married March 2, 1883, 
to Fred Reed, of Oakham. 

Charles Edwin, born August 17, 1864, married in November, 
1883, to Nellie Davis, of Oakham. He was graduated as Doctor 
of Medicine from the University of Vermont in 1889, and prac- 
ticed in Princeton, Mass., till his death, July 10, 1905. 



THE CIVIL WAR 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 193 

George Lyman, born July 29, 1868, married December 25, 1889, 
to Lillian Robinson, of Oakham. 

Freddie Davidson, born August 9, 1874, died August 20, 1875. 

Frank Eugene, born May 11, 1877, married in Worcester, 
June 12, 1895, to Gertrude E. Walker. 

Charles H. Parker died in Oakham, March 15, 1881. 



Edv^^in S. Parker. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1861. 

Discharged, March 22, 1862. 

Reenlisted, July 13, 1863. 

Mustered out, July 29, 1865. 

Born September 2, 1843, in Brookfield, son of Aaron and Susannah 
Parker, 

Edwin S. Parker was by occupation a shoemaker, and enlisted 
at the age of eighteen for the town of Oakham. After six 
months' experience in the army, he was discharged for disability, 
resulting from malarial fever and rheumatism. 

In 1863, his health having improved, he reenlisted for the town 
of Holden in Co. A, 32d Mass. He was wounded May 11, 
1864, at Spottsylvania, and sent to the hospital at Chester, Pa., 
but returned to the regiment and was in the battle of Hatcher's 
Run, October 27. Exposure while on picket duty after this bat- 
tle brought on again an attack of rheumatism, from the effects 
of which he suffered during the remainder of his life. 

After the war he returned to Oakham, where he was married. 
May 31, 1866, to Mrs. Sophronia Frink, widow of Willard A. 
Frink of his first company and regiment, and daughter of Daniel 
and Sophronia (Raymond) Town. Children: 

Walter, born June 5, 1867, married October 9, 1883, to Emma 
E. Clark, of New Braintree, died October 28, 1908. 

Edith May, born February 21, 1869, married November 18, 
1885, to Frank Weld, of Oakham. 

Rosa W., born May 7, 1871, married September 18, 1885, to 
Edgar Crawford, of Oakham. 
13 



194 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Gertrude Anette, born May 17, 1873, married April 24, 1895, 
to Charles Cowen, of Barre. 

Lizzie Snow, born November 25, 1875, married November 17, 
1887, to William Woodcock, of New Braintree. 

Edwin S. Parker died in Oakham, April 14, 1899, 



Lyman N. Parker. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1861. 

Reenlisted, December 18, 1863. 

Died in the service. 

Born in Brookfield, February 5, 1841, son of Aaron and Susannah 
Parker. 

Lyman N. Parker was living with his father and younger 
brother in the Belknap house, and was working as a shoemaker, 
when at the age of twenty he enlisted with his brothers, Edwin 
S. and Charles H, Parker. He was a good soldier and one of 
the first in the regiment to decide to reenlist. 

On June 3, 1864, he was killed at Cold Harbor. He carried 
with him a medal on which was engraved his name and address. 
This was found on the field by a Confederate soldier, and was 
restored to his brother, Edwin S. Parker, several years after the 
close of the war. 

Charles D. Robinson. 

Mustered in, September 20, 1861. 
Mustered out, October 20, 1864. 

Born in Barre, Mass., November 25, 1836. His father was Marshall 
P. Robinson of Barre, vi^ho died in the West. His mother vi^as Mary 
Elizabeth (Perry) Robinson of Oakham, who died in Coldbrook. 

Charles D. Robinson was a mechanic living in Coldbrook, in 
the employ of William R. Whiting, when he enlisted at the age 
of twenty-five. He served three years and was discharged at 
the expiration of his term of service. 

After the war he followed his trade of woodworker at Ayer 
Junction for ten years, and afterwards in Worcester for the 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 195 

remainder of his life. He was Commander of the Grand Army 
Post at Ayer for two years. On his removal to Worcester, he 
was transferred to Post lo, of which he was a member at the 
time of his death. 

May 7, 1865, he was married to Lucy M. Walker, daughter of 
John Walker of Oakham and sister of John Albert Walker, a 
soldier in Co. C, 4th Mass. Cav. They had six children: 
Arthur Charles, born March 28, 1866; Albert Dennison, born 
April 27, 1867; Mary Lizzie, born September 7, 1870; George 
Perez, born October 27, 1871 ; Hattie Louise, bom December 
5, 1875; and a daughter born March 28, 1881, died same day. 

Charles D. Robinson died in Worcester, February 11, 1899, 
and was buried on Juniper Avenue in Hope Cemetery in that 
city. 

Mrs. Lucy M. Robinson resides at 5J^ Thomas Street, 
Worcester, Mass. 



Edward Josiah Sargeant. 

Mustered in, July 29, 1862. 

Reenlisted, March 30, 1864. 

Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 

Address, Morningdale, Boylston Center, Mass. 

Born August 4, 1841, at Mendon, Mass., son of Charles* A. and Susan 
(Brown) Sargeant, and grandson of Asa S. Sargeant of Franklin. His 
brother, Levander D. Sargeant, was in Co. F, sist Mass. Charles A. 
Sargeant came to Oakham in 1850, and in 1852 bought what is still 
known as the Sargeant place on East Hill, where he lived for many years. 

Edward J. Sargeant was a member of Crawford's Cornet 
Band. He enlisted at the age of twenty-one as a musician in the 
summer of 1862 in Co. A of the 25th regiment, and continued in 
the service till the close of the war. 

Since the war he has followed his occupation of carriage and 
sign painter and decorator in Oakham, Wilmington, Philadel- 
phia, Hartford, and Worcester. 

In 1876 he was married to Eunitia D. Wright, at Willimansett, 
Mass., by whom he had one son : Herbert Edward, born October 



196 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

20, 1877, and now a bookkeeper with the Warren Leather Goods 
Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. Eunitia Sargeant died at Oakham in April, 1891, and Mr. 
Sargeant was again married, March 17, 1900, to LilHan R. Web- 
ster in Hartford, Conn. 



Albert Spooner. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1861. 
Reenlisted, January 3, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 

Born January 22, 1822, in Oakham. His father, Deacon Andrew 
Spooner, born in Oakham, May 18, 1781, was the son of Eleazer Spooner, 
who was born in Dartmouth and removed to Oakham in 1776. Eleazer 
Spooner purchased of Deacon Jesse Allen for £383 6s. 8d., a tract of 
land, with the buildings thereon, containing about one hundred and fifty- 
five acres, on which he lived till his death. Deacon Andrew Spooner 
married Sally Adams, of Hopkinton, Mass., October 26, 1805, and had nine 
children. 

At the outbreak of the war Albert Spooner was living in Oak- 
ham and was employed in the wirework manufactory of Lincoln 
& Ayres. He enlisted at the age of thirty-nine and served till 
the end of the war. 

After returning from the army, he lived for a few years in 
Oakham and later in Hammonton, N. J. In July, 1872, he 
removed to North Brookfield, which was his residence for the 
remainder of his life. He was Deacon of the Congregational 
Church in North Brookfield, and served the town as Cemetery 
Commissioner. He presented to the Oakham Congregational 
Church a communion service. 

May 25, 1847, he married Sarah Maria Woolworth, of Barre, 
by whom he had two children: William Henry, born in Oak- 
ham, April 16, 1848, died in Hammonton, N. J., December 17, 
1870; Curtis Edwards, born in Oakham, January 22, 1850, now 
located in business at 1035 Lombard St., Philadelphia. He is a 
dealer in antique furniture and reproductions. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 1 97 

Mrs. Sarah M. Spooner died March 15, 1872, at Hammonton, 
N. J., and Mr. Spooner was again married, to Mrs. Cynthia R. 
(Putnam) Hambry, in North Brookfield, November 24, 1872. 
His second wife died May 24, 1895. 

Mr. Albert Spooner died in North Brookfield, February 9, 
1900. 

George Washington Stone. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 

Address, Oakham, Mass. 

Born in Spencer, August i, 1840, son of Washington and Martha (Rob- 
inson) Stone, and descendant in the fifth generation of Isaac Stone. The 
Stone family has been prominent in Oakham for nearly one hundred 
and fifty years. Isaac Stone came from Rutland to Oakham in 1765, 
and held all the offices in the gift of the town. His son, Isaac Stone, 
2d, served as Sergeant three years in the Continental Army. Isaac Stone, 
3d, was a soldier in the War of 1812. Washington Stone, the father of 
George, was five years Selectman, and represented the town in the 
Massachusetts Legislature in the year 1850. 

George W. Stone, a farmer living with his father, enlisted at 
the age of twenty-one, and was appointed Corporal. He was 
wounded at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864, but rejoined his regi- 
ment and served through the war. 

After the war, he returned to Oakham and has since lived on 
the home place, succeeding his father, who had died during his 
absence. He has been three times Selectman, and represented the 
district in the Massachusetts Legislature in 1901, being a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Military Affairs. He was a member 
of the Republican Town Committee for forty years, and was a 
member of the Building Committee of the Fobes Memorial 
Library. 

He was married to Eleanor Hill, daughter of Joshua and Sally 
(Morse) Hill, of Spencer, and has four children: 

Angle P., born September 8, 1869, married in North Brook- 
field to George Jones, May 14, 1892. 



198 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Etta M., born November 29, 1871, married May 29, 1893, to 
Charles Paquin, Jr. Mr. Paquin gave up his business in Oak- 
ham in 1898, was a student at McGill Veterinary College in 
1898-99, and during the following year at Ontario Veterinary 
College, where he was graduated as Veterinary Surgeon in 1900. 
In 191 1 he was appointed Veterinary Inspector for Worcester 
County and a part of Middlesex County, having under his care 
eighty towns and cities. 

Mary E., born March 21, 1874, was married in 1895, in 
Chatham, N. Y., to Winthrop H. Boyd, and has one daughter, 
Leone, born in Oakham, July 10, 1896. 

Henry W., born May 14, 1880, was married in North Brook- 
field, June 2, 1906, to Ellen G. Hall, and has one son, George 
Fred Washington, born April 22, 1907. Henry W. Stone com- 
menced playing the cornet in the Oakham Band when a boy of 
about twelve years. Three years later he joined Reeves' Band 
of Providence, with which he was connected two years. After 
three years' study under Mr. Pellett of Worcester, he joined the 
Worcester Brass Band, Frank W. Chaffin, Leader, and holds first 
chair at the present time. 



William I. Temple. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 
Discharged, July 22, 1862. 

Born March 25, 1838, at Princeton, Mass. His father was Willard 
Temple, who married Dolly H. Smith in Princeton, November 22, 1837. 
After her husband's death, Mrs. Temple married Samuel Maynard of 
Oakham, April 21, 1853, and her four children, William, Mary Ann, 
Jane, and Dolly, came with her to Oakham. 

William I. Temple was a young man of excellent ability. He 
wrote creditable poetry, was a good debater, and was one of the 
presidents of the Franklin Literary Society. He was also inven- 
tive, and took out a patent from the United States Patent Office. 

He enlisted in the 25th regiment at the age of twenty-three: 
stature 5 feet 75^, complexion dark, eyes dark blue, hair black, 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 199 

by occupation a bookkeeper. He was appointed Sergeant 
October 15. 

Temple spoke his mind fearlessly, but calmly. In January, 
1862, Company H got up a petition which was signed by seventy- 
two men, to have the cook turned out of the kitchen. Sergeants 
Temple and Gleason presented the paper to the Captain, who 
was offended that the Sergeants should approve such a petition. 
Temple said to him : "If the Sergeants are not to be allowed to 
take an interest in the welfare of the men, then please take off 
my stripes." 

A diary kept by Temple has been preserved, covering the 
period from the time of his enlistment till Sunday, April 6, 1862. 
The records in this little book plainly show that he had been 
anxious about his health some months before his enlistment, and 
that he hoped the out-of-door life would help him to regain his 
strength ; but he found the service too severe. The long marches 
and hard drill increased his unfavorable symptoms, and he was 
discharged after ten months' service, on a surgeon's certificate 
of disability. 

After leaving the army, he was for a short time traveling 
companion for John B. Gough on his lecture tours, looking after 
the advertising in newspapers and by posters, the printing and 
selling of tickets, traveling expenses, hack service, hotel bills, and 
rent of halls. 

William Temple died of pulmonary tuberculosis in Oakham, 
January 14, 1871. 

Henry Hazen Ware. 

Mustered in, September 24, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 19, 1864. 

Died in the service. 

Born August 20, 1841, in Oakham, son of James B. and Betsy (Capen) 
Ware. His father, born May i, 1803, was son of Archibald and Lavinia 
Ware, who were married December 17, 1/88. James B. Ware was a 
manufacturer of plow handles, and owned the farm which now belongs 
to John E. Stone. He was a good citizen, a man of fine presence, and 
held many offices, having been chosen eight times as Selectman and twice 
representing the town in the Massachusetts Legislature. 



200 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Henry H. Ware, a machinist, enlisted at the age of twenty. 
He was wounded February 8, 1862, in the battle of Roanoke 
Island, but soon returned to the regiment. He was killed May 
16, 1864, in the disastrous battle of Drury's Bluff. 

Jonathan Gibbs Warren. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Mustered out, July 13, 1865. 
Address, West Brookfield, Mass. 

Born in Oakham, November 22, 1842, son of Eber H. and Miriam 
(Gibbs) Warren. His father, Eber Warren, came to Oakham from Rut- 
land and lived in a house not now standing, on the east side of the 
Coldbrook road and north of the house of Dr. Charles Adams. 

Jonathan G. Warren, by occupation a farmer, enlisted at the 
age of nineteen and was appointed Corporal. He was wounded at 
Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864, but returned to duty and continued 
in the service till the close of the war. 

He removed from Oakham to West Brookfield about 1878, 
where he was for several years in the meat business and later a 
news dealer. He has served the town of West Brookfield as 
Constable, as Truant Officer, and as a member of the School 
Committee, and was for many years Commander of the Alanson 
Hamilton Post, G. A. R. 

Joseph D. Whitney. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1861. 

Discharged, May 11, 1863. 
Reenlisted, September 23, 1864. 
Mustered out, August 12, 1865. 

Born at Watertown, Mass., in 1833, son of Alpheus and Abigail 
Whitney. 

Joseph D. Whitney enlisted from Oakham at the age of 
twenty-eight, by occupation a shoemaker. After his discharge 
from the 25th regiment on account of disability, he recovered 



TPIE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 201 

his health and reenlisted in Co. C, 13th Conn. Inf., and con- 
tinued in the service till the close of the war. 

After his return from the army, he worked at his trade in 
Oakham for several years, and was subsequently in the employ 
of John C. Bigelow of Paxton. 

He was married to Saphronia Bemis of Paxton, September 
22, 1875, and had one son, George H. Whitney, born December 
19, 1881, now the village blacksmith of Paxton. 

Joseph D. Whitney died in Paxton, March 11, 1909. 



Edwin Wilbur. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 

Reenlisted, January 18, 1864. 

Discharged, June 17, 1865. 

Address, West Brookfield, Mass. 

Born November 2, 1840, in Oakham, youngest son of Horace and Eliza 
(Hagar) Wilbur, and, on his mother's side, a descendant in the fourth 
generation of Col. Isaac Hagar who married Anna, daughter of Capt. 
Jonathan Bullard, April 26, 1770. 

Edwin Wilbur was a shoemaker working with his father when 
he enlisted, at the age of twenty. He was wounded May 6, 
1864, at Port Walthal Junction, Va., and was, for some months, 
in the hospitals at Fortress Monroe and Portsmouth, Va., but 
returned to the army at Petersburg. In September, 1864, he 
was sent to Newbern, N. C, where he contracted yellow fever 
and was in the hospital in January, 1865. On February 25, he 
was sent north to Dale Hospital at Worcester, Mass., from 
which he was discharged June 17, 1865. 

After the war he lived in Barre in 1866, in North Brookfield 
1867-70, and in Brookfield till 1872, when he located permanently 
in West Brookfield, where he was for twenty-five years engaged 
in the meat business, for two years conductor on the Warren, 
Brookfield & Spencer Street Railway, and later janitor of public 
buildings. He has been Meat Inspector, Sealer of Weights and 
Measures, Chairman of the Cemetery Commission, and in 1885 



20 2 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

was elected Representative of the District in the General Court, 
and served on the Committee on Election L3,ws. For several 
years he was Commander of the Alanson Hamilton Post, G. A. R. 

May 29, 1872, he was married at Brookfield, to Mary Eliza- 
beth Duell, daughter of Judge George S. and Elizabeth (Hallo- 
well) Duell. Mrs. Wilbur was born June 25, 1845, at West 
Brookfield. Children, all born in West Brookfield: Charlotte 
Elizabeth, March 31, 1873; Lucy Edna, September 20, 1874; 
Grace Duell, March 11, 1876; Lora Belle, February 4, 1878; 
George Edwin, August 15, 1879, died May 10, 1880; Ruth 
Agnes, November 11, 1888, died November 19, 1888. 

Charlotte Elizabeth was married to Eugene Alonzo Gilbert, of 
West Brookfield, June 21, 1899, and has two children: Nathalie 
Wilbur, born July 6, 1900; Alonzo Edwin, born February 20, 
1903. 

Lora Belle was married to Lewis Herman Bruce, October 7, 
1903, and has a daughter, Dorothy Wilbur, born May o.'j, 1904. 



George Paige Wood. 

Mustered in, September 17, 1861. 
Died in the service. 

Born in West Brookfield, July 6, 1837. His father was George Wood, 
born in Bethel, Vt, November 14, 1808, son of Thomas and Betsy (Crow- 
ell) Wood. His mother was Abigail EHzabeth Keep, daughter of Josiah 
and Lucy (Tucker) Keep, who were married October 27, 1801. George 
Wood, of Bethel, Vt., and Abigail E. Keep, of Monson, were married 
March 4 1832. Mr. Wood died in West Brookfield, September 8, 1840. 
After his death, Mrs. Wood married Hervey Maynard, March 28, 1844, 
and came with her two sons to Oakham. 

George P. Wood enlisted at the age of twenty-four, by occu- 
pation a farmer, and died of disease, September 19, 1862, at 
Newbern. 

February 18, 1858, he was married to Sarah S. Merrifield, 
daughter of James A. Merrifield, and had two sons, Elmer B., 
born June 22, 1859, ^^d George Arthur, born August 26, 1861. 




CORPORAL LAWSON DWIGHT WOOD 
25th Mass. Infantry 




GEORGE PAIGE WOOD 
25th Mass. Infantry 




LYMAN N. PARKER 
2sth Mass. Infantry 



n 




WILLARD A. KKINK 
2Sth Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 203 

Lawson Dwight Wood. 

Mustered in, September 16, 1861. 
Died in the service. 

Bom in West Brookfield, August 23, 1839, son of George and Abigail 
Elizabeth (Keep) Wood, and brother of George Paige Wood. 

Lawson Dwight Wood, when quite young, left home and lived 
in the family of Joseph Fobes. He was a young man of marked 
ability and had been a teacher in the public schools of Oakham. 
When the Civil War began he was a student at Williston 
Seminary. 

He left Williston and enlisted at the age of twenty-two, and 
was appointed Corporal. He died November 23, 1862, at New- 
bern, N. C. 

Sergeant Henry Arthur White of Co. H, whose mother was 
an Oakham girl, writes : 

"I well remember the two Wood brothers from Oakham. Thej'^ were 
my tent-mates from the start at Worcester till their death, which came in 
1862, — two worthy men, an honor to themselves and to their town, of 
fine personal character, good soldiers both, both tall men, standing among 
the first ten men of Co. H. They were unable to stand the debility of 
that first hard summer. We were sorry to lose them," 

Nathaniel H. Foster. 

Mustered in, October 12, 1861. 

Resigned as Lieutenant, January i, 1863. 

Appointed Major, July 21, 1864. 

Mustered out, April 29, 1866. 

Born in Rutland, December 17, 1832, son of James R. and Nancy 
(Henry) Foster, brother of Albert H. Foster, Co. F, 15th Mass., and 
cousin of John W. Gould of the 25th Mass. and Edwin S. Gould of the 
51st Mass. 

Nathaniel H. Foster went to North Brookfield when sixteen 
years of age, and, with the exception of five years (1861-66) 
when in the army, he was in the employ of the Batchellers till 
1893. He served the town of North Brookfield at various times 



204 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

as Cemetery Commissioner, Tree Warden, Tax Collector, and 
Trustee of the Public Library. 

He enlisted September i6, 1861, for three years, in Co. H, 
25th Mass.; was commissioned Second Lieutenant, October 12, 
1861 ; wounded at Roanoke Island, February 8, 1862; promoted 
to First Lieutenant, June 13, 1862; in battles of Kinston, White 
Hall, and Goldsboro, December, 1862; resigned, January i, 1863; 
appointed Major in 12th U. S. Heavy Artillery, Colored Troops, 
to date July 21, 1864; and continued in the service till 1866. 

He was married (i) January 17, 1855, to Mary E. Draper 
of Spencer, who was born March i, 1833, and died in North 
Brookfield, July 10, 1868; (2) to Mary A. Webster of North 
Brookfield, November 22, 1870. Children: Mary Lucia, born 
October 23, 1855, died September 5, 1882; Addie Lione, born 
November 22, 1859, married June 12, 1888, to Albert W. Poland, 
died January 25, 1891. 

Major Nathaniel H. Foster died in North Brookfield, August 
6, 1909. 

Willard A. Frink. 

Mustered in, January 5, 1864. 
Died in the service. 

Son of William S. Frink, born in North Brookfield, July 14, 1836, and 
lived several years in Oakham. He was a descendant, through Dr. John 
Frink of Rutland, of Rev. Thomas Frink, who was graduated from 
Harvard College in 1722, and settled over the Rutland church in 1727. 

He enlisted in Co. H, 25th Mass., for the town of Spencer, 
about a year and a half before the close of the war, and was 
never heard from after the battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. 
Whether he was killed in the battle or died of wounds in a Con- 
federate hospital, is not known. 

He was married in Oakham, June 26, i860, to Sophronia 
Abiah Town, daughter of Daniel and Sophronia (Raymond) 
Town, and had two children : Hiram Everett, born in Oakham, 
May 19, 1861, married to Delia Stone of Spencer; Lillie Belle, 
born in Oakham, September 14, 1864, married November 4, 
1882, to George W. Pratt of Spencer. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 25TH MASS. INFANTRY 205 

LeRoy D. Noyes. 

Mustered in, April i, 1862. 
Discharged, November ig, 1863. 

Born September 16, 1839, in Oakham, son of Daniel and Caroline A. 
(Lilley) Noyes, and grandson of Luther and Azuba (Smith) Noyes. 

LeRoy D. Noyes enlisted in Co. H of the 25th Mass. for the 
city of Worcester and after serving a year and a half was dis- 
charged for disability. 

He was married (i) to Clementin L. Arnold in 1863; (2) 
to Emma L. Thompson in 1883. Children : Charles, born Janu- 
ary 21, 1884; Robert D., born August 11, 1886, died October 14, 
1888; LeRoy D., born August 11, 1886; Frank W., born August 
20, 1889; Caroline L. P., born December 16, 1893. 

LeRoy D. Noyes died November 17, 1909, at West Boylston, 
Mass. 

31st Mass. Infantry. 

John Macomber. 

Mustered in, November 17, 1861. 

Reenlisted, February 14, 1864. 
Mustered out, September 9, 1865. 

Born May 30, 1834, in Oakham, son of John J. and Abigail (Packard) 
Macomber. 

John Macomber was a carpenter and enlisted for the town 
of Oakham at the age of twenty-seven, in Co. G, 31st Mass. 
The 31st regiment left the state, February 21, 1862, joined the 
Department of the Gulf, took part in the operations against 
New Orleans, and was the first regiment to enter the city after 
the surrender. It took up its position before Port Hudson, May 
23, sharing in the engagements of May 25, May 27, and June 
14. Many of the regiment reenlisted during the winter of 
1863-64. 

After returning from the war, Mr. Macomber followed the 
trade of carpenter in North Brookfield. He was married to 



2o6 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Harriet Doane of North Brookfield, September 25, 1856., by 
whom he had two children: NeHie, born in Oakham, July 23, 
1857; George, born in Oakham, December 19, 1861. 

Mrs. Macomber died in Paxton, July 25, 1875, and he was 
again married to Ella Forhay, of East Brookfield, November 9, 
1878. Children : George Garfield, born June 28, 1880, in North 
Brookfield; James and John, born February 12, 1882, in North 
Brookfield; A. Josephine, born March 6, 1883, in Worcester, 

Mr. Macomber died in East Brookfield, November 5, 1882. 

34th Mass. Infantry. 

The 34th regiment, recruited at Worcester, left the state 
August 15, reached Alexandria, August 22, and remained sta- 
tioned in the vicinity on picket until July, 1863. In December 
it moved up the Shenandoah Valley, and remained on provost 
and outpost duty at Harper's Ferry till May 2, 1864. The regi- 
ment took part in the movements in the Shenandoah, engaging 
with loss at the battle of New Market on May 15, Piedmont on 
June 5, Lynchburg on June 18. Returning to Martinsburg, July 
II, 1864, it met the enemy at Snicker's Gap, July 18, and at 
Winchester on the 24th, was in action in the battles of Opequon 
and Fisher's Hill, and was at Cedar Creek on October 19. It 
shared in the final operations about Petersburg, engaging at 
Hatcher's Run, March 31, and at the final assault on the works. 
It followed Lee to Appomattox, encamping, after the surrender, 
at Lynchburg, entered Richmond, April 25, and remained there 
in camp until the expiration of its service. 

George B. Macomber. 

Mustered in, August 11, 1862. 
Mustered out, January 20, 1866. 

Born December 20, 1838, in Oakham. His father, John J. Macomber, 
was born in Oakham, November 11, 1797, son of John Macomber who 
came to Oakham before February 11, 1795. His mother was Abigail 
Fobes, daughter of Jonathan and Susan Crawford Packard. Mrs. 
Macomber's father was descended from Ichabod Packard, a soldier in 
the French and Indian wars and in the Revolution, who came to Oakham 




MAJOR GEORGE K. MACOMJJEK 
34th Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR 34TH MASS. INFANTRY 207 

from teridgewater in 1770. Her mother was Susan Crawford, daughter 
of Alexander and Bethiah (Willis) Crawford, and granddaughter of 
Capt. John Crawford of the Revolutionary Army. John J. Macomber, the 
father of George, had thirteen children, five of whom (John, George, 
James, Henry, and William) served as soldiers in the Civil War. Abigail, 
their only daughter, was the wife of William R. Barr of the Mass. 34th. 
Edwin was graduated at Yale College in 1863. Luther went in early life 
to the Sandwich Islands, where he had a plantation ; he had nine children, 
one of whom served in the U. S. Army in Porto Rico in the war with 
Spain. 

George B. Macomber was prepared for college at Monson 
Academy and was graduated from Amherst with the Class of 
1862. Immediately after graduation he enlisted in the 34th 
Mass. At the organization of the regiment, July 31, 1862, he 
was appointed First Lieutenant; October 14, 1864, he was pro- 
moted to Captain. March 13, 1865, he was made Major U, S. 
Volunteers, by brevet, "for gallant and meritorious services 
during the war." In June, 1865, he was transferred to the 24th 
Mass. After the surrender of Lee, this regiment, with others 
whose time had not expired, was on provost duty in Richmond, 
under command of George B. Macomber, Acting Colonel, and 
remained in the service till January, 1866. 

After the war, he decided to enter the regular army. May 11, 

1866, he was appointed Second Lieutenant, 14th Inf., U. S. A.; 
September 21, 1866, transferred to the 32d Inf.; January 14, 

1867, promoted to First Lieutenant; April 19, 1869, transferred 
to 2ist Inf. 

He died in Arizona, September 19, 1869, from injuries caused 
by the breaking of a derrick, while he was superintending the 
weighing of hay. 

He was married at Washington, D. C, June 28, 1866, to Kate, 
daughter of Col. Goodwin of Fairfax, Va., and had two children. 

William Robinson Barr. 

Mustered in, December 10, 1863. 
Mustered out, January 20, 1866. 

Born May 22, 1832, in Hardwick, Mass. His father. Captain Sumner 
Barr, was son of John Barr, Jr., and Molly (Bridges) Barr; his mother. 



2o8 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Susan B. Robinson, was daughter of William Robinson and granddaughter 
of John Robinson (born April 24, 1759) who came from Northboro to 
Oakham in 1790. 

William R. Barr was a member of Crawford's Cornet Band, 
and enlisted in December, 1863, as a musician in the 34th Mass. 
January 14, 1865, he was transferred to the 24th U. S. Inf., and 
after the surrender of Lee was with his regiment on provost duty 
in Richmond till June, 1866. After the war, Mr. Barr lived in 
Oakham, Spencer, Rutland, and Worcester. 

November 28, 1856, he was married to Abigail, daughter of 
John J. and Abigail (Packard) Macomber, and had three chil- 
dren: Henry G., born November 28, 1857, now a successful 
manufacturer of machinists' tools in Worcester ; Mary Josephine, 
born February 21, 1863, died January 6, 1896; Addison William, 
born February 10, 1868, now a printer in Worcester. 

William Robinson Barr died in Worcester, November 23, 1906. 

Horace Marvin Green. 

Mustered in, July 13, 1862. 

Mustered out, June 16, 1865. 

Address, Coldbrook Springs, Mass. 

Born June 17, 1846, in Oakham, son of Joel and Mary (Goodwin) 
Green. His father, Joel Green, born June 26, 1820, in Rutland, was the 
son of Elijah and Lucretia (Roper) Green, who were married January 28, 
1800. Mary Goodwin Green was born November 23, 1815, in Guilford, 
Vt. The other children of Joel and Mary Green, all born in Oakham, 
were: Lewis Putnam, May 21, 1848; Ella Louisa, December 21, 1851 ; 
Edwin, April 8, 1854. 

Horace M. Green enlisted at the age of sixteen, in Co. H, 
34th Mass., and served till the end of the war. He was in the 
battles of New Market, Piedmont, Lynchburg, Snicker's Gap, 
Winchester July 24, and September 19, 1864, Martinsburg, 
Berryville and Fisher's Hill. 

Since his return he has lived in Coldbrook, and followed the 
occupation of farmer, in which he was brought up. 

He was married, May 25, 1870, to Adeline Perkins, daughter 
of Horatio Perkins. Mr, Perkins came to Oakham from Hop- 



THE CIVIL WAR — 34TH MASS. INFANTRY 209 

kinton, Mass., and married Anna P. Gibbs, daughter of Jonathan 
Gibbs, May 4, 1845. 

Mr. and Mrs. Green have had nine children, all born in Oak- 
ham: M. Eugene, February 24, 1872, married (i) Minnie Davis 
of Worcester, (2) Emily Rowe of Worcester; Anna, November 
6, 1874; Florence M., May 3, 1876; Josie, June 15, 1878; Ella 
D., November 3, 1880, married Charles H. Adams of Worcester; 
Nellie, November 18, 1882; Mary, April i, 1885; Evander H., 
April 6, 1888, married Mamie Haley of Ware; Harry W., May 
18, 1892. 

James Shearn. 

Mustered in, July 17, 1862. 

Discharged, June 17, 1865. 

Address, North Brookfield, Mass. 

Born in the town of Killmorgan and County of Sligo in Ireland in 
May, 1844, son of John and Ann (Hart) Shearn; he came to America 
in June, 1859, 

James Shearn was a bootmaker by occupation, and enlisted 
from the town of Spencer in Co. E, 34th Mass. He was in 
the battles of New Market, Cedar Creek, Winchester, and 
Fisher's Hill. For three days he was under fire at the extreme 
left of Petersburg, and was in the charge in which Fort Gregg 
was taken. He was wounded: (i) at New Market, May 15, 
1864; (2) in the charge on Fort Gregg, April 2, 1865. He 
was discharged by order of the War Department. 

After returning from the war, he was married to Mary Glynn 
at Barre, July 23, 1865. In 1875 he removed to Oakham and 
purchased the Samuel Maynard farm, on which he lived till the 
spring of 1913. 

He has had seven children, only three of whom are now living: 
M. Lizzie, born in Spencer, May 3, 1866, died in North Brook- 
field, September 3, 1892; Katie D., born in Hubbardston, March 
10, 1868; John F., born in Hubbardston, April 26, 1871 ; Ella 
L., born in Hubbardston, December 9, 1873, died in Oakham, 
November 27, 1903; James J., born in Oakham, June 2, 1878, 
died in Oakham, September 18, 1884; Henry T., born in Oak- 

14 



2IO SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

ham, March 28, 1883, died in Oakham, October i, 1884; Jennie 
A., born in Oakham, June 24, 1885. 

John Shearn is in the clothing business in Providence, and 
has a store at 479 Westminster Street. 

36th Mass. Infantry. 

Fifteen Oakham men enlisted in Co. K, of the 36th regiment. 
This regiment was organized in the summer of 1862 at Camp 
Wool, Worcester, and was recruited mostly in the eastern and 
western towns of Worcester County. It left the state for 
Washington, September 2, joined the 9th Army Corps near 
Sharpsburg, Md., September 21, and was present at the Battle 
of Fredericksburg. Early in 1863, it joined General Burnside 
in the Department of the Ohio, and formed part of the forces 
sent to Vicksburg in June. It returned to Kentucky, was active 
at Blue Springs, October 10, was closely engaged at Campbell's 
Station, November 16, where Lieutenant Fairbank and Miles 
Reed were wounded, and was on duty during the siege of Knox- 
ville. Returning to Annapolis, Md., in April, 1864, it was 
engaged with loss at the Wilderness on May 6, where Sergeant 
Howell was wounded. The regiment suffered greatly in the 
charge at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12; here Sergeant 
Chamberlain was wounded. In the action of the right wing at 
Cold Harbor, June 2, the regiment lost fifty-seven men in killed 
and wounded. Among the wounded was Corporal Henry 
Macomber, The regiment shared in the assault on Petersburg, 
June 17, and engaged in the operations on the Weldon Railroad 
in August. In the final assault on Petersburg, April 2, 1865, 
Charles Haskell was killed. After the fall of Petersburg, the 
regiment moved to Farmville and served on provost duty. 

John Barnard Fairbank. 

Mustered in, August 27, 1862. 
Mustered out, June 8, 1865. 

Bom August 8, 1839. His father, James Chandler Fairbank, was son 
of Ephraim Fairbank, who came from New Ipswich, N. H., to Oakham 
about 181 5. His mother was Lurana (Robinson) Fairbank, daughter of 




MAJOR JOHN I'.ARNAKD FAIRBANK 
36th Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 211 

John Robinson, a Revolutionary soldier, who came from Northboro to 
Oakham in 1790 and settled on the farm now owned by his descendant, 
George W. Stone. 

John B. Fairbank was from boyhood a fine scholar and an 
excellent writer and debater. When the Franklin Literary 
Society was organized, he was chosen its first President. Begin- 
ning in the fall of 1856, he pursued his studies at Monson Acad- 
emy, teaching in the pubHc schools of Oakham each winter, and 
entered Middlebury College in September, i860. A year later 
he left Middlebury and entered Amherst. 

In 1862, at the end of Sophomore year, he left college to enlist 
in the 36th Mass. At the organization of the regiment, August 
II, 1862, he was made First Sergeant of Co. K. His ability 
soon attracted the attention of Colonel Bowman, who often said, 
"Fairbank is the best Orderly Sergeant in the regiment, and 
Co. K owes its efficiency more to him than to any other man" ; 
but for nearly nine months he failed to receive the advancement 
which he deserved. May 2, 1863, he was promoted to Second 
Lieutenant; October 23, 1863, to First Lieutenant; May 13, 
1864, to Captain. 

In the engagement at Blue Springs, October 10, 1863, the 
regiment, following the retreating enemy, came to the crest of 
a hill and discovered a Confederate battery five or six hundred 
yards in front. Colonel Goodale had just given orders to fall 
back under the shelter of the hill, when a shell from the battery 
burst, wounding Colonel Goodale and breaking Lieutenant Fair- 
bank's sword into three pieces, but leaving him uninjured. As 
he picked up the pieces of the broken sword, a member of the 
company, perhaps thinking of the time when "They shall beat 
their swords into plowshares," said to him: "They have broken 
your sword into door-scrapers." 

He was wounded in the battle at Campbell's Station, Novem- 
ber 16, 1863. In this engagement he wore the sword of Captain 
W. H. Hodgkins, who after the Vicksburg campaign had been 
sent to Massachusetts to bring back recruits. When Lieutenant 
Fairbank was taken from the field, this sword was left behind, 
the Confederates pressing so close that it was impossible to 



212 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

go back and recover it. Mr. W. B. T witty of Spartansburg, 
S. C, found the sword on the field after the battle, and has 
recently returned it to Captain Hodgkins, whose name was on 
the hilt. 

Fairbank was in the Asylum Hospital at Knoxville ninety days, 
and not until several weeks after he was wounded were his 
family able to hear from him, as Knoxville was then besieged 
by General Longstreet. On his release from the hospital he went 
home for a short furlough, at the end of which he rejoined 
his regiment. 

He distinguished himself in the assault on the redoubt at 
Petersburg, June i8, 1864. This was the most brilliant and 
successful engagement in which the 36th regiment ever had a 
part. The regiment had less than ninety men in the battle, and 
of these three were killed and sixteen wounded, three of them 
mortally. It was here that Sergeant Macomber seized the colors 
and bore them through the engagement, after the color bearer 
of the regiment had been wounded. Captain Hodgkins, in his 
description of the battle, said: "As the rebel commander was 
pulled over the breastworks as a prisoner, he shouted to his 
men: 'Stand firm; their right is all gone.' The enemy dis- 
covered the break in our line and commenced a sharp cross-fire 
upon the regiment. At this critical moment, Captain Smith, 
commanding the regiment, with wonderful presence of mind, 
turned toward the left and shouted at the top of his voice, 'Fair- 
bank, bring up your brigade !' at the same moment yelling, 
'Charge!' The ruse had its desired effect, and before Lieutenant 
Fairbank could hurry his 'brigade' of eight men of Co. K 
from the left, the enemy wavered. Our men leaped the breast- 
works and captured all the defenders who did not take to their 
heels."* May 13, 1865, Fairbank was brevetted Major United 
States Volunteers, "for gallant and meritorious services in the 
assault on the enemy's lines near Petersburg, Va." On October 
13, 1864, Fairbank wrote home: "Of the thirteen hundred men 
that we have had on our rolls, only four hundred and eighty are 
left, and of these only one hundred and sixty are fit for duty. Of 

* History of the 36th Regiment, M.V.M., pp. 206-207. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 213 

the eight officers that composed my mess, every one has been 
killed or wounded, and all the wounded severely, except myself." 
November i, 1864, he was assigned to command of Co. E. He 
was the Senior Captain in the regiment, and during a portion of 
the months of October, 1864, and January, 1865, he was in 
command of the regiment in the absence of Lieutenant Colonel 
Barker. While in camp near Petersburg he served on Court 
Martial from the middle of November, 1864, to the middle o£ 
February, 1865. 

After the war. Major Fairbank continued his studies, was 
graduated as Bachelor of Arts from Amherst College in 1867, 
and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws from Columbia 
Law School in 1869. He began legal practice in Winfield, 
Kansas, where he was appointed Deputy States Attorney for 
Cowley County. In 1875 he was called back to Massachusetts 
by his father's infirmities and age, and during the next six years 
resided in Oakham. Here he was honored by his fellow towns- 
men with the highest offices in their gift. He was Selectman, 
member of the School Committee, and twice represented the 
district in the Massachusetts Legislature. He wrote the history 
of Oakham for A. P. Marvin's "History of Worcester County," 
and was the founder of the Oakham Soldiers' Union. 

In 1 88 1 he went to the Black Hills, South Dakota, and located 
for a time in Deadwood, but soon removed to Portland, where 
he resided till his death. Here he practiced as a lawyer and 
dealt in mining properties. He took special interest in the local 
schools and in the Grand Army. In 1896 he was chosen Senator 
in the South Dakota Legislature, and was a prominent member 
of that body. He was President of the School Board in Port- 
land, and was nominated by his party for a position on the bench 
of the Supreme Court of the State, but was not elected. 

He died in Portland, S. D., April 29, 1908, and was buried in 
Mount Moriah Cemetery. He was far from home and relatives, 
but school children attended his funeral in great numbers, and 
the church in which the exercises were held was filled with his 
friends. The Bar Association of Lawrence County, S. D., gave 
this testimony to his worth: 



214 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

"The excellent qualities of his life, the charm of his character, his devo- 
tion to his country, and his disinterested labors of love and mercy, will 
long linger as an inspiration to brighter hopes, more laudable endeavor, 
and purer and higher purposes." 

The Deadwood Pioneer Times referred feelingly to his many 
excellent qualities in its issue of May 2, 1908: 

"He was a polished and scholarly gentleman, whose friendship was 
an honor and whose company a pleasure. The studies which he fol- 
lowed in his youth, he loved in his declining years, and his mind was 
stored with a wealth of interesting information on varied subjects. Those 
who knew him loved him for his manly qualities, his refinement and 
accomplishments. He was a man of learning and culture, a lover of 
literature, and an admirer of everything good and noble, a man who 
went among his fellows with a word of hope, comfort and encourage- 
ment, a welcome visitor wherever he went." 

James A. George, a Confederate veteran, wrote: 

"In public and private life he was ever the courteous and polished 
gentleman, so pleasant to meet. I never heard him say an unkind word 
about or to any person. He wore the blue and I wore the gray. Often 
in private and at soldiers' and sailors' reunions we have met and fought 
over the battles again, but never a harsh word was spoken. Far from 
his old home, old comrades have laid him to rest. Sleep on, kind and 
generous soul. May a loving Father comfort those aching hearts far 
from your resting place." 

Edward Chamberlain. 

Mustered in, August 4, 1862. 
Mustered out, June 4, 1865. 

Born in Holden, Mass., August 10, 1842, twin brother of Edwin Cham- 
berlain. His father, Thomas J. Chamberlain, a son of Jacob Chamberlain 
and Ruth Upton, came to Oakham from Holden in 1856. His mother 
was Lydia B. (Wright) Chamberlain, daughter of James Wright of 
Marlboro. 

Edward Chamberlain enlisted as a private at the age of 
twenty, in Co. K, was appointed Corporal, and promoted to 
Sergeant. He was wounded at Spottsylvania, May 11, 1864. 
After his return to the regiment, he was made Orderly Sergeant, 
October 12, 1864, and on November 13 was appointed Second 



THE CIVIL WAR — 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 215 

Lieutenant. He was a brave soldier and a capable and trust- 
worthy officer. 

Lieutenant Chamberlain returned from the war somewhat 
broken in health. He was in the employ of Moses O. Ayres for 
a year, and afterward worked with his brother in the shoe shop 
at Ware Corner. 

He died in Oakham, May 17, 1870. 



Charles L. Haskell. 

Mustered in, July 12, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born November 9, 1819, in Athol, Mass., son of Loring and Sally 
(Lincoln) Haskell. His grandfather, Simeon Haskell, a farmer and 
blacksmith, was born in Middleboro, January 10, 1767, son of Roger and 
Judith Haskell. He removed to North Brookfield about 1793, came 
from North Brookfield to Oakham in 1804, and lived on the Belknap 
place. He was a prominent citizen, having been five times Selectman. 
He died March 25, 1847, at the age of eighty years. Charles Haskell's 
mother, Sally Lincoln, was daughter of Stephen Lincoln, a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War. 

Charles L. Haskell bought of Deacon Andrew Spooner the 
farm which was purchased from Deacon Jesse Allen by Eleazer 
Spooner in 1776, and on which the Spooner family had lived 
till the buildings were burned in 1848. Here Mr. Haskell built 
the house lately owned by Mr. John P. Day. He was one of 
the leaders in the Congregational Church and one of the most 
helpful supporters of the social and religious meetings. 

When forty-two years of age he enlisted in Co. K of the 36th 
Mass., and endured well all the hard campaigns up to the week 
in which Lee surrendered at Appomattox, but lost his life on 
the day of the final assault on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. He 
had been sent to the rear with Confederate prisoners, and was 
returning to the front when he was shot through the breast and 
instantly killed. 

Mr. Peloubet thus characterized him: "A faithful, true, 
upright Christian man, well read in Bible history, not excelling 



2X6 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

in soldiery tactics, but always sterling in soldierly action, uni- 
versally respected, and always at the post of duty," 



Silas Jacob Howell. 

Mustered in, August 5, 1862. 
Discharged, June 22, 1865. 

Born in Malone, N. Y., in 1838. 

In the summer of 1862 he was living in Coldbrook, and was 
in the employ of Parker & Whiting as master mechanic in the 
plow shop, when, at the age of twenty-three, he enlisted in 
the 36th regiment. While in camp at Worcester he was 
appointed Sergeant of Company K. He was wounded in the 
Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, but soon returned to duty 
and was with the regiment till the end of the war. He was dis- 
charged by the order of the War Department, on account of 
disability from wounds, a few days before the regiment was 
mustered out. 

After returning home, he lived in Orange, Mass., and was for , 
more than fifteen years in the employ of the New Home Sewing 
Machine Company. He was a very fine mechanic. When he 
needed a machine or tool, he made it, and made it well. When 
he had made it, he seemed satisfied, and never put forth any 
effort to turn his invention into money. He devised and made 
the first machine to turn out the hemmers on the New Home 
sewing machine, and also invented a glass cutter, which had a 
very extensive sale. 

In 1882 he left the employ of the Sewing Machine Company 
and removed to Boston, where for ten years he had a large 
machine shop. This he sold only when failing health compelled 
him to give it up. He returned to Orange in 1892 and established 
a jeweler's store at 13 South Main Street, and was a skillful 
repairer of clocks and watches. In 1899, on the death of his 
son Adelbert, he removed to Dorchester, where he died in 1905. 

He was married in 1859 to Amelia Elizabeth Keating, who 
was born in Charlottetown, P. E. I., in 1842. Children: Francis 



THE CIVIL WAR — 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 21 7 

Jacob, born i860, married Eva Dell Mason, lives in Stoneham, 
Mass.; Laura Jeanette, born 1862, died in Dorchester, March 
30, 1912; Charles Leander, born 1866, married (i) Louisa 
Rheinhaltina Helmboldt, (2) Henrietta Helmboldt, and lives in 
Dorchester; Katherine Mary, born 1870, lives in Dorchester; 
Amelia Elizabeth, born 1872, died 1877; Frederick Silas, born 
1874, married Katherine Vaughan, lives in Warner, N. H. ; 
Adelbert, born 1877, died 1899; Grace Elizabeth, born 1880, 
lives in Dorchester. 

James Dexter Johnson. 

Mustered in, August 12, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 12, 1865. 

Born in Newark, Vt., November 17, 1833, son of Calvin and Tabitha 
(Dexter) Johnson. His mother was daughter of James Dexter, who 
is said to have gone to Vermont from Connecticut. 

James D. Johnson was a carpenter by trade and worked in 
Worcester and the surrounding towns for a few years before 
the war. At the time of his enlistment he was employed as 
a foreman in the shop of Parker & Whiting in Coldbrook, 
engaged in the manufacture of agricultural implements. He 
was transferred July 7, 1863, to Co. C of the 3d regiment, U. S. 
Veteran Reserve Corps. In this Company he was First Sergeant. 
He was discharged from the service at the close of the war, 
at Augusta, Me. 

After the war, he returned for a time to the town of Newark, 
Vt., and purchased a farm. Later he removed to West Burke, 
Vt., where he purchased another farm, and in company with 
another man purchased a saw and grist mill. It was in this mill 
that he met with an accident on the board saw, on April 26, 1878, 
which resulted in his death on the following day. 

October 20, 1858, he was married to Emeline Augusta Wright, 
sister of George C. Wright, the well-known coffee and spice 
manufacturer of Boston (Dwinnell, Wright Co.). Children: 
Carrie Augusta Flint, born September 18, i860, now of Clinton, 
Mass.; Fred Dexter, born April 9, 1863, now of Worcester, 



2l8 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Mass.; Jennie Ella Swallow, born February i, 1867, now living 
at Exeter, N. H. ; Edson Bert, born November 6, 1871 ; Ada 
Alida, born July 28, 1873, deceased; Alma lola Cunningham, 
born July 26, 1876, deceased. 

Edson Bert Johnson is a counsellor at law, with offices in 
Worcester and Barre; residence at 18 Oread Street, Worcester. 

Mrs. Johnson is still living, and is in very good health, though 
seventy-nine years of age. 



Henry 1. Macomber. 

Mustered in, August 2, 1862. 
Mustered out, June 8, 1865, 

Bom in Oakham, December 5, 1845, son of John J. and Abigail (Pack- 
ard) Macomber, and brother of John Macomber of the Mass. 31st, of 
Major George B. Macomber of the Mass. 34th, and of James Macomber 
of the Mass. 51st. 

Henry I. Macomber was a carpenter and learned the trade 
of his father. He enlisted with his brother William at the age 
of seventeen and was appointed Corporal. He was wounded 
June 3, 1864, at Cold Harbor, but returned to duty and continued 
through the war. 

After the war, he followed his trade of carpenter, residing in 
Oakham, where he died August 19, 1870. 



William Macomber. 

Mustered in, August 2, 1862. 
Mustered out, June 8, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, June 10, 1847, son of John J. and Abigail (Packard) 
Macomber. 

William Macomber learned the trade of carpenter from his 
father and was working with him when he enlisted, at the age 
of fifteen. He was promoted to the rank of Corporal, and later 
was made Sergeant. In the assault on the breastworks at 
Petersburg on the morning of January 17, 1864, the color 



THE CIVIL WAR 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 219 

bearer of the regiment, Sergeant Stevens, was severely wounded ; 
Sergeant Macomber seized the colors and bore them through 
the action, and served as color bearer from that time till the 
close of the war. 

After the war, he followed his trade in Paxton and Hudson. 

October 23, 1873, he was married to Clara J. Parker of 
Paxton, and had eight children, the first two born in Paxton, 
the others in Hudson: Arthur, September 2.'], 1874; Bertrand, 
September 17, 1878; Clarence, July 16, 1881 ; George, October 
10, 1883; Onata, August 26, 1885; Ralph, March 28, 1887; 
Sadie, June 8, 1889; Paul, May 26, 1892. 

Sergeant William Macomber died August 10, 1907, in Hudson. 

Major Fairbank said of these two brothers: "Where the 
danger was greatest, the Macombers were always pluckiest." 



Lewis T. Pellett. 

Mustered in, August 4, 1862. 
Mustered out, January 8, 1865. 

Born in Canterbury, Conn., May 25, 1834. He came to Oakham in 
1854, was employed as bootmaker for several years, and afterward in 
farm work. 

When the 36th regiment was being recruited, he was living 
on the Spooner place with Charles L. Haskell, and enlisted with 
him in the same company and regiment, continuing in the service 
to the close of the war. 

After returning from the war, he lived in Oakham, and in 
Canterbury, Windham, and Scotland, Conn. 

In August, 1854, he was married to Ruth E. Chamberlain, 
sister of Lieutenant Edward Chamberlain. She was born Octo- 
ber 7, 1840, in Holden. They had two children : 

Hannah E., born October 11, 1856, married George Dewey, 
has two sons, and lives in Millbury, Mass. 

Ruth E., born December 7, 1859, married Mr. Lee, and had 
tv/o daughters. Mrs. Lee died in Worcester, Mass., May 29, 
1913- 



2 20 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Mrs. Ruth Pellett died in Oakham, December 7, 1859, and 
Mr. Pellett was again married, in January, 1861, to Ellen E. 
Davis, sister of Mrs. Charles H. Trowbridge. They had nine 
children : 

Caroline T., born November 5, 1862, in Oakham, married 
George Gordon and lives in Gardner, Mass. 

Frederick B., born October 15, 1866, in Canterbury, is married, 
has two children, and lives in Scotland, Conn. 

Herbert O., born April 5, 1868, in Canterbury, lives in Scot- 
land, Conn. 

Henry L., born May 11, 1870, is married and lives in 
Herkimer, N. Y. 

Benjamin C, born October 26, 1871, in Scotland, lives in 
Gardner, Mass. 

Elonzo W., born August 15, 1874, in Scotland, lives in Plain- 
field, Conn. 

Leonard W., born March 3, 1876, in Windham, died April 7, 
1876. 

Lewis E., bom October 15, 1878, in Windham, is married, has 
three children, and lives in Gardner, Mass. He was a soldier in 
the Spanish War. 

Joseph A., born September 12, 1879, in Windham, lives in 
Franklin, Conn. 

Mrs. Pellett died in April, 1880, in Windham. 

Mr. Lewis T. Pellett died in Windham, May 31, 1885. 

Daniel Rawson. 

Mustered in, August 4, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Bom in Oakham, May 27, 1824, son of Daniel and Clarissa (Fairbank) 
Rawson. His father, Daniel Rawson, came to Oakham from North 
Brookfield between 1820 and 1823. He was the son of Levi Rawson, 
born March 27, 1748, in Mendon, Mass., who married for his second 
wife Mrs. Nancy Fairbank, who became stepmother to Daniel Rawson 
and was own mother to his wife, Clarissa Fairbank. Clarissa Fairbank 
was daughter of Laban and Nancy (Wheelock) Fairbank. Her father, 
Laban Fairbank, born in Dedham, October i, 1755, was son of Samuel 
Fairbank, a Revolutionary soldier. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 221 

Daniel Rawson was a farmer living in Oakham, when at the 
age of thirty-eight he enlisted in the 36th regiment. He survived 
the hardships of army life just one year, and died of disease, 
August 4, 1863, at Baltimore, Md. 

He was married to Mrs. Rachel Whittemore and had four 
children, all born in Oakham: Clarissa E., July 25, 1856; Abbie 
Maria, November i, 1857; Annie F., September 7, 1859; Emily 
A., April 26, 1862. 

After Mr. Rawson's death, the family lived at the Belknap 
place. 

Barzillai Miles Reed. 

Mustered in, August 12, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born in Oakham, January 10, 1834. His father was Lewis H. Reed, 
who lived on the place now owned by George Morse. Lewis Reed was 
the son of Silas Reed and brother of Rev. Andrew and Deacon Cheney 
Reed. Comrade Reed's mother, Mary R. Miles, was daughter of Barzil- 
lai and Sarah (Reed) Miles of Rutland. 

Barzillai Miles Reed was living on the farm left by his father 
when, at the age of twenty-eight, he enlisted in Co. K, 36th 
Mass. He received wounds in the action at Campbell's Station, 
November 16, 1863, from which he never recovered. When the 
regiment left Knoxville, he was detailed as nurse at the Court 
House Hospital, where he died, January 17, 1864. 

May 13, 1858, he was married to Mary E. Foster of Barre, 
and had two children born in Oakham : William Leroy, October 
17, 1859; Susan Elizabeth, September 13, 1861. 

William Leroy Reed was married, November 17, 1886, at 
West Brookfield, Mass., to Jennie Louise Holt, and has one son, 
Leroy Kendall Reed, born September 21, 1887, at Worcester. 
Leroy Kendall Reed was married, October 10, 1911, at Hartford, 
Conn., to Rose Pauline Wollenhaupt of Rochester, N. Y. He 
is window dresser for the Jordan Marsh Company of Boston. 

Susan Elizabeth Reed was married at Providence, R. L, Sep- 
tember 2, 1886, to Herbert Carleton. They have had three chil- 



222 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

dren: Albert Sawyer Carleton, born July 21, 1887, at Worcester, 
died in the same city, July 30, 1903 ; Walter Herbert Carleton,- 
born February 17, 1890, in Worcester; Lucy May Carleton, 
born April 30, 1894, in Leicester, Mass., married June 25, 1913, 
at Worcester, to Christian Charles Brenneman of Shippingport, 
Penn. 

Mrs. Mary E. Reed lives in Worcester : address Bloomingdale 
Hospital. 



Edwin Charles Spooner. 

Mustered in, July 30, 1862. 
Discharged, March 22, 1865. 

Born January 5, 1824, in Oakham, son of Deacon Andrew and Sally 
(Adams) Spooner, and brother of Albert Spooner of the 25th Mass. and 
of Andrew Spooner of the 51st Mass. 

Edwin C. Spooner, by occupation a farmer, enlisted at the age 
of thirty-eight. While he was in the war, his family lived on 
the Charles Keith farm. After the close of the war, he lived 
three years in New Braintree. In 1871 he returned to the Keith 
farm, where he remained till 1880. In 1883 he purchased the 
Stephen Lincoln farm on the old turnpike, and lived there till 
his death. This farm is still owned by his descendants. 

April II, 1848, he married Almira Ann Davis, daughter of 
Solomon Davis of New Braintree. They had five children, all 
born in Oakham: Charles Andrew, February 23, 1849; Martha 
Ann, August 25, 1854; Olive Francena, June 15, 1856; Arthur 
Buss, October 3, i860; Frank Edwin, May 26, 1862, died April 
20, 1869. 

Charles A. Spooner was married to Sarah D. Wilder of 
Gardner, November 27, 1872, and had three children: Eddie, 
born November 22, 1873, died May 15, 1888; Fannie, born 
January 22, 1877, married October 9, 1895, to Raynor Upham 
of Rutland, died February 18, 1897, leaving one child, Lillian, 
born September 20, 1896; George, born January 28, 1881, 
married August 20, 1904, to Bessie Upham of Gardner, 





LIEUTKNANT EDWARD CHAMBERLAIN 
36th Mass. Infantry 



CHARLES HAYNES STEARNS 
36th Mass. Infantry 






BARZILLAI MILES REED 
36th Mass. Infantry 



LAHAN F. RAWSON 
40th Mass. Infantry 



THE CIVIL WAR — 36TH MASS. INFANTRY 223 

Martha A. Spooner was married January i, 1874, to William 
O. Warren of Oakham, a woodworker and later a shoemaker. 
Children: Ella M., born August 5, 1875, married W. Kenneth 
Nichols June 4, 1902, and had one boy, Warren Nichols, born 
February 21, 1904, died November 5, 1912; Ida M., born Decem- 
ber II, 1876, died December 18, 1883; Frank E., born June 
14, 1879, died August 2, 1881 ; Eva F., born October 10, 1881, 
died December 27, 1883; Florence B., born September 14, 1883; 
Albion W., born September 30, 1885; Carrie M., born July 9, 
1887; Hazel O., born June 24, 1890. 

Mrs. Almira Ann Spooner died in Oakham, April 30, 1900. 

Mr. Edwin C. Spooner died in Oakham, March 25, 1904. 



Charles Haynes Stearns. 

Mustered in, August 15, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born March 28, 1836, in Oakham, son of Isaac Stearns. His mother 
was Betsy Bent of Sudbury, who first married A. Josiah Stone of 
Grafton. They removed to Oakham, where Mr. Stone died October 13, 
1823. After his death, Mrs. Stone married Isaac Stearns, who was born 
in Waltham, January 19, 1786, and died in Oakham May 3, 1837. Isaac 
Stearns was son of Jonathan and Mary Bigelow Stearns. 

Charles H. Stearns learned the trade of wheelwright with 
Nahum P. Humphrey of Oakham, for whom he was working 
when he enlisted at the age of twenty-seven. He died of disease 
September 15, 1863, at Crab Orchard, Ky. At the time of his 
death Major Fairbank wrote: "Stearns was a faithful, honest 
soldier, always in his place and of good habits. He is as truly a 
martyr to his country's cause as if he had been killed in battle." 

May 12, 1858, he was married to Melancy Dennison Dean, 
daughter of Elijah and Delotia (Eastman) Dean and sister of 
Seth and Daniel W. Dean, who influenced Stearns to enlist with 
them in Co. K. Two children were born in Oakham: Emma 
Maria, September 22, 1859; Charles Daniel, January 4, 1863. 

Mrs. Stearns and the children are now living in Pasadena, Cal. 



2 24 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Daniel W. Dean. 

Mustered in, August 8, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born July 28, 1843, son of Elijah and Delotia (Eastman) Dean. 

He enlisted at the age of nineteen, with his brother Seth 
Dean, in the 36th regiment, for the town of New Braintree. 
Both died during the first six months. Daniel, after an attack 
of measles, returned to the regiment, though really unfit for 
duty. On the march in November, 1862, he fell out by the 
wayside and was never heard from. 

Seth Dean. 

Mustered in, August 8, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born February 23, 1838, in Oakham, son of Elijah and Delotia (East- 
man) Dean. He was the brother of Samuel Dean, and of Isaiah Dean 
of the 2ist Mass. 

Seth Dean enlisted for the town of New Braintree at the age 
of twenty-three, by occupation a farmer. 

He died at Aqua Creek, Va., January 28, 1863. 

William Ware. 

Mustered in, August 7, 1862. 
Mustered out, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, March 28, 1828, son of James B. and Betsy (Capen) 
Ware, and brother of Henry H. Ware of the 25th Mass. 

William Ware enlisted at the age of thirty-four, for the town 
of Paxton, in Co. K, 36th Mass. He was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, from which he was mustered out at 
the close of the war. 

After his return he lived in Brookfield, where he was married 
to Miss Flagg of that town, by whom he had one daughter, 
Mr. Ware died many years ago. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 39TH MASS. INFANTRY 225 

39th Mass. Infantry. 
Asahel Bullard. 

Mustered in, July 13, 1863. 
Mustered out, May 25, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, March 13, 1831, son of Joel and Nancy (Dwight) 
Bullard, and brother of William H. Bullard of the 25th Mass. 

Asahel Bullard was a farmer and lived with his brother, 
Sanford Henry Bullard, on the Silas Bullard place. In the sum- 
mer of 1863 he entered the army, at the age of thirty-two, and 
was assigned to Co. D, 39th Mass. He was taken prisoner and 
kept for many months in the Salisbury, Belle-isle, and Libby 
prisons. When released, he was so enfeebled by prison fare that 
he was not expected to recover. 

At the close of the war he returned to Oakham and lived on 
the Silas Bullard farm for the remainder of his life. 

He died in Oakham, of pneumonia, March 10, 1904. 



Elijah C. Dean. 

Mustered in, July 13, 1863. 
Mustered out. May 25, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, in the original Waterman house, near Wolf Meadow 
dam, son of John and Prudence (Eastman) Dean. His father was son 
of Elijah Dean, and brother of Elijah Dean, Jr. 

Elijah C. Dean entered the service in the summer of 1863 
and was assigned to Co. C, 39th Mass. This regiment joined 
the Army of the Potomac in 1864, was active at the Wilderness, 
May 4 to 6, was engaged at Spottsylvania, reached Petersburg 
on the morning of June 17, took part in the movement to the 
Weldon Railroad in August, and at Hatcher's Run in February, 
1865. 

After the war, Mr. Dean lived in Oakham till his death, which 
occurred December i, 1886. 
15 



2 26 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

40th Mass. Infantry. 

Laban F. Rawson. 

Mustered in, August 23, 1862. 
Died in the service. 

Born in Oakham, April 3, 1829, son of Daniel and Clarissa (Fairbank) 
Rawson, and brother of Daniel Rawson of the 36th Mass. 

Laban F. Rawson was a farmer living on the John Clark 
place when he enlisted, at the age of thirty-two, in Co. A of 
the 40th Mass. The 40th regiment was organized at Lynnfield 
in the summer of 1862, left the state September 8, and remained 
on picket and guard duty in the vicinity of Washington during 
the winter of 1862-63. It returned to Washington July 11, 
joined the Army of the Potomac in the pursuit of Lee's army 
into Virginia, and was ordered August 6 to Folly Island, S. C, 
where Laban F. Rawson died, September 29, 1863. 

He was married to Mary Bullen and had five children : Joseph ; 
Herbert; Emma; George H., born June 12, 1857; and Frank. 

42d Mass. Infantry. 

Sylvander Bothwell. 

Mustered in, September 30, 1862. 
Mustered out, August 20, 1863. 

Born in Oakham, February 10, 1828, son of Cheney and Charlotte (Rock- 
wood) Bothwell, and great-grandson of Alexander Bothwell, one of the 
first ten settlers of Oakham, who served in several campaigns in the 
War of the Revolution. Sylvander Bothwell was twin brother of Syl- 
vester Bothwell, who removed to Barre, and was for many years Deputy 
Sheriff of Worcester County. 

Sylvander Bothwell removed to North Brookfield when about 
twenty-one years of age, and established a provision market. 
August 20, 1862, at the age of thirty-four, he enlisted in Co. F, 
42d Mass., and was appointed Corporal. The regiment was 
sent to New Orleans, and assigned to the Department of the 
Gulf. 



THE CIVIL WAR — ^42D MASS. INFANTRY 227 

After the war, he lived in North Brookfield and was honored 
with the offices of Constable, Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, 
Tax Collector, and Trial Justice, which office gave him the title 
of Judge. 

He was married, (i) May 30, 1850, to Martha A. Mead of 
North Brookfield; (2) April 21, 1867, to Mrs. Lizzie J. Poland 
of North Brookfield. Children: Ernst S., born June 17, 1853, 
now a resident of Augusta, Ga. ; Sylvester Rockwood, born 
December 30, 1869, ^i^d May 11, 1874. 

Sylvander Bothwell died in North Brookfield, December 4, 
1901. 

John Flint Boyd. 

Mustered in, July 22, 1862. 
Mustered out, May 5, 1864. 

Born in Oakham, September 10, 1846, son of Isaac M. and Annis 
(Poland) Boyd. His father was son of Cheney and Susan (Flint) 
Boyd, and grandson of James Boyd, a Revolutionary soldier who lived 
in the southern part of the town, on the old South County Road, on 
the farm now owned by W. H. Parkman. 

John F. Boyd enHsted for the town of North Brookfield, at 
the age of eighteen, in Co. E, 42d Mass. After his discharge 
from the 42d, he reenlisted in Captain Potter's Co., 62d Mass. 

After returning from the war, he went to Omaha, and from 
there to Texas, where he was a dealer in live stock until 1874. 
In the latter part of this year he returned to Omaha and, in 
1880, became Superintendent of the South Omaha Stock Yards, 
which position he held till 1890, when he was elected Sheriff 
of Douglas County. 

He was married to Abbie F. Lovell, daughter of Jonathan 
Lovell of Oakham, November 12, 1874, and had four children: 

Leon L., born July 7, 1877, at Omaha, married in 1904, now 
a broker residing in Kansas City, Mo. 

Mabel A., born September 12, 1879, in Omaha, married in 
1900 to Brainard Smith of North Brookfield, a stockbroker. 

Lulu P., born December 5, 188 1, at Council Bluffs, married in 
1904 to Charles Canon, a manufacturer. 



228 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Bessie M., bom June 13, 1883, at Council Bluffs, died May 26, 

1895- 
Mr. John F. Boyd died at Omaha, January 26, 1892. 



Nathaniel Newton Brooks. 

Mustered in, September 30, 1862. 
Mustered out, August 20, 1863. 

Born November 27, 1828, in Worcester, Mass., son of Nathaniel and 
Mary (Chadwick) Brooks. 

In the summer of 1862 Nathaniel N. Brooks enlisted, at the 
age of twenty-three, from the city of Worcester, in Co. E of 
the 42d Mass. and served with the regiment till August, 1863, 
when he was discharged at the expiration of his term of service. 

After his return from the army he continued his occupation 
of stone mason in Worcester, Holden and Oakham. He came to 
Oakham in 1867, lived for a few years on the Dr. Spencer Field 
place, and afterward for twenty years at the North Four Cor- 
ners in the house built by Samuel Holden. April 2, 1897, he 
purchased of N. Wendell Packard the house in the village of 
Oakham in which his son-in-law, Sibley Woodis, now resides. 

In 1854 Mr. Brooks was married to Amy Ann Allen of 
Grafton, Mass. Children: 

Minnie Louise Brooks, born in Worcester, December 14, 1856, 
married August 30, 1880, to Sibley Field Woodis, son of Field 
and Sabra Wiswell (Sibley) Woodis. 

William Nathaniel Brooks, born in Worcester, August 7, 1858, 
married April 11, 1886, to Evelyn N. Pinney of Glastonbury, 
Conn. Children: Carlos Nathaniel, born in Worcester, January 
5, 1888, died in Scranton, Penn.. October 5, 1903 ; Allan Grant 
and Ralph Pinney, twins, born July 4, 1890, died in Worcester, 
Allan, August 2, and Ralph, August 7, 1890. Mrs. Evelyn 
Brooks died in Scranton February 7, 1903, and Mr. Brooks was 
again married, March 7, 1906, to Josephyne Wells Courtright 
of Wilkes-Barre, Penn. Children: Nathaniel Courtright, born 



THE CIVIL WAR — 42D MASS. INFANTRY 229 

in Wilkes-Barre, January 9, 1908 ; Clararuth, bcrn in Scranton. 
April 3, 1909. 

Jennie Allen Brooks, born in Oakham, January 30, 1861, died 
in Oakham October 16, 1880. 

Mrs. Nathaniel N. Brooks died in Oakham, May 17, 1890, 
aged fifty-four years. 

Mr. Brooks died in Oakham, June 25, 1897, aged sixty-nine 
years. 



Joseph Sylvester Bruce. 

Mustered in, November I, 1862. 

Mustered out, August 20, 1863. 

Address, Barre, Mass. 

Born October 15, 1841, in Petersham, Mass., son of Joseph F. and 
Abigail (Richmond) Bruce. 

Joseph S. Bruce enlisted from the town of Barre, in the late 
summer of 1862, at the age of twenty-one, by occupation a 
blacksmith, in Co. K, 42d Mass., and served till September, 1863. 

Since his return from the war, he has followed his occupation 
in Hubbardston from 1867 to 1872, in Oakham from 1872 to 
1885, and since 1885 in Barre. 

January 14, 1864, he was married in Barre to Hannah Jane 
Chamberlin, youngest daughter of Lyman and Celia (Williams) 
Chamberlin. Children : 

Harry Sylvester Bruce, born September 5, 1865, married June 
26, 1901, to Sophronia Kimball. They had one child who died 
in infancy. Harry S. Bruce is a teacher of manual training, 
and resides in Barre. 

Walter Jay Bruce, born in Hubbardston, August 23, 1868, 
married July 27, 1902, to Mary Burnett. They have had three 
children, all born in Oakham : Joseph S., in 1902, died same year; 
Doris Bruce, April 11, 1903; Joseph Walter, January 25, 1906. 

Edith May Bruce, born in Hubbardston, July 31, 1872. 

Bessie Louise Bruce, born in Oakham, March 28, 1876, married 
May 16, 1895, to Clarence A. Stone, who died November 28, 1906. 



230 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Charles S. Knight. 

Mustered in, September 30, 1862. 
Discharged, November 26, 1862. 

Name changed from Joshua Lawrence Knight. Born in Oakham, 
October 11, 1818, son of Silas and Abiah E. (Richmond) Knight, and 
brother of Hiram Knight of North Brookfield. His father, Silas 
Knight, was grandson of Silas Knight, who was born in Sudbury, May 
5, 1757. and who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 

Charles S. Knight began his career as a school-teacher in the 
winter of 1839-40, with forty-eight pupils, in the West Center 
District in Oakham, and continued to teach for several years 
in this and other towns, removing to Leicester in 1844, where 
he was installed as Principal of the first High School started 
in Leicester township. Later he was in business in Leicester 
for a number of years as a manufacturer of carriages. He 
served the town of Leicester as Constable, Assessor, Collector, 
Treasurer, member of the School Committee, and Selectman. 
In 1862, at the age of forty-four, he enlisted in the 42d Mass., 
but was physically unable to endure the hardships of camp life 
and was discharged at the end of a month. 

After the war, he was in business in New York City till 1875. 
He was Warden of the North Brookfield Town Farm till 1882, 
when he bought a farm in North Brookfield, on which he lived 
till his death, September 11, 1893. 

He was married, (i) May 21, 1846, to Anna S. Howard of 
Leicester, who died February 19, 1856; (2) November 16, i860, 
to Louesa A. Edwards of Leicester. Children: 

Charles A. H., born in Leicester January 17, 1849, died Sep- 
tember 25, 1849. 

Ruth W., born in Leicester February 7, 185 1, died in Wor- 
cester, April, 1897. 

Fred, born in Leicester September 23, 1853, married Septem- 
ber 20, 1880, to Abbie E. Chase of Worcester, now connected 
with the Worcester Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 

Frank, born in Leicester February 3, 1856, died April 11, 1856. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 42D MASS. INFANTRY 23 1 

Cora B., born in Leicester August 4, 1864, now Mrs. Parkman 
T. Denny of Leicester. 

James Arthur, born in Leicester October 9, 1867, died in North 
Brookfield March 30, 1883. 

Charles Lester, born December 20, 1869, in Leicester, married 
in April, 1896, to Ina I. Richardson of North Brookfield, now 
a carpenter in Fairfield, Conn. 

Louesa May, born in New York December 22, 1871, died 
there July 8, 1875. 

Jennie L., born in North Brookfield March i, 1878, Librarian 
of the Levi Heywood Memorial Library of Gardner, Mass., till 
her death, December 3, 1912. 

Charles E. Warren. 

Died in the service. 

Son of Eber H. and Miriam (Gibbs) Warren, and brother of Corporal 
Jonathan G. Warren of the 25th Mass., was born in Oakham, December 
2, 1846. 

While living in Hard wick on a farm, he enlisted, at the age 
of eighteen, in the 42d regiment. Soon after going South, he 
was poisoned while on a foraging expedition. He was sent 
home, and died in Oakham, November 28, 1864, at the home 
of his sister, Mrs. Joseph Blake. 

44th Mass. Infantry. 
John Adams. 

Mustered in, September 12, 1862. 

Discharged, June 18, 1863. 

Reenlisted, April 6, 1864. 

Mustered out, July 30, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, April 4, 1827, son of Dr. Charles and Sarah (McAl- 
lister) Adams. Dr. Charles Adams was born in Brookfield, February 
13, 1782, and was a descendant in the sixth generation of Henry Adams 
who came from England to America about 1630 and settled in what 
is now Quincy. He was educated at Leicester Academy and studied 
medicine with Dr. Asa Walker of Barre. Dr. Adams settled, as a 



232 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

physician, in Antrim, N. H., in 1807. On the death of Dr. Seth Fobes 
in 1816, he removed to Oakljam, where he continued in practice till his 
death, March 6, 1875. John Adams was brother of Charles Adams, 
Treasurer of the State of Massachusetts. His sister Charlotte, born in 
Antrim May 21, 1813, married John F. Howard of Boston, November I, 
1835, and was the mother of Charles F. Howard of Co. H, 25th Mass. 

John Adams was a bookkeeper for the North Brookfield firm 
of T. & E. Batcheller, at their sales room in Boston, when he 
enlisted for the term of nine months, from Winchester, Mass., 
in Co. G, 44th Regiment. This regiment was sent to Newbern, 
N. C, and took part in the expedition to Goldsboro in December, 
1862. 

After his discharge from the 44th, he enlisted again from 
Oakham in Co. K, 57th Mass. Perhaps no regiment suffered 
more than did the 57th between April, 1864, and July, 1865. 
They went through the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania 
Courthouse, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and the first and second 
battles of Petersburg. The regiment met with terrible destruc- 
tion in the crater at Petersburg, July 30, when four thousand 
Union soldiers were sacrificed through the incapacity and 
cowardice of the division commanders. 

After the war, John Adams took up again his old occupation 
of bookkeeper with the Batchellers. Later he was with the woolen 
company at Denny ville (now South Barre), and for several 
years with the Lakeville Woolen Company at West Rutland, 
where he died, November 28, 1889. 

He was married, October 14, i860, to Marietta Pierce of 
Boston. 

46th Mass. Infantry. 

Payson Brainerd Humphrey. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 29, 1863. 

Address, City Hospital, Springfield, Mass. 

Born in Oakham, May 19, 1841, son of Nahum P. and Mariah Louise 
(Martin) Humphrey. His father, born in Littleton March i, 1810, a 
carriage manufacturer in Oakham for twenty-five years, was a member 



THE CIVIL WAR — 46TH MASS. INFANTRY 233 

of the Congregational Church and a prominent citizen. He was Postmas- 
ter under President Lincoln, Selectman in 1848 and 1850, and represented 
Oakham in the Massachusetts Legislature in 1856. In 1864 he removed 
to Springfield, where he was in the employ of the Boston and Albany- 
Railroad. He died March 6, 1908, at the age of ninety-eight years. 

Payson B. Humphrey went to Springfield in 1857 and became 
a salesman in the house of D. H. Brigham & Company, and had 
the reputation of being one of the best salesmen in the city. 
He enlisted in Springfield, September 25, 1862, in Co. A, 46th 
Mass. This regiment was ordered to Newbern, N. C, and took 
part in the Goldsboro expedition in December, 1862. It was sent 
to Fortress Monroe June 24, and after doing guard duty at 
Baltimore, joined the Army of the Potomac and moved with 
it into Virginia. 

After leaving the army, Mr. Humphrey continued as a clothing 
salesman with D. H. Brigham & Company in Springfield. 

He was married to Mrs. Orpha Fiske about 1869, and still 
resides in Springfield. 



Joseph Joslyn. 

Mustered in, September 25, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 29, 1863. 

Born April 13, 1839, at Perkins, Ohio. His father, James Joslyn, son 
of Joseph and Nabby Joslyn, was born in New Braintree, November i. 
1803. He went to Bethany, N. Y., and later to Perkins, Ohio, from which 
place he came to Oakham in 1840 and lived on the Joseph Chaddock 
place till 1852, when he went to California. He died in Springfield, 
Mass., in 1880. Capt. Joseph Joslyn, the father of James, was born in 
Lancaster, July 4, 1776, and died in 1814, in Pelham, Mass. 

Joseph Joslyn went from Oakham to Springfield with his 
mother and brother Charles in 1854, and was employed as a 
bookkeeper in the business house of Tinkham & Company. In 
1858 he came to Oakham and gave the young men of the town 
their first instruction in gymnastics. This resulted in improved 
physical development for many of them. He enlisted September 
25, 1862, in Co. A, 46th Mass. 



2 34 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

After leaving the army, he returned to his former occupation 
of bookkeeper in Springfield, Mass. November 12, 1863, he 
was married to Orianna P. Humphrey, daughter of Nahum P. 
Humphrey and sister of Payson B. Humphrey of Oakham, his 
tent-mate in the army. They had three children, born in 
Springfield : 

Payson H., born November 24, 1864, died August 9, 1894. 

George B., born May 19, 1866, married October 30, 1895, 
to Sophie Stebbins. Address, 60 Garfield Street, Springfield, 
Mass. 

Marshall, born December 19, 1870, died of meningitis, Sep- 
tember 10, 1910, in Yokohama, Japan, where he was manager 
for the plant of the American Graphophone Record Company. 

Joseph Joslyn went west about 1872, and died in Loudon, 
Tenn., September 22, 1890. 



51st Mass. Infantry. 

The 51st regiment, recruited in Worcester County in the 
summer and autumn of 1862, was mustered into service Sep- 
tember 25 to November 11, left the state November 25, under 
command of Colonel A. B. R. Sprague, arrived at Beaufort 
November 30, moved to Newbern, and was assigned to Colonel 
Amory's Brigade. It took part in the expedition to Goldsboro 
in the early part of December. Companies B and F were detached 
from January 5 to February 15 for picket duty on the Neuse 
Road, three miles above Fort Totten. The regiment served 
from March 3 to May 4 on garrison duty along the line of 
the railroad from the Trent River to the Seaboard. Companies 
E and F were located at Beaufort, N. C, and had quarters in 
the Front Street House. The regiment returned to Newbern 
May 4, and on June 24 it was ordered to Fortress Monroe. 
Volunteering for further service after its term of enlistment had 
expired, it was sent to Baltimore, joined the Army of the 
Potomac near Hagerstown, and took part in the pursuit of 
General Lee's army into Virginia. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 5IST MASS. INFANTRY 235 

Wilder E. Dean. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Address, North Brookfield, Mass. 

Born August 14, 1841, son of Elijah, Jr., and Mary M. (Goodale) 
Dean. He was by occupation a farmer, and enlisted at the age of 
twenty-one. 

Since his return from the war, he has resided in North Brook- 
field. For ten years he was in the meat business, and has since 
been a carpenter and builder. He held the office of Constable 
thirty-two years, is a member of Post 51, G. A. R., and has 
been Commander three years; is also a m^ember of Woodbine 
Lodge 180, I. O. O. F., and is Vice Grand. 

December 24, 1871, he was married to Lucella L. Woodis, 
and has had two children : 

George A., born June 29, 1872; married October 10, 1901, 
to Florence A. Gilbert of North Brookfield. He is First Assist- 
ant Manager in the main office of the American Express Co. 
at Springfield, Mass., and resides at 106 Washington Road, 
Forest Park. 

David W., born January 12, 1877; died March 26, 1902, in 
North Carolina, where he had gone with his father and mother 
for his health. 

Edwin Sprague Gould. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Reenlisted, July 15, 1S64. 

Discharged, November 27, 1864. 

Address, 226 Pine St., Providence, R. I. 

Born in New Braintree, Mass., February 20, 1844, the youngest of 
eight children of Rufus and Mary (Henry) Gould, and brother of John 
Williams Gould of the 25th Mass. 

Edwin S. Gould left Williston Seminary, where he had gone 
in 1861 with his brother John and a companion. L. D. Wood, 
and enlisted in Co. F, 51st Mass., at the age of nineteen. On 
December 11, 1862, while on the Goldsboro expedition, he had 



236 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

a severe sunstroke, from which he has never fully recovered. 
He was discharged at the expiration of his term of service. 
In the summer of 1864, he enlisted again, in Co. F, 60th Mass., 
and was made Corporal. 

After returning from his second enlistment in the fall of 1864, 
he resumed his studies at Phillips Academy, Andover, but in 1865 
gave up further study in preparation for college by the advice 
of his oculist. He did newspaper work on the Hartford Courant 
and Post, and on the Worcester Gazette and Advertiser, for 
about four years, when he entered the Hartford Theological 
Seminary, from which he was graduated in 1872. He was 
ordained and installed as pastor of the Richmond Street Free 
Congregational Church in Providence, R. I., October i, 1873. 
Subsequently he preached at West Brookfield for nearly five 
years, and was called from the church there to what is now the 
Humphrey Street Congregational Church in New Haven, Conn., 
but decided not to accept the call. 

In July, 1883, he suffered severely from a railroad accident 
in New York, and since that misfortune has not felt equal to 
the full work of a pastor, but preached at Woonsocket, R. I., 
from 1886 to 1889, and at Athol, Mass., from 1890 to 1896. 
He was for many years Department Chaplain of the Rhode 
Island G. A. R., and visited and addressed nearly all the Posts 
in the state. 

He was married, October 20, 1875, to Phebe S. Gladding, 
a teacher in one of the Providence schools. She died September 
2, 1899, at Danielson, Conn., where Mr. and Mrs. Gould had 
spent much of their time when on vacation. 



James Packard Macomber. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 
Died in the army. 

Born in Oakham, August 26, 1843, son of John J. and Abigail (Pack- 
ard) Macomber. 

James Macomber enlisted at the age of nineteen. He died of 
congestive chills at Newbern, January 17, 1863. The company 



THE CIVIL WAR — 5IST MASS. INFANTRY 237 

was at Camp Sprague, a small log-house camp on the Neuse 
Road, three miles above Fort Totten, where Cos. F and B were 
stationed on picket duty. On the afternoon of Thursday, Jan- 
uary 15, he was taken suddenly ill, and on Friday he was 
removed to the Stanley General Hospital at Newbern, where 
he died on the following day. He was the first man in Co. F 
to die in the service, and his sudden death from disease, when 
he had been apparently in perfect health, made an impression 
on the company that was not soon forgotten. 

When there was need of more men, James Macomber fol- 
lowed his four brothers and enlisted. Like them, he was a good 
soldier, brave, prompt, faithful, never absent from duty, glad 
always to do more than his share. 



William Henry Maynard. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Born in Oakham April 28, 1843, son of Artemas and Caroline Maria 
(Taylor) Maynard. His father was grandson of Francis Maynard, a 
tailor who came to Oakham from Rutland before 1777 and purchased the 
farm which has continued to be the home of the Maynard family till 
the present day. His mother was daughter of Roswell and Isabella (Ham- 
mond) Taylor, and was born in Spencer, Mass. After her mother's 
death, she lived with her aunt, Mrs. Aurelia (Hammond) Maynard (wife 
of Ezra Maynard), in a house on the old Turnpike, a little east of the 
schoolhouse. 

William Henry Maynard was working with his father on the 
farm at the time of his enlistment, at the age of nineteen. In 
the spring following his return from the army, he went to 
Worcester and was employed for a time in a grocery store. In 
1867 he began work with Burbank & Howland. Three years 
later he and Gough bought out Howland, and the business was 
continued under the name of A. L. Burbank & Co., till 1872, 
when Burbank withdrew and the firm of Maynard, Gough & 
Co. was formed. They were printers and blank book makers, 
and their specialty was hotel registers. After Mr. Maynard's 



238 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

death the business was incorporated under the name of the 
Maynard-Gough Company. 

He was married January 16, 1889, to Dora Melinda Perham 
of Worcester, and had two children, both of whom died young: 
Marion, born May 25, 1890, died February 20, 1896; William 
Henry, born August 3, 1891, died December 25, 1891. 

Mr. Maynard died of pneumonia. May 26, 1891. He was 
noted for his kindness and liberality toward the men in his 
employ. One day a workman came to him and asked to have 
a costly accident for which he was responsible charged to his 
account and the loss taken from his wages. Mr. Maynard 
replied : "You are a poor man, and have only what you earn 
by hard work. You are honest and faithful ; we all make 
mistakes. Not a cent will be taken from your wages for this 
accident." 



George Marshall Ross. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Address, Coldbrook Springs, Mass. 

Born April 9, 1840, in Oakham. His father, David Sumner Ross, was 
corn in West Brookfield, October 3, 1808, son of Ansel and Hannah 
(Crowell) Ross, and grandson of John Ross, a Revolutionary soldier. 
The Ross family lived in West Brookfield for several generations, and 
were among the early settlers of the town. David S. Ross came to Oak- 
ham from Ware about 1837. He was Overseer of the Poor and Assessor 
for many years. Selectman for seven years, represented the town in the 
Legislature in the years 1854 and 1855, and was delegate from Oakham 
to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention in 1853. The mother of 
George M. Ross was Ann (Packard) Ross, daughter of Parley Packard, 
and granddaughter of Nehemiah Packard, a Revolutionary soldier who 
served in the army that besieged Boston in 1777, and in the Northern 
Army under General Gates in the same year. 

George M. Ross, a farmer by occupation, enlisted at the age 
of twenty-two. After the war he lived for a year each in Ware 
and Hardwick, spent a year in the west in Nebraska and Colo- 
rado, and returned to Oakham in 1867. He went to Warren 



THE CIVIL WAR — 5 1 ST MASS. INFANTRY 239 

the following year, and in 1875 removed to Barre and purchased 
the Broad Farm, near Coldbrook, on which he still resides. 

He was married June 7, 1871, to Eliza J. Skipper of Warren, 
and has four children: Frank Eugene, born September 14, 1872; 
Mary Anna, born December 11, 1875; Elsie Louise, born March 
II, 1878; Jennie Eliza, born August 24, 1880. 

Frank Eugene was graduated in 1896 from the School of 
Technology in Worcester and is now with the Gilro Machine 
Company, Oakland, Cal. 

Mary Anna and Elsie Louise were graduated from Becker's 
Business College in 1900. Mary Anna was married October 26, 
1904, to Charles C. Camber of Revere, Mass., and has three 
children: Grace Elizabeth, born May 20, 1907; Stephen Ross, 
born February 4, 1909; Ruth Weston, born August 18, 1910. 

Jennie Eliza was graduated from Burdett's Business College 
in 1908, and is living with her brother Frank in Oakland. 



Levander D. Sargeant. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Address, North Brookfield, Mass. 

Born in Franklin, Mass., February 18, 1844, son of Charles A. and 
Susan (Brown) Sargeant, and brother of Edward J. Sargeant of the 
25th Mass., also of James Sargeant of Oakham, and S. M. Sargeant of 
Worcester. Charles A. Sargeant was son of Asa S. Sargeant of Franklin. 

When the war began, Levander D. Sargeant was working as 
a shoemaker with his father in Oakham. He enlisted at the 
age of eighteen. 

After his return, he worked at his trade in Oakham till he 
became of age, and later located in North Brookfield, where 
he was a machine operator in the Batcheller shoe factory. 

He was married October 29, 1874, to Carrie R. Harrington, 
daughter of Warren and Mary Ann (Gault) Harrington of 
Oakham. 



240 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Hiram P. Shedd. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Address, 514 W. 24th St., Cedar Falls, la. 

Born in Oakham, August 8, 1842. His father, Israel Proctor Shedd, 
was born April i, 1812, in Springfield, Vt., and died September 26, 1879, 
in Oakham. He was a member of the Methodist Church and a prominent 
citizen. He was married April 2, 1839, to Mary Hoar, who was born 
August 15, 1815, in Templeton, Mass., and died September 29, 1876, in 
Oakham. 

Hiram P. Shedd was working on his father's farm when 
he enlisted, at the age of twenty. Soon after returning from 
the war, he removed to North Brookfield. In the early part 
of 1871, he went west and settled in Marion, Iowa, which had 
been, for several years, the home of Ames Fobes. Two years 
later he removed to Cherokee, Iowa. 

He was married May 6, 1868, to Lydia Alvira Barr of North 
Brookfield, who was born July 3, 1849. ^y this marriage there 
were three children : Ada Maria, born August 9, 1870, in North 
Brookfield; Walter Edward, born January 22, 1872, in Marion; 
Arthur Lyman, born October 25, 1873, in Cherokee. 

Mrs. Lydia Shedd died November 25, 1879, in Cherokee, 
and on December 26, 1883, he was again married to Lizzie 
Jane Pendleton of Cherokee, who was born March 10, 1856. 
By this marriage there were four children, all born in Cherokee : 
Edith Mary, September 20, 1884; Amy Belle, June 28, 1886; 
Harry Proctor, October 24, 1893 ; Jesse Edwin, April 2, 1895. 

Ada Maria married October 20, 1892, John A. Pendleton of 
Cherokee, brother of her stepmother, and has seven children, 
all born in Cherokee : Charles Hiram, October 2, 1893 ; Mary 
Belle, August 29, 1895 ; Ray Arthur, July 9, 1897 ; Rena Jane, 
February 9, 1899; Rex Walter, October 23, 1900; Helen 
Elizabeth, April 16, 1902; and another son, February 12, 1908, 

Walter Edward married June A. Linthurst of Loveland, Colo., 
October 6, 1908. A child, Walter Linthurst, was born October 
6, 1909. 



THE CIVIL WAR— 5 1 ST MASS. INFANTRY 241 

Arthur Lyman was married in Cherokee to Emma Pendleton, 
sister of his stepmother. 

Andrew Spooner. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Born October 22, 1817, in Oakham, son of Deacon Andrew and Sally 
(Adams) Spooner. 

Andrew Spooner was by occupation a farmer, and enlisted 
at the age of forty-four. After the war he returned to Oakham 
and followed farming for the remainder of his life. He served 
the town as Overseer of the Poor, Assessor, and member of the 
School Committee. 

He was married in Paxton, September lo, 1844, to Mary 
Brown of Leicester, by whom he had four children: Marion 
Frances, born May 27, 1846, in West Brookfield; Mary Ella, 
born October 14, 185 1 ; Hattie Ann, born June 3, 1855; Lucien 
Brown, born January 11, 1857; the last three in Oakham. 

Mrs. Mary B. Spooner died December 17, 1857, and he was 
again married to Eliza Dean, daughter of Dr. John and Nancy 
(Parks) Dean, December 14, 1864, and had one child: Lilla 
Bell, born September 4, 1868. 

Marion Frances was married to Charles Dayton, June 10, 
1872. Mr. Dayton died February 28, 1883, and she was again 
married, May 19, 1900, to Charles A. Ware of the 6th Unattached 
Mass. Vol. Militia. 

Mary Ella began to teach in the schools of Oakham when 
fifteen years of age; entered Mount Holyoke College in Sep- 
tember, 1868; was made instructor in that institution in 1872, 
where she continued for twelve years ; taught in Oahu College, 
Honolulu, for seven years; studied in the University of Cali- 
fornia, and received from that institution in 1893 the degree 
of Bachelor of Letters. On June 26, 1894, she was married 
to Julius Waverly Brown of Leicester, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown taught five years in New Hampshire, and several years 
16 



242 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

among the colored people of Virginia, and in the highlands of 
Kentucky. They now reside in Springfield, Mass. 

Hattie Ann married Emory B. F. Draper of Leicester, in 
November, 1880. Children: Mary Anna, born February 26, 
1882, married June 15, 191 1, Fred Lester Tucker; Ella Jane, 
born November 20, 1884, graduated from Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege in 1907, missionary under the Baptist Board at Nellore, 
India, sailed September 21, 1910; Arthur Daniel, born November 
I, 1886, graduated from Brown University as Bachelor of Arts 
in 1909, and resides in Worcester; Walter Emory, born in 1888, 
educated at Worcester Academy and Cornell University. 

Lucien Brown married Flora Blake of Worcester, October, 
1880, and has six children: Winifred Grace, born July 26, 1881 ; 
Bertha Miller, born August 9, 1883 ; Mabel Louise, born August 
3, 1886; Francis Albert, born October 21, 1888; Wilfred Blake, 
born April 12, 1897; Mary Brown, born March 31, 1899. 

Lilla Bell studied at Northfield Seminary and taught in the 
public schools of Oakham. She was married August 24, 1893, 
to Walter M. Robinson, son of John and Ruth Hathaway 
(Egery) Robinson, and has three children, born in Oakham: 
Sylvia May Daphene, September 4, 1894, student at Northfield 
Seminary; John, November 21, 1895, member of the Senior 
class in the North Brookfield High School; Hazel Dorothy, 
July 8, 1897, student at Northfield Seminary. 

Andrew Spooner died February 10, 1879, '^^ Oakham. 



Henry Parks Wright. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 

Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 
Address, 128 York St., New Haven, Conn. 

Born in Winchester, N. H., November 30, 1839, son of Parks and 
Relief Willard (Woolley) Wright. His father, Parks Wright, was 
descended from Deacon Samuel Wright, who was in Springfield in 1639. 
His mother was daughter of Dr. David Woolley, of Hinsdale, N. H., a 
Revolutionary soldier, and was granddaughter of Capt. John Crawford, 
of Oakham, also a Revolutionary soldier. 



THE CIVIL WAR 5 1ST MASS. INFANTRY 243 

After the death of his father and mother, Henry P. Wright 
came, in January, 1846, with his grandmother, Mrs. Hannah 
(Crawford) Woolley, to Oakham. He was for several years 
a teacher in the district and select schools of Oakham, and 
twenty-four of the soldiers in the Civil War had been his pupils. 
When the war began, he was a student in Phillips Academy, at 
Andover. At the end of Middle year, he left the Academy 
and enlisted. On November 4, 1862, he was appointed Sergeant. 
He was clerk of Co. F, and served as Assistant Quartermaster 
to the detachment when the company was on picket duty with 
Co. B on the Neuse Road, three miles above Fort Totten, near 
Newbern, N. C, and when on provost duty with Co. E at 
Beaufort, N. C. 

After returning home, he taught in Oakham during the fall 
and winter, finished his preparation for college under Rev. 
F. N. Peloubet (then settled over the Congregational Church in 
Oakham), entered Yale College in September, 1864, and was 
graduated as Bachelor of Arts in the Class of 1868. After 
teaching one year in the Chickering Institute in Cincinnati, he 
was appointed Tutor in Yale College and continued a member of 
the Yale Faculty for forty years. He was made Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Latin, in 1871, and Professor, in 1876. In 1884 he 
was appointed Dean of Yale College by President Porter, and 
served in that capacity for twenty-five years. He received the 
degree of Ph.D. at Yale in 1876, and the honorary degree of 
LL.D. from Union in 1895. 

Mr. Wright is a Trustee of the Connecticut College for 
Women at New London, and of the Hopkins Grammar School 
at New Haven, and is a member of the Committee on the Civil 
War Memorial to be erected at Yale. 

He was married, July 7, 1874, to Martha Elizabeth Burt, 
daughter of Alfred E. Burt of Oakham, and has had four chil- 
dren: Alice Lincoln, born July 13, 1875, in Oakham; Henry 
Burt, born January 29, 1877, in New Haven; Alfred Parks, 
born January 5, 1880, in New Haven; Ellsworth, born August 
22, 1884, in Oakham. 



244 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Alice received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Wellesley 
College in 1897, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Yale in 1901. She is a teacher of English in the State Normal 
School in New Haven. 

Henry was graduated as Bachelor of Arts from Yale in 1898, 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1903, and is now 
Assistant Professor of History in Yale College. July 24, 1907, 
he was married to Josephine Lemira Hayward, daughter of 
Dr. Joseph Warren Hayward of Taunton, Mass. 

Alfred received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Yale 
in 1901. He died in New Haven May 20, 1901. 

Sabin Aldis Morse. 

Mustered in, October 14, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 27, 1863. 

Born in Oakham, August 18, 1827, son of EUakim and Lucinda (Pond) 
Morse, and a descendant in the seventh generation from Samuel Morse, 
who came to New England in 1635, and settled in Dedham in 1637. 
Eliakim Morse, who wag born in Franklin, October 8, 1780, and died in 
Oakham, March 28, 1872, was son of Moses Morse, who was born June 
17. 1739, in Walpole and died April 3, 1790, in Franklin. Lucinda Pond, 
born July 5, 1787, was daughter of Eli Pond of Franklin, who was born 
February 19, 1742, married Huldah Hill of Medway, and died May 
20, 1802. Eliakim Morse removed from Franklin to West Springfield 
about 1810 and came to Oakham in 1816. He was a manufacturer of 
household furniture, and owned a small farm about three-quarters of 
a mile south of the center village. For several years he used as a fur- 
niture shop and store a part of the house now owned by Frank S. Conant. 

Sabin A. Morse went to Worcester soon after he was twenty- 
one, and became a salesman in the house of John D. Chollar. 
In September, 1862, he enlisted, from the city of Worcester, 
with the Oakham men in Co. F, 51st Mass., and was with the 
regiment till it was mustered out. 

After the war he continued in business in Worcester. He 
was married April 8, 185 1, to Orra W. Edison of Bridgewater, 
Mass., and had one son, Herbert S. Morse. 

Sabin A. Morse died in Worcester, October 15, 1887. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 52D MASS. INFANTRY 245 

52d Mass. Infantry. 
Wilder Fairbank Haskell. 

Mustered in, October 11, 1862. 
Mustered out, August 14, 1863. 

Bom in Oakham, August 18, 1828. His father, Thomas Haskell, born 
February 2, 1796, in North Brookfield, was brother of Nelson Haskell, 
and son of Simeon. Thomas married, April 2, 1821, Maria Pepper, 
sister of Mrs. Nelson Haskell, and daughter of John Pepper of Ware. 

Wilder F. Haskell went in 1842 from Oakham to South Had- 
ley, where he was living on a farm when the war broke out. 
He enlisted August 14, 1862, in Co. H, 52d Mass., and was 
appointed Sergeant. After the war he resided in South Hadley 
and was a millwright. 

July 13, 1856, he was married to Elizabeth A. Crowell, at 
Barnard, Vt., and had three children: Clarence Crowell, born 
July 26, 1858; Edith Lucy, born July i, i860; Harry Wilder, 
born July 14, 1867. 

Wilder F. Haskell died at South Hadley, December 24, 1894. 

Edw^in Newton Hunt. 

Mustered in, October 11, 1862. 
Mustered out, August 14, 1863. 

Born in Lee, Mass., December 14, 1835, son of Orsamus and Laura 
Hunt. 

He enlisted in the summer of 1862 from Granby, Mass., in 
Co. H, 52d Mass. The regiment reached Baton Rouge, Decem- 
ber 17, where it was encamped till March, took part in the move- 
ment to Port Hudson, was active in the assault on Port Hudson 
June 14, and occupied an advanced position in the trenches till 
the surrender. 

After the war Mr. Hunt made his home in Granby till 1873. 
He then lived two years in Barre, and came to Oakham in 1875, 
where he lived till his death. He was for several years one 
of the Assessors of Oakham. 



246 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

He was married to Clarinda Crawford, daughter of Samuel 
and Laurinda (Wilson) Crawford of Oakham and granddaughter 
of Samuel and Huldah (Berden) Crawford. Children: 

Edwin Crawford, born December i, 1879, graduated from 
Barre High School in 1898, and studied for two years at the Uni- 
versity of Vermont. August 6, 1913, he was married, in Barre, 
to Blanche Eugenia Packard, daughter of N. W. Packard of 
Westboro. 

Bessie Newton, born January 6, 1881, graduated from Barre 
High School in 1898, received the degree of B.A. from Welles- 
ley College in 1902 and the degree of M.A. from Radcliffe 
College in 191 1; by profession a teacher. 

Mr. Hunt died in Oakham, May 31, 1895. 

Mrs. Clarinda C. Hunt resides with her daughter at 8 Pine 
St., Hyde Park, Mass. 



4th Mass. Cavalry. 

Stephen A. Boyden. 

Mustered in, January 6, 1864. 

Mustered out, November 15, 1865, 

Address, 235 Pleasant St., Providence, R. I. 

Born in what is nov\^ the town of Lincoln, R. I., October 13, 1844. His 
father, Samuel Boyden, was son of Stephen Bullen of Charlton, Mass. 
Six or seven generations of Bullens are buried in Charlton. Family 
records run back to King Henry VHI, when one of the line, Anne, 
became quite famous as the second wife of Plenry VHI (Anne Boleyn). 
Samuel and his brother Adams, for local reasons, took the name of 
Boyden by act of the Massachusetts Legislature. Stephen Boyden's mother 
was Caroline Matilda Earle, daughter of Antipas Earle of Leicester. 
Antipas Earle married Amy A. Chase of Worcester in 1808 and had seven 
or eight children. After Mr. Earle's death, April 30, 1828, his widow mar- 
ried N. D. Bond of Oakham, on November 8, 1829. The Boyden children 
came in 1862 with their father and mother to Oakham. One of the 
daughters, lone, became the wife of Mr. A. J. Holden, inventor of the 
Holden Wood Furnace and founder and first president of the Oakham 
Village Improvement Society. 



i 



» 



I 





SETH DEAN 
36th Mass. Infantry 



DANIEL W. DEAN 
36th Mass. Infantry 





CHARLES SUMNER CRAWFORD 
4th Mass. Cavalry 



GEORGE \V. HASKELL 
ist Vermont Cavalry 



THE CIVIL WAR — 4TH MASS. CAVALRY 247 

At a meeting in the old town hall, Stephen A. Boyden enlisted 
in Co. C, 4th Mass. Cav. The second battalion of this regiment, 
Companies A, B, C and D, saw active service in South Carolina 
and Florida, and the first battalion in Virginia. Company E 
was the first United States company to enter Richmond on the 
morning of the evacuation by the Confederates. The regiment 
was united and recruited to its full strength and had its camp 
in the outskirts of Richmond, the streets of which it patrolled 
day and night till the regiment was mustered out in November, 
1865. 

After leaving the army, Mr. Boyden lived at the home place 
in Oakham till August, 1885, when he removed to Providence, 
R. I., and established a grocery and market. 

He was married April 18, 1888, to Harriet A. Buffum, and 
resides in Providence. 



Charles Sumner Crawford. 

Mustered in, January 6, 1864. 
Died in the service. 

Born April 10, 1846, in Oakham, son of Capt. Hosea Willis and Caro- 
line (Gault) Crawford, and brother of Henry Willis Crawford of the 
2Sth Mass., and of John Gault Crawford of the 2d Mich. Cav. 

Charles S. Crawford enlisted December 9, 1863, with Stephen 
Boyden, John Albert Walker, and George E. Reed, at a war 
meeting held in the old town hall, when his brother. Captain 
John G. Crawford, and other returned soldiers spoke. He was 
working in the Lovell shop at the time of his enlistment. 

He died at Hilton Head, S. C, August 24, 1864. His diary, 
continued up to within a few days of his death, is in possession 
of his brother, O. E. Crawford of Springfield, Mass. Stephen 
Boyden writes: 

"He was a lively and pleasing companion and easily gained the good- 
will of the commanding officer, Capt. E. B. Staples, and was almost 
constantly detailed to headquarters as Captain's Aide." 



248 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

George Edmund Reed. 

Mustered in, January 6, 1864. 
Mustered out, May 12, 1865. 

Born in Worcester, September 19, 1834, son of Edmund and Abigail 
(Stone) Reed. His father was son of Silas and Eleanor Reed, and 
brother of Rev. Andrew H. Reed who was graduated from Amherst 
College in 1826. Edmund Reed died October 24, 1835, and his widow, 
Abigail Reed, married, July 12, 1838, Denny S. Noyes. 

In his boyhood, George E. Reed became a sailor. He made 
voyages in merchant ships to England, France, China, South 
American countries, and the Sandwich Islands, rounding Cape 
Horn, and in whaling ships to the Arctic Seas. After fol- 
lowing the sea for several years he came to his father's native 
town, where he lived for the remainder of his life, except when 
he was in the service of the United States in the Civil War. 
He purchased the place which is still the home of the family, 
situated at the corner named from him "Reed Corner." 

He enlisted December 9, 1863, in Co. C, 4th Mass. Cav., by 
occupation a shoemaker, age 31, height 5 feet 7, eyes dark, 
hair brown. At Hilton Head, January 12, 1864, he was trans- 
ferred to the Navy as an ordinary seaman, and served on the 
Paul Jones, the John Adams, and the Princeton till the close 
of the war. After his discharge, he returned to his home in 
Oakham. 

September 9, 1855, he was married to Sara Amanda Williams, 
daughter of Jerry Holden and Louisa (Tower) Williams. 
Children, all but one born in Oakham: 

George Walter Reed, February 21, 1857, married Alice 
Louise Singer, December 7, 1881. Children: Alice Louise, born 
May 31, 1883; Grace May, born June 23, 1885, died August 
23, 1888; Ernest George, born February 21, 1888. 

Herbert Bent Reed, February 26, 1858, died April 27, 1885. 

Fred Edumund Reed, December 22, 1859, married Sara 
Jewett Parker, March 2, 1883. 

Frank Ellsworth Reed, February 21, 1863, married Bertha 
Florence Amsden, November 28, 1888. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 4TH MASS. CAVALRY 249 

Eugene Williams Reed, December 14, 1867, married Georgia 
Lavinia Kent, February 28, 1894. 

Arthur Knowlton Reed, August 2, 1873. 

Charlie Macullar Reed, February 19, 1876, in Spencer, Mass. 

Ben Brigham Reed, June 20, 1877, married Anna Bell Ham, 
May 20, 1903. Children: Hazel Eleanor, born May 23, 1904; 
Herbert Merritt, born February 2, 1906. 

Bert Shannon Reed, June 20, 1877, married Alice M. Bullard, 
October 2, 1910. Daughter: Dorothy Arline, born January 3, 
1912. 

George Edmund Reed died in Oakham, May 14, 1895. 



John Albert Walker. 

Mustered in, January 6, 1864. 

Mustered out, November 14, 1865. 

Address, West Acton, Mass. 

Born in Barre, Mass., October 31, 1842, son of John Walker, Jr., and 
Harriet Ann (Parker) Walker. His father was son of Rev. John 
Walker, a Baptist minister, who came to Oakham from Barre in 1835 and 
lived on a farm near Coldbrook, on the old road to Rutland. Rev. 
John Walker was pastor of the church at Coldbrook for several years, 
and continued after that to preach in various churches till his death in 
1866. Harriet Ann Parker was daughter of David Parker of Barre. 

John A. Walker enlisted in December, 1863, in Co. C, 4th 
Mass. Cav., and served till the close of the w^ar. He has resided 
since the war in Ayer, Acton, Barre, and Boxboro, Mass. For 
some years he was a miller, but has lately given his attention 
wholly to his farm. 

He was married, January 27, 1867, to Betsy M. Whitcomb 
of Boxboro, and has had six children: Martha Jane, born 
February 2y, 1869; Marion Maria, born December 25, 1871 ; 
Bertha Luella, born July 21, 1873 ; Bessie Isora, born July 25, 
1881, now Mrs. Veasie, matron of Harvard town farm; Albert 
Henry, born April 7, 1883 ; David Parker, born July 27, 1885. 

Martha Jane married Burpee Steele. She died April 18, 1911, 
of pneumonia, survived by her husband and nine children. Her 



250 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

son, Russell Steele, aged nineteen, died a few hours before his 
mother. 

2d Mass. Heavy Artillery. 

Gardner Milton Dean. 

Mustered in, September 2, 1864. 

Discharged, August 14, 1865. 

Address, Oakham, Mass. 

Born October 23, 1846, in Oakham, son of Luther and Emeline Mariah 
(Crawford) Dean. He traces back his ancestry through both parents to 
the first settlers of Oakham, his father, Luther Dean, being a descendant 
in the third generation of Deacon James Dean, who purchased the 
Dean farm in 1750 and built on it the first frame house in Oakham. His 
mother was granddaughter of Capt. John Crawford, whose father, 
Alexander Crawford, purchased of the Proprietors of Rutland the whole 
of Lot No. 4. James Dean and Alexander Crawford, with eight others, 
were the first settlers of the town. Mr. Dean and Mr, Crawford were 
both officers in the early Presbyterian Church of Oakham. 

Gardner M. Dean enlisted in the summer of 1864, at the age 
of seventeen, in Co. B, 2d Mass. Heavy Artillery, for the town 
of Dracut. January 17, 1865, he was transferred to Co. D of 
the 17th Mass. Infantry. He served in Virginia and North 
Carolina, and was under Sherman in the campaign which 
terminated in the surrender of General Joe Johnston. 

He was a charter member of Co. G, 2d Regt. Mass. Volunteer 
Militia, formed after the war, and a lifelong member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, having served as Adjutant over 
twenty years, besides holding other offices of trust in the order. 
He was one of the original members of the E. K. Wilcox Post 
G. A. R. of Springfield, Mass., his name being twentieth on the 
record. 

After the war, he was for eight years clerk in the dry goods 
stores of H. M. Bowers and of J. N. Hatch & Co. of Boston. 
He was later for several years successfully engaged in the mill- 
ing business in Springfield, Mass. In 1881 he returned to 
Oakham, having purchased the Adin Bullard farm. This he 
has enlarged by the purchase of land adjoining, and has made 



THE CIVIL WAR — 2D MASS, HEAVY ARTILLERY 25 I 

a specialty of fruit and dairy products. Mr. Dean has been a 
very successful town officer, having been Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen for several years. In 1907 he was chosen by the 
town a member of the Building Committee of the Fobes 
Memorial Library, and was made the Treasurer of the Com- 
mittee. In 1912 he was Chairman of the Committee on the 
Celebration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of 
the Incorporation of Oakham. 

He was married, March 10, 1873, to Charlotte Emily Russell, 
daughter of Orlando Russell, and has had seven children: 

Clarence Edgar, born March 5, 1874, married December 20, 
1908, to Gertrude M. Tallis of Bristol, Conn. 

Minnie Gertrude, born August 20, 1875, niarried to Walter 
A. Woodis, August 19, 1897. 

Sidney Irving, born May 4, 1879, married Jessie I. Taylor of 
Rutland, April 3, 1901, and has three children: Ralph Emerson; 
Jessie Mildred; and Sidney Irving, Jr. 

Caroline Melvina, born August 12, 1883, married James 
Packard Fairbank, November 9, 1898, and has one daughter, 
Marion Corinne, born September 26, 1901. 

Three other children, Warren, Mabel, and Emerson, died in 
early life. 

Levi L. Dean. 

Mustered in, January 2, 1864. 
Discharged, September 3, 1865. 

Son of Dr. John and Nancy (Parks) Dean, and brother of Amos B. 
Dean of the 15th Mass., was born in Stonington, Conn., January 21, 1824. 
His father was son of Deacon James Dean, one of the first ten settlers 
of Oakham. His mother, Nancy Parks, was born in Mystic, Conn.. 
February 20, 1796, and died in Hiawatha, Kansas, in 1873. 

Levi L. Dean enlisted at the age of forty in Co. H, 2d Mass. 
Heavy Artillery, from the town of Belchertown, and served till 
the close of the war. 

After the war he resided in Enfield, Mass., where he died in 
December, 1872, of disease contracted in the service. 



252 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

4th Mass. Heavy Artillery. 

Alfred Galen Crawford. 

Mustered in, August 18, 1864. 
Mustered out, June 17, 1865. 

Born March 21, 1847, in Oakham, son of Galen Allen and Alvira 
(Noyes) Crawford. His father, Galen Allen Crawford, was a son of 
Alexander and Bethiah (Willis) Crawford. His mother, Alvira Noyes, 
was daughter of Luther and Azuba (Smith) Noyes. 

Alfred G. Crawford enlisted in the summer of 1864 in Co. D, 
4th Mass. Heavy Artillery, and was stationed at Arlington. 
During the greater part of the time of his service he was detailed 
as a musician. 

He returned to Oakham at the close of the war. In the fol- 
lowing year he located in New York City, where he was 
employed by the Street Railway Company till 1875, when he 
went to Australia with his brother, Hiram A. Crawford, who 
was returning from a visit to America. Soon after his arrival 
there, he was made inspector of a suburban street railway line 
running from Melbourne to Richmond, which position he held 
till his death, in Melbourne, in 1895. 

Isaac Newton Monroe. 

Mustered in, August 22, 1864. 

Discharged, June 17, 1865. 

Address, Coldbrook Springs, Mass. 

Born August 29, 1836, in Lowell, Mass., son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Leathers) Monroe. His parents were born in New Hampshire and 
were of Scotch-Irish descent. His father, Joseph Monroe, died in 
Chester, Penn., in 1872. His mother died in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1909, 
aged ninety-six years. 

I. Newton Monroe enlisted from the city of Worcester, in 
the summer of 1864, at the age of twenty-seven, in Co. D, 4th 
Mass., Heavy Artillery, and served till the close of the war. 

In September, 1865, he came to Coldbrook, where he has 
since resided. For several years he followed his occupation of 



THE CIVIL WAR — 4TH MASS. HEAVY ARTILLERY 253 

powder-keg maker in Coldbrook, and for twenty years he was 
engaged in mercantile business in Gilbertville. 

January 7, 1864, he was married in North Brookfield, Mass., 
to Harriett Harding, daughter of Alpheus and Catherine 
(Wheeler) Harding. Children: 

Charles Newton Monroe, born March 21, 1865, died October 
27, 1898. He was married August 16, 1887, to Catherine Cody. 
A daughter, Beatrice Monroe, was born October 16, 1893. 

Elbert Leroy Monroe, bom February 25, 1869, married Sep- 
tember 4, 1891, to Julia Sullivan. Children: E. Leroy Monroe, 
born December 28, 1894; Harold N. Monroe, born March 17, 
1898; Hazel G. Monroe, born August 25, 1899. Mr. Elbert 
L. Monroe is a street-car conductor in Dorchester. 

Catherine Rowena Monroe, born February 6, 1871, married 
September 6, 1894, to Edmund Cody of Coldbrook. Children: 
B. Evelyn Cody, born June 22, 1895 ; Ralph M. Cody, born 
November 30, 1899; Ivah C. Cody, born November 23, 1902. 

Edmund Cody is a dealer in grain and coal, and has been 
Overseer of the Poor, and Collector of Taxes for the town of 
Oakham. He has held all office seats in the Lodges Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, and Improved Order of Red Men. 



nth Mass. Battery. 
James Griswold Shannon. 

Mustered in, August 25, 1862. 

Mustered out. May 29, 1863. 

Reenlisted, January 2, 1864. 

Discharged, February 22, 1867. 

Born June 17, 1843, in Quincy, Mass., son of James and Lucy (Saville) 
Shannon. 

When the war began he was a druggist's clerk in Boston. 
He enlisted August 19, 1862, in the nth Mass. Battery, and 
served as a private nine months. In January, 1864, he enlisted 
again in the same battery for a term of three years. August 6, 
1864, he was made Hospital Steward, U. S. Army. He served 



2 54 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

in the Hospital Department of the U. S. Army till February, 
1867, when he was discharged with the rank of Lieutenant. 

In 1867 he entered the Medical School of Harvard Univer- 
sity, from which he was graduated as Doctor of Medicine in 
1870. Dr. Shannon came to Oakham June i, 1870, and estab- 
lished himself here as a physician. He was much interested in 
the affairs of the town, and was President of the Soldiers' Union 
for four years. In October, 1876, he removed to Rutland 
where he continued the practice of medicine for about twelve 
years. 

November 26, 1872, he was married to Laura E. Morton, 
daughter of Rev. Alpha Morton, then pastor of the church in 
Oakham. 

Dr. Shannon died in Worcester, Mass., December 29, 1889. 

Mrs. Shannon was again married, October 13, 1906, to S. 
Franklin Keene, and resides in Oxford, Maine. 



60th Mass. Infantry. 

John E. Stone. 

Mustered in, July 20, 1864. 

Mustered out, November 30, 1864. 

Address, Oakham, Mass. 

Born November 16, 1844, in Oakham, son of Washington and Martha 
H. (Robinson) Stone, and brother of George W. Stone of the 25th Mass. 

He enlisted in the summer of 1864 in Co. F of the 60th Mass. 
After his discharge he returned to Oakham and purchased in 
1879, at Ware Corner, the place formerly occupied by William 
Ware, which in 1881 he exchanged for the James B. Ware farm, 
on which he has lived for over thirty years. 

He was married at Brattleboro, Vt., January 28, 1879, to Mary 
Jane Larrabee, daughter of Ira Larrabee of West Halifax, Vt. 
Children, born in Oakham: Grace M., January 23, 1880, died 
August 12, 1880; Eva A., April 29, 1881 ; Ralph E., July 26, 
1884, died November 24, 1885; Ira W., March 20, 1887; Frank 



THE CIVIL WAR — 60TH MASS. INFANTRY 255 

H., November 15, 1894; Gladys M., September 7, 1900; Harold 
J., January 31, 1909. 

Eva A. Stone was married December 8, 1908, to Clayton C. 
Adams of Oakham, a scientific farmer and dealer in cattle. 



William Powers. 

Mustered in, July 20, 1864. 
Mustered out, November 30, 1864. 

William Powers was a Westboro boy and was living with 
Lyman Dean in 1864. He enlisted from Oakham at the age 
of nineteen in Co. F of the 60th Mass. 



6th Unattached Mass. Volunteer Militia. 
Charles Archibald Ware. 

Mustered in, May 4, 1864. 

Mustered out, August 2, 1864. 

Address, 33 Queen St., Worcester, Mass. 

Born December 18, 1846, in Oakham, son of Archibald H. and Caroline 
Cutler (Cooley) Ware, and brother of Edward Franklin Ware of Co. 
F, 15th Mass. His aunt, Lavinia H. Ware, who married Chauncey Colton, 
was the mother of Nathaniel W. Colton of Co. F, loth Mass. 

Charles A. Ware enlisted in the spring of 1864, from the town 
of Westboro, in the 6th Unattached Co, Mass. Volunteer Militia. 
September 2, 1864, he enlisted again, as a contract man in the 
Government employ, and was released May 4, 1865. 

He was married to Almira H. Shedd of North Brookfield, 
November 30, 1866. Children: Edward Hazen, born May 26, 
1872, at Oakham, died September i, 1878; Robert Elwin, born 
June 5, 1881, at Oakham. 

His wife, Almira H. Ware, died March 20, 1900. May 19, 
1900, he was again married to Mrs. Marion F. (Spooner) 
Dayton, daughter of Andrew Spooner of the 51st Mass. 



256 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

ii6th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

James W. Caldwell. 

Mustered in, February 18, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 14, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, February 14, 1836, son of George and Eliza (Parker) 
Caldwell, and brother of George Lyman Caldwell of the 21st Mass. 

James W. Caldwell was in the employ of the Van Amburg 
circus company, which was traveling in Pennsylvania, when at 
the age of twenty-eight he enlisted for three 3^ears in Co. E of 
the ii6th Penn. Inf. After Caldwell joined the regiment, it went 
through the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Cold Harbor, Hatcher's Run, and Petersburg. 

When the war was over he came back to his native town, 
where he worked as a farmer and shoemaker. March 24, 1888, 
he was married to Mrs. Rachel McLoud of Oakham. He suf- 
fered much from rheumatism contracted in the army and always 
used a cane. 

Mr. Caldwell died in Oakham, October 18, 1893. 

2d Michigan Cavalry. 

John Gault Crawford. 

Mustered in, October 2, 1861. 

Resigned his commission, March 31, 1863. 

Address, Manchester, N. H. 

Bom in Oakham, April 21, 1834, son of Hosea Willis and Caroline 
(Gault) Crawford, and brother of Henry Willis Crawford of the 25th 
Mass. Inf., and Charles Sumner Crawford of the 4th Mass. Cav. His 
father, Hosea Willis Crawford, received in 1833 from Governor Levi Lin- 
coln a captain's commission in the Massachusetts militia. He was 
descended from Alexander Crawford, one of the first ten settlers of 
Oakham, through Capt. John Crawford of the Revolutionary Army. 

John G. Crawford's education was obtained chiefly in the 
public schools of Oakham and North Brookfield, and in the 
select schools of Oakham. He developed into a strong debater 



THE CIVIL WAR — 2D MICHIGAN CAVALRY 257 

by constant practice in the Franklin Literary Society, of which 
he became President. He also taught successfully in the public 
schools of Oakham and Wrentham, Mass., and studied law 
in the office of Martin Gorham in Barre. 

In February, 1855, he went to Kansas, where he took an active 
part in the contest over the slavery question, and was with John 
Brown and Jim Lane. He was several times captured by the 
Pro-slavery bands and often in danger of being hung or shot 
by them, but was released on account of his youth, courage, and 
good nature. After the arrival of the United States troops at 
Lawrence, he returned East, bringing with him as his only 
souvenir the following pass, which he still carries, given him 
by "Dick" McCamish: 

"Bull Creek, K. T., June 3, 1856. 

This is to certify that the bearer hereof, John Crawford, is a reliable 
young man, and not injurious to the cause of Pro-slaveryism. 

RICHARD McCAMISH." 

In the spring of 1861 he went to Michigan on a visit. On 
September 2, 1861, he enlisted in the 2d Mich.i Cav., and 
was appointed Sergeant Major. This regiment was commanded 
by Colonel Grainger till his promotion to Brigadier General, 
March 16, 1862, and after that by Colonel Philip H. Sheridan. 
September 9, 1862, Sergeant Crawford was commissioned Sec- 
ond Lieutenant and assigned as Battalion Adjutant. Adjutant 
Crawford went with Sheridan on the first cavalry raid of the 
Civil War and was in many engagements with the enemy before 
he resigned, on account of ill health, in the spring of 1863. 
General Hall of Iowa, who commanded a Brigade in Kentucky 
during the winter of 1862-63, wrote: 

"Lieut. Crawford is a man of sterling integrity, great vigilance and 
bravery, and possesses all the necessary qualifications for further pro- 
motion, and I cheerfully recommend him for promotion." 

He was given a commission of Captain in the lOth Mich. Cav. 
by Governor Blair, and raised a company. Through the influ- 
ence of Senator Sumner, who had known him in the days of 
17 



258 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

the Kansas contest, he was offered a commission of Major in a 
colored regiment; but his health did not allow him to go again 
to the front. 

In 1864 he was elected to the Michigan State Senate and 
served two years, being at the time the youngest member ever 
in that body. He was admitted to practice in Pontiac, Mich., 
in 1865, and in United States courts in Detroit, September 17, 
1867, and was located in Fenton and Holly till 1870, when he 
removed to Lancaster, N. H. In 1881 he was appointed, by 
President Garfield, American Consul at Coaticook, P. Q., and 
served till 1884. After a residence of five years in Worcester, 
Mass., he removed in 1890 to Manchester, where he still resides. 

Comrade Crawford has done much talking during the past 
fifty years. It is said that he has done more campaign speaking 
than any other man in the State of New Hampshire. He has 
spoken in behalf of the Republican candidates in every presi- 
dential campaign, beginning with that of 1856, when Fremont 
and Dayton were the first nominees of the party. In national 
and state canvasses, he has spoken in over one hundred and 
forty different towns in New Hampshire, and has been cam- 
paign speaker in Massachusetts, in Vermont, in Michigan and 
in Kansas. In addition, he has made numerous addresses at 
meetings of the Grand Army, at the dedication of soldiers* 
monuments, and at patriotic gatherings on Memorial Day. 
Several of these addresses have been printed. He has also been 
a popular lecturer on temperance and on many other subjects. 
Agriculture has claimed enough of his attention to enable him 
to serve as clerk and President of the Coos and Essex Agri- 
cultural Society. By using spare moments, he has found time 
to make a thorough study of subjects outside his profession, 
and has published important articles, among which may be 
mentioned three in Vol. I of the Collections of the Manchester 
Historic Association, "Castle William and Mary," pp. 51-65; 
"Etymology of the Language of the Indians of New Hamp- 
shire," pp. 177-188; "Proclamation Money," pp. 212-216. 

He was married, April 16, 1863, to Emma Tindall of Oxford, 
Mich., by whom he had one child: Emma Nita, born August 



THE CIVIL WAR — 2D MICHIGAN CAVALRY 259 

27, 1864, died April i, 1866. His wife died June 23, 1866, and 
he was again married, June 30, 1867, at Buffalo, N. Y., to Abbie 
T. Stevens o£ Paris, Me., daughter of Simon Stevens, a descend- 
ant of Captain Phineas Stevens, who defended No. 4 against 
the Indian attack upon Charlestown, N. li. Two children were 
born of this marriage: 

Cyrene S., September i, 1868, died March 26, 1874. 

Carrie E., September 30, 1870, married April 30, 1898, to John 
W. Chapman of Manchester. Children: Mirriam Stevens, bom 
December 22, 1899 ; Perley Crawford, born March 22, 1901 ; 
John Wilbert, born March 7, 1903 ; Sara Rena, born July 9, 
1904 ; Carrol Everett, born October 29, 1905 ; Carrie Ethelyne, 
born December 17, 1907. 

Mrs. Abbie Stevens Crawford died February 2, 1882, and 
he was married April 30, 1885, to Mary A. Harrington of 
Worcester, Mass. 

A son, Harry Calvin Crawford, was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in 1909, with the degree of Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine. He is a member of the American Veter- 
inary Medical Association, and is in successful practice in 
New York City. 



38th Iowa Infantry. 
George Duffey. 

Mustered in, October i, 1862. 
Mustered out, August 13, 1865. 

Bom June 9, 1826, in Rochdale, Lancashire, England, son of Peter 
Duffey. His mother's maiden name was Mary Crossley. 

George Duffey came to this country about 1850 and lived for 
a short time in Smithville, Mass., now called White Valley. 
He moved west before 1857 and settled on a farm in New 
Oregon, Iowa, from which town he enlisted, August 22, 1862, 
in the 38th Iowa Regiment, Co. I. 



26o SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

After the war he returned to New Oregon, where he con- 
tinued to reside till 1885, when he removed to Oakham and 
bought the place on which Stephen Boyden had lived for twenty 
years. 

He was married in May, 1845, to Sarah A. Wilson of Oldham, 
England, and had five children: James, born in England, June 
17, 1846; Mary Ann, born in Smithville, April 13, 1852; Lizzie 
E., born in New Oregon, October 9, 1857; Florence N., born 
in New Oregon, April 10, 1862; Ida Eveline, born in New 
Oregon, June 29, 1869. 

Mr. Duffey died in Oakham, November 6, 1907. 



6th Vermont Infantry. 

George E. Green. 

Mustered in, July 24, 1863. 
Mustered out at the close of the war. 
Address, Monument, Hinsdale, N. H. 

Born March 5, 1829, in Oakham. His father, Charles Belcher Green, 
son of Elijah Green, was born at Stockbridge, Vt., August 2, 1803. His 
mother was Catherine Bryant of Orange, Mass. They were married 
April 29, 1828. 

George E. Green removed from Oakham to North Brook- 
field about 1850, and later to Brattleboro, Vt., where he was 
living at the beginning of the war. He enlisted July 13, 1863, 
in Co. A, 6th Vt. Inf., and served in the Shenandoah Valley 
and in the Army of the Potomac from the Wilderness to 
Petersburg. 

After the war he returned to Brattleboro, where he lived 
till 1886, when he removed to Hinsdale, a town across the 
river in New Hampshire. He has a farm about two miles from 
Brattleboro, and is engaged in market gardening. 

He was married, October 25, 1856, to Helen S. F. Barrett of 
Hinsdale, N. H. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 1ST VERMONT CAVALRY 261 

I St Vermont Cavalry. 
George W. Haskell. 

Mustered in, November 19, 1861. 

Reenlisted, December 30, 1863. 

Died in the service. 

Born in Oakham, April 22, 1838, son of Nelson and Philena (Pep- 
per) Haskell. His grandfather, Simeon Haskell, a farmer and blacksmith, 
son of Roger and Judith Haskell, was born in Middleboro, Mass., January 
10, 1767, removed to North Brookfield about 1793, and came from North 
Brookfield to Oakham in 1804. He lived on the Belknap place and was 
a prominent citizen, having been five times Selectman. Nelson Haskell 
was born in North Brookfield, March 19, 1798. On April 29, 1830, he 
was married to Philena Pepper, daughter of John Pepper of Ware, and 
sister of Mrs. Thomas Haskell. Other sons of Simeon Haskell were 
Loring, Thomas, and Mark. 

George W. Haskell was in the employ of Deacon Hartshorn, 
a farmer of Worcester, when the war broke out. On November 
6, 1861, he enHsted in Co. F, ist Vt. Cav., which did heroic 
service in Virginia. Adjutant General P. G. Washburn of 
Vermont said of the men in this regiment: "Dashing, daring, 
fearless men, accustomed to be almost constantly in the saddle, 
and to charge the enemy wherever seen, without much regard 
to the odds, they have fought their way to a reputation which 
entitles them to all the consideration which can be given them." 

George W. Haskell died in the hospital at Washington, D. C, 
August 8, 1864, of wounds received in action, June i, 1864, 
at Ashland, Va. 

Contract Service. 
Frank Eugene Loring. 

Address, Oakham, Mass. 

Born in Oakham, January 17, 1844, son of Augustine and Elizabeth R. 
Loring. His mother was Elizabeth Moore of Rutland. His father, who 
was born October 11, 1804, and came to Oakham from Spencer, was the 
son of Thomas and Chloe (Draper) Loring, who were married September 
27, 1803. 



262 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

Frank E. Loring' enlisted in 1862 in a German regiment in 
Pontiac, 111., but did not pass the examination. In 1865 he 
enlisted as a workman in the Quartermaster's Department, 
under Captain and Assistant Quartermaster J^ S. Godfrey. He 
was stationed on Lookout Mountain, had charge of the Sadlery 
Department, and by contract was liable to be called on to fight 
in the trenches in case of an attack. Shortly before the close 
of the war he received the following discharge: 

"This is to certify that the bearer hereof, Frank E. Loring, has been 
in the employ of the Quartermaster's Department under my direction, and 
has been honorably discharged this 13th day of May, 1865. 

J. S. GODFREY, 

Capt. & A.Q.M." 

Since the war he has resided chiefly in Oakham, where he has 
had a machine shop and has sold and repaired all kinds of farm- 
ing and household machinery. The work was carried on under 
the firm name of Loring Brothers till the death of his brother, 
Arthur L. Loring, February 7, 1896. Since that date he has 
continued the business alone. 



2d Ohio Heavy Artillery. 

Abraham Fay Robinson. 

Enlisted, January 5, 1864. 
Mustered out, June 8, 1865. 

Born in Oakham, November 13, 1830. His father. Col. John Robinson, 
was son of John Robinson of Northboro, who removed from that town 
to Oakham about 1790 and purchased the farm on which George W. 
Stone, his descendant in the fourth generation, still lives. His mother, 
Susan (Stone) Robinson, was daughter of Alpheus Stone, a soldier in the 
Continental Army. 

Abraham F. Robinson received his education in the district 
and select schools of Oakham and went west in 1856. At the 
outbreak of the war he was living in Newark, Ohio, from which 
place he enlisted in Co. M, 2d Ohio Heavy Artillery. The regi- 



THE CIVIL WAR — 2D OHIO HEAVY ARTILLERY 263 

ment was assigned to the duty of holding forts, protecting 
quartermasters' stores, guarding military prisoners, and policing 
the railroad from Chattanooga to Knoxville. Mr. Robinson 
was a fine penman and a skillful accountant, and was detailed 
for clerical duty for the greater part of the time of his service, 
first in Camp Nelson at Nicholasville, a few miles south of 
Lexington, Ky., where Confederate prisoners were kept, and 
later at the office of the Medical Director at Knoxville. He 
was discharged with the regiment at the close of the war. 

He learned the machinist's trade by instruction extending over 
four years, two in Worcester and two in Newark. After return- 
ing from the war, he worked at his trade till he was about fifty 
years of age, when he left the shop for a farm at Newark, Ohio. 
He removed in 1892 to Utica, Ohio, where he resided till his 
death, December 5, 1912. 

He was twice married: (i) to Mary A. Ball, April 8, i860, 
who died in May, 1881 ; (2) to Lydia A. Young, February 16, 
1882. He had eight children: Mary Geneva, born June 4, 1861, 
died January 10, 1868; John W., born December 29, 1862, died 
December 30, 1862; Hattie S., born December 3, 1882; Bertha 
E., born January 18, 1884; Susan M., born September 4, 1885; 
Charles F., born January 29, 1887; Carl D., born March 21, 
1890 ; Walter M., born August 6, 1892. 

Hattie S. was married November 11, 1905, to Stewart B. 
Caifee. 

Bertha E. was married August 11, 1913, to Dan Solenbarger. 

Susan M. was married August 20, 1908, to RoUin Kunze. 
Children: Ralph Glen, born December 2, 1909, died same day; 
Irma Imogene, born March 4, 1911. 

Charles F. was married April 26, 1906, to Mary M. Ogle. 
Children : Beauf ord F., born June 27, 1906 ; Letha Hazel, born 
December 20, 1909. 

Mrs. Lydia Young Robinson resides at Utica, Ohio. Post 
Office address, Box 115. 



264 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

SUMMARY 

This book contains biographical sketches of ninety-six soldiers 
in the Civil War who were bom in Oakham or who lived here 
for a considerable part of their lives before or after the war. 
Of this number, twenty-seven are still living (1913) at the end 
of a half century. 

Thirty were married before enlistment and thirty-eight after 
their return. Twelve were married twice and one three times. 
Thirteen of those who came back from the war were never 
married. The average number of children in the families of the 
sixty-eight who were married was 3.62. 

A large proportion of these soldiers were mature men. Twenty- 
two were above thirty years of age at the time of enlistment, 
eleven above thirty-five, and four above forty, while only 
twenty-three were below twenty. Thirty-four, more than one- 
third, were between twenty and twenty-five. The average age 
of those who enlisted from Oakham was about twenty-four 
years. 

During the Revolutionary War the military age was from six- 
teen to sixty, but boys under sixteen and men above sixty were 
accepted as soldiers. The population of Oakham in 1776 was 
five hundred and ninety-eight, and the number of males between 
the ages of sixteen and sixty could not have been much if any 
less than one hundred and sixty. At the time of the Civil War, 
the military age was between eighteen and forty-five. The 
population of Oakham in i860 was nine hundred and fifty-nine. 
The number of males between the ages of fifteen and fifty was 
two hundred and twenty-seven, and the number between eighteen 
and forty-five was about one hundred and seventy-five. The 
number of men of military age in Oakham on the Provost 
Marshal's list dated November 23, 1863, not including thirty-eight 
soldiers already in the field, was one hundred and eighteen. On 
this list were several names of men not liable to military duty 
on account of permanent physical disability. Only five of the 
one hundred and eighteen on the list entered the army after that 
enrollment was made. 



THE CIVIL WAR — SUMMARY 265 

It would be difficult to find an able-bodied man in Oakham at 
the time of the Revolution who did not go on some campaign, 
and there were very few men of military age at this period who 
could claim exemption on ground of physical disability. But 
the soldiers from this town in the Civil War were supplied by 
a comparatively small number of families. Seven of the Civil 
War soldiers whose biographies are given in this book came to 
Oakham after the war, and eighty-nine were representatives of 
Oakham families, though twenty-seven of these enlisted from 
other towns. According to the state census, the number of 
families in Oakham in i860 was two hundred and twenty-two. 
If men who reenlisted are counted twice, as they were on the 
quota, it will be found that twenty-three Oakham families fur- 
nished sixty-five soldiers to the Union army, from this and other 
towns. Twelve families sent two brothers each, four sent three 
each, and one sent five; forty-one men in all. Twelve of 
these soldiers reenlisted, increasing the number to fifty-three 
from seventeen families. The sons of six other families reen- 
listed and were counted as twelve, bringing the whole number 
of soldiers from these twenty-three families up to sixty-five 
on the official list. 

Sixteen Oakham families whose sons enlisted for their own 
town furnished one-half of the Oakham quota of ninety men. 
Eight families sent two brothers each, two sent three each, 
and one sent five; twenty-seven men in all. Eight of these 
reenlisted for the town of Oakham, increasing the number to 
thirty-five from these eleven families. Five other families sent 
sons who reenlisted and were counted as ten, bringing the whole 
number of soldiers furnished by these sixteen families up to 
forty-five on the official list. The Oakham men who enlisted 
for their own town all came from forty-four families. 

That Oakham sent its best young men to the Civil War is 
beyond question. Ten of the soldiers had been teachers before 
enhstment, and eight received before or after their military 
service a college or professional training. Two became success- 
ful lawyers, one became a minister in the Congregational Church, 
one a physician, one a dentist, and one a professor in a large 



266 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

university. Five served in the upper or lower house of state 
legislatures, and one was United States Consul in a Canadian 
city. More than one-third of those who survived the war have 
held important offices in the cities or towns where they have 
resided. 

Mr. Peloubet's words to the soldiers of Oakham, at the 
reception given them on their return, have already been quoted 
on page 12 : 

"So far as we can learn, you have to a man returned at least as good 
as you went away, and many we know, and all we hope, a great deal 
better. Many backsliders were made in the army, but not one hails 
from Oakham ; there were cowards, but none were nurtured among these 
hills; there were deserters, but no Oakham man failed in the hour 
of trial." 

In reply to a circular letter from Adjutant General Schouler 
dated December 9, 1865, Moses O. Ayres, Chairman of the 
Selectmen, wrote: 

"All our brave fellows on returning from the war have entered at once 
upon the peaceful employments of life, and feel a just pride in the part 
they have borne in subduing a wicked rebellion. I think I am safe in 
saying that not one has suffered in his moral or religious character by 
the service he has rendered his country." 

Sergeant White's words in praise of the Oakham soldiers in 
the 25th Regiment might have been said of the men from the 
town in the other regiments: 

"They were equal to the best in all respects. No better lot of men 
ever wore the Union Blue. The most of them were of the very highest 
standard of moral and physical worth; the most of them religious in 
the best sense. Not a man of them failed to do his full duty, and to 
maintain the best traditions of New England manhood." 

The following citizens held the important town offices during 
the Civil War : 

Selectmen : 

Alexander Crawford, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864. 
Washington Stone, 1861, 1862. 
Page Austin, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864. 
James Packard, 1863, 1864. 



THE CIVIL WAR — SUMMARY 267 

Treasurers : 

Washington Stone, 1861, 1862. 
James C. Bemis, 1863, 1864. 

Town Clerk : 

Mark Haskell, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864. 

Alexander Crawford was Chairman of the Selectmen during 
the four years of the war. Washington Stone was Selectman, 
Treasurer and Collector till his death in 1862, when James 
Packard was elected Selectman in his place, and James C. Bemis, 
Treasurer and Collector. 



ADDENDA. 



The Addenda include exact copies of several manuscripts of historic 
value discovered, after this book was in type, in the possession of Miss 
Mary A. French of North Brookfield, Mass. The Roll of Captain Abner 
How's company is one of the supposedly lost Revolutionary Pay Rolls 
of the year 1776 (M. S. R., i, p. V). The affidavits, taken over half a 
century later at the time of Lieut. French's application for a pension, 
reveal how the Pay Roll came to be in the possession of the descendants 
of Second Lieut. Asa French, rather than in that of the families of 
Captain How or of First Lieut. Packard. They also add new facts 
of interest regarding the campaigns of the years 1775, 1776 and I777- 
Great care has been taken in the transcribing and analysis of the 
documents. On page 277 will be found a summary of the new material 
which the Pay Roll adds to what had already been published in Massa- 
chusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolution. Through the gift of 
Miss French, this Pay Roll is now in the possession of the Oakham 
Historical SocietJ^ 

The connection of John French, 2d, with Oakham was not established 
till after the discovery of the documents. His name adds one more to 
the list of Oakham men who served as soldiers in the Revolution, and 
his biography is given on pages 278 and 279. 



CAPTAIN ABNER HOW'S COMPANY 



Lt Asa French 

Statement 



I Asa French now a resident in Oakham in the County of Worcester 
and State of Massachusetts aged ninty one years old the 28. day of 
October last past, I was born in the Town of Bartly [Berkley] in the 
County of Bristol in the State of Massachusetts the 28. day of October 
in the year AD 1740 — my Father moved into Middelborough in the 
County of Plymouth when I was in the tinth year of my age and I 
lived ther till the year 1769 then I moved into the town of Oakham in 
the County of Worester and State aforesaid where I now live and 
have lived ever since I moved there, — I further state that Joshua Turner 
a boye about six years of his age was given to me by his mother a sister 
of mine to bring up till he was twenty one years old, in the year one 
Thousand seven hundred and seventy five in Apl a War tuck place 
betwen old ingland and the United States of America, the newes came 
that the British troops had marched out of Boston to Lexington and had 
kiled a number of amaracans and we wer Colled upon in Oakham, the 
Cap*^ told me I must go or let my yong man go according to his orders 
I let Joshua Turner go for eight monthes (about in Dec^ the same year 
sum of the men wer wanted to Stay one month longer) [this sentence 
in parenthesis is crossed out in the original. H. P. W.] he enlisted in 
Cap*^ Hazeltons Comp^ in Col° Fellowes Reg* I furnished the said Turner 
with Armes Aquipments Blanket and Cloathing who was then in the 
ninteenth year of his age and he marched of with the Comp^ to Rox- 
bury the town next to Boston, in December the same year 1775, the 
same Joshua Turner enlisted in Cap*^ Barnes Comp^ in Col° Wards Reg* 
for one Month. 

I Asa French do further stat that I was a Lieu* in Cap* John Crawfords 
Compy in Col° James Conveses Reg* in the month of September in the 
year 1776. I was Caled upon by the Agitent of Col° Conveses Reg* to 
march to Brookfield and Joine Cap* Abner Hows Comp/ and march to 
the State of New York according to orders I marched through Newhaven 
in the state of Connecticut, to the State of New York in Col° Conveses 
Reg*, under the emmediate Command of Gen^ Starks, and was discharged 
at white Planes in November was there two Months and allowed nine 
days to march home 



272 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

I also state in the month of Sep* in the year 1777 I was informed 
that Gen^ Brogoine was marching through the Country to Albany and I 
was informed that Gen^ Gates wanted more men and Cap* Crawford 
being gon to the Armey for three monthes, I volenteared and called for 
men to turn out and about twenty of the most respectable men in the 
town of Oakham turned out and volenteared with me and marched with 
me through Benington in the State of Vermont to Still Water and Joined 
Cap* Cutler's Compy in Col" Stones Reg* in Gen^ Felloses Brigade, we 
marched of the 14 day of Sep* and ware dismised at fort Edward the 18 
day of Ocf^ and ware allowed seven day to march home. 

I did not searve at one time long-enougt to intitle me to a pention in 
the pres t pention Law. 

John Forbes 

Afadavit 

FOR Asa French 



I John Forbes of Oakham in the County of Worcester and State of 
Massachusetts of lawful age do testifj' and say that I know one Asa 
French now of Oakham in the County of Worcester and State of Massa- 
chusetts and that I knew the same Asa French in the year one Thousand 
seven hundred and seventy six, and that he searved as the second Lieu* 
with me two monthes and nine days in the Revolution War in Cap* Abner 
Hows Comp y in Col° James Conveses Reg* in the State of New York, 
Cap* How and L* Packard ware both taken sick and left the armey and 
the Command of said Company devolved on Lieu* French, further your 
deponant saith not 

John Forbes 

Worcester Ss. Oakham August 18, 1832 — 

Personally appeared John Forbes, subscriber to the above declaration, 
and made Oath in due form of law to the truth of the same, before me 

Skelton Felton Jus. of the Peace. 
John Boyd to A French 



I John Boyd of Oakham in the County of Worcester and State of 
Massachusetts of lawful age do testify and say that I knew one Asa 
French in the year 1770. I also knew one Joshua Turner a miner to 
the said Asa French both then of Oakham and state aforesaid, in the 
year 1775 a war tuck place in the united States and the said Joshua 



CAPTAIN ABNER HOW'S COMPANY 273 

Turner enlisted in Cap* Hazelton Compy in Col° Fellowes Reg' for 
eight months and marched to Roxbury and there searved eight monthes. 
for the aforesaid Asa French— in Sep' 1777 we received newes that Gen' 
Bruguine was marching throug the Cuntry there was a call for men 
Asa French then being Lieu' Volentered and a number of other with 
him and marched with him to Saratoga. 

John Boyd. 

Worcester Ss. Oakham August 15, 1832 

Personally appeared John Boyd Subscriber to the above declaration 
and made Oath in due form of law to the truth of the same — before me — 

Skelton Felton Jus. of the. Peace 
Win Coldwell for Asa French 



I William Caldwell of Oakham in the County of Worcester and State 
of Massachusetts of lawful age do testify and say that I knew one Asa 
French in the year 1770 I also knew one Joshua Turner a miner under 
the said Asa French both then of Oakham and state aforesaid in the 
year 1775. a War tuck place in the United States and the said Joshua 
Turner enlisted in Cap*^ Hazeltons Comp^ in Col° Fellowses Reg*^ for 
eight monthes and marched to Roxbury and searved eight monthes for 
Asa French — in the year 1776, I further state that I knew the same 
Asa French then a Lieu*, to searve two month and nine dayes in Cap*' 
Hows. Compy. in Col° Conveses Reg*^ in the Revolution War in the 
State of New York — I further state that in the month of Sep*^ 1777- 
we received newes that Gen' Burgoin was marching through the Cuntry 
there was a call for men Asa French then being Lieu* Volentered and a 
number of others with him and marched with him to Sarratoga. 

William Caldwell 

Worcester Ss. Oakham August 18, 1832. — 

Personally appeared William Caldwell, Subscriber to the above declara- 
tion, and made Oath in due form of law, to the truth of the same, 

before me — 

Skelton Felton Jus. of the Peace. 



18 



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276 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



A Pay abstract of Cap^ How Company 



Rank 


Time of 
Service 


Establishment 
p' month 




M D 


;£ S D 


I Cap' 
I Lu' 

1 Dito 
4 Serg' 

2 Corp' 
I Ditto 

1 Do 

8 privets 
32 Ditto 

2 Dito 
2 Ditto 
I Ditto 
I Ditto 
I Ditto 
I Ditto 


2 6 

2 6 

2 7 

2 6 

2 7 

2 6 

2 3 

2 7 

2 6 

I II 

2 3 

2 I 

I — 15 
I — 14 

2 2 


8—0 

5-8 

5-S 

2—8 

2 4 
2 4 
2—4 



















Whole Amount 



S 



17 — 12 — O 
II — 17 — 6 
12 — I — I 
21 — 2 — 

9—16—5 
4— lb— 9 
4— 12— 4>^ 
35—14—8 
140 — 16 — 

5— 9—4 
8— 8— 
4— 1—4 

3— o— 
2—18—8 

4— 2—8 

286— s—gyi 



true Coppy attest 



Asa French 

Comadand of Cap' Howrs Compy. 



CAPTAIN ABNER HOW's COMPANY 277 

Of the fifty-nine men whose names are on the pay roll only three, the 
commissioned officers Abner How, Joseph Packerd and Asa French, are 
credited with this campaign in M. S. R. 

Ten names, those of Enoch Boutwel, William Boman, Jacob Brooks, 
Roger Bruce, Thomas Burnet, Joseph Hatfield, Theophulas Pother, Samuel 
Slayton, Robert Stevenson and Ezra Torry, are entirely new, not appear- 
ing under any form or spelling in M. S. R. but all of these names except 
two, Jacob Brooks and Thomas Burnet, appear in the Brookfield Vital 
Records of the Revolutionary period. The name of Jacob Brooks is on 
the Oakham Town Records. Robert Stevenson appears to have been 
living in Oakham in 1775 (Brookfield V. R., 415, Oakham V. R., 100). 

Of the remaining forty-six names, eighteen appear in M. S. R. as 
those of Brookfield men, credited with service either before or after 
1776 : Jesse Abbot, Joel Abbot, Eleazer Addams, Jesse Addams, Solomon 
Barns, Elisha Bartlet, William Deen, Henery Gilbert, Jude Hamilton, 
Ephraim Harington, Moses Hastings, Thomas Hathaway, Jonathan Lam- 
son, Joseph Marble, Samuel Watson, Thomas Wedge, Israil Whitney 
and John Woolcut. Ten others can be easily identified by entries in 
A/. 5". R., as those of men who were connected either before or after- 
wards with Brookfield companies : John Cambel, Lemuel Gilbert, Sam- 
uel Hinkly, Nicholas McCluer, Jonathan Richardson, Silas Stone, Joshua 
Tylor, Samuel Walker, Samuel Wood and William Wood. 

Three names appear in M. S. R. as those of Oakham men credited with 
service before or after 1776: Siles Bullard, James Forbush and Samuel 
Medcalf. Five other men whose names appear in M. S. R. for earlier or 
later campaigns unassigned to any town are known from the Oakham 
Town Records to have been from Oakham : Abraham Bell, James Bell, 
William Bothwel, Nathan Edson and John Forbush. 

John Ayres appears in M. S. R. for earlier or later campaigns from New 
Braintree, Samuel Ball from Worcester, Asa Barns from Lanesborough, 
Comfort Barns from New Ashford, Lemuel Bryant from Middleboro, 
Ebenezer Goodail from Royalston, Benjamin Knights and Samuel Palmer 
from Essex Co., and Ebenezer Wright from Templeton. 

Nathan Rude, who was reported on the pay roll as deceased November 
13, is probably the Nathan Rood of Brookfield (Brookfield V. R., 392, 
401) who married Rachel Streeter in 1770. 

The eleven Oakham men on the roll, Abraham Bell, James Bell, Jr., 
William Bothwell, Jacob Brooks, Silas Bullard, Nathan Edson, James 
Forbes, John Forbes, Asa French, Benjamin Knight, and Samuel Metcalf, 
are easily identified, being the only men credited with 178 miles distance 
from home. All of these except Nathan Edson and James Forbes are 
credited with this campaign on the Oakham Town Records. James 
Forbes probably went in place of Ichabod Packard, the only man whose 
name appears on the Town Records and not on the pay roll. 



278 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

John French, 2d. 

Born in Berkley, Mass., August ii, 1735, son of John and Marcy 
French, brother of Lieut. Asa French, and descendant in the fifth gen- 
eration of John French of Halsted, Essex Co., England, who settled in 
Cambridge, Mass., about 1637. 

He served as a private from the towns of Berkley and Middle- 
boro, in probably eight campaigns: (i) in November, 1776, in 
Capt. Joshua Wilbore's Co., Col. Ebenezer Francis' Regt. ; (2) 
from December 8, 1776, twelve days on a Rhode Island alarm, in 
Capt. Joseph Burt's Co., Col. Edward Pope's (Bristol Co.) Regt.; 

(3) from October 2, 1777, twenty-nine days on an expedition to 
Rhode Island, in Capt. James Briggs' Co., Col. Freeman's Regt. ; 

(4) from January 10, 1778, two months twenty-three days in 
Rhode Island, in Capt. James Nichols' Co., of Col. John Daggett's 
Regt.; (5) May 6-9, 1778, on an alarm at Dartmouth, in Capt. 
John Barrows' Co., Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Regt. ; (6) August 
25 to September i, 1778, nine days in Rhode Island, in Capt. 
Ebenezer PauU's Co., Col. John Daggett's Regt. ; (7) September 
6-12, 1778, on an alarm at Dartmouth, in Capt. John Barrows' 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Regt. ; (8) on the Rhode Island 
alarm of August i, 1780, nine days in Capt. Abner Bourn's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer White's Regt. 

John French, 2d, came to Oakham from Middleboro about 
1792 bringing with him his father John French, then over ninety 
years of age. He lived on the Cheney Adams place till 1809 when 
he sold his farm to his son Isaac and afterwards removed to 
Stockbridge, Vt. Both he and his wife probably returned to 
Oakham before the end of the year 1816. 

He was married July 24, 1766, to Hayden Shaw of Middle- 
boro and had nine children, all born in Middleboro: Rhoda, 
August 23, 1767, married Benjamin Green of Oakham in 1793 ; 
Hannah H., August 19, 1769, married Zenas Ripley of Oakham 
in 1805; Betsey, August 31, 1771, married her cousin John 
French, 3d, of Oakham, April 25, 1804; Nancy, July 6, 1773, 
married Woodward Berry of Stockbridge, Vt, in February, 1801 ; 
Isaac, June i, 1775 ; Philena, March 5, 1777, married Alvin Lyon 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 279 

of Braintree, Vt., January 20, 1807; Abigail (Nabby), March 6, 
1779, married Arunah Gilbert of Stockb ridge, Vt., January 29, 
1800; Sarah, May 25, 1781, died November 4, 1783; Sarah 
Eaton, July 9, 1785, married Alvin Lyon of Braintree, Vt., 
February 11, 1821. Mrs. Hayden (Shaw) French died July 18, 
1787, and John French, 2d, was again married in 1797 to Patty 
Fitch of New Braintree. 

Isaac French, only son of John French, 2d, married Catherine 
Davis of Oakham, January 14, 1808. Children born in Oakham: 
Charles, February 3, 181 1, a lumber merchant in« Cleveland, in 
whose honor French Hall on the Oberlin campus was named; 
Nancy Davis, August 10, 1813, married Samuel G. Henry; 
Edwin, June 18, 18 17, who laid out the towns of Tippecanoe 
and Lancaster, Missouri, and was the first Representative of his 
county in the Missouri Legislature; Caroline Denny and Cath- 
erine Davis, twins, August 17, 1819. 

John French, 2d, died at Oakham, September 11, 1823. His 
wife Patty (Fitch) French died, also at Oakham, July 2, 1836. 

Oakham V. R., 27, yz [Frinch], 120. M. S. R., vi, 75 (iS), 17 (5). 
78 (3). Transcript of the Berkley Town Records in the possession of 
Miss Charlotte Crane, Taunton, Mass. French Family Records in the 
possession of Miss Mary A. French, North Brookfield, Mass. Wore. Co. 
Reg. of Deeds, cxxix, 442, clxxx, 243, cciv, 454 Bass, Hist, of Braintree, 
Vt, 163. Wright, John French, Jr., of Taunton, Berkley, Middleboro and 
Oakham, Mass., and his Descendants. [The two different dates of John 
French's marriage given here and on page 88 are explained by different 
interpretations of the note of his marriage in the Middleboro town rec- 
ords. See Wright, John French, Jr., p. 8, «.] 




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282 SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 

33d Iowa Infantry. 

John Rice Crawford. 

Mustered in, September 6, 1862. 
Mustered out, July 17, 1865. 

Son of John and Sally (Moore) Crawford, was born in Rutland, Mass., 
September 29, 1833. His father, John Crawford, was son of Samuel and 
Huldah (Berden) Crawford, who were married in 1793. This Samuel 
was the son of Capt. John Crawford who served in the Revolutionary 
War. Sally Moore was the daughter of William and Sally (Rice) Moore, 
of Rutland, who were married May 8, 1803. 

John R. Crawford came to Oakham with his parents when 
about one year old, and lived in Oakham till the age of twenty, 
when he removed to Spring^eld, Mass., and later went West. 
About 1859 he settled in Marshalltown, Iowa, where he had a 
general store. In the summer of 1862 he joined Co. D of the 
33d Iowa Infantry, and was appointed Second Sergeant. Accord- 
ing to the Adjutant General's Report he enlisted from Oska- 
loosa, Mahaska Co., and his enhstment papers were dated 
September 6, 1862. He was promoted to Sergeant Major, April 
16, 1863. The regiment was sent to Arkansas. In the battle 
at Jenkin's Ferry, on April 30, 1864, Crawford was severely 
wounded in the thigh, and left on the field by his own men. 
He was taken prisoner by the Confederates, and transferred to 
New Orleans, where he was exchanged not long before the close 
of the war. The regiment was mustered out at New Orleans, 
July 17, 1865, and officers not accounted for were mustered out 
as with the regiment. 

After his discharge he returned North and located as a dentist 
in Davenport, Iowa. Later he removed to Nyack, N. Y., where 
he continued the practice of dentistry. 

He was married at Nyack to Sarah Andrews of that place, 
and had one son, John Andrews Crawford, who was a musician. 

John Rice Crawford never fully recovered from his wound. 
He died at Haverstraw, N. Y., February 21, 1892, in the fifty- 
ninth year of his age. 



THE CIVIL WAR — 33D IOWA INFANTRY 283 

Mr. Crawford's military record was not known to the writer 
till the part of this book dealing with the Civil War had been 
printed. Another name is now to be added to the list of descend- 
ants of Capt. John Crawford born or brought up in Oakham 
who served in the Civil War. See page 71. 



INDEX 



The General Index contains all names of Oakham soldiers, and of 
such ancestors and descendants of the same as are mentioned in this 
book; also the Regiments and Companies in which Revolutionary soldiers 
from the town served, arranged alphabetically by the names of their 
Colonels and Captains, under the general headings : Regiments in the 
Revolutionary War, and Companies in the Revolutionary War. The 
names of soldiers whose biographies are given, and the pages on which 
they are to be found, are indicated by full-faced type. 

Following the General Index is a separate Index of Towns. 



GENERAL INDEX 



PAGE 

Abbott, Jesse 274, 277 

Abbott, Joel 274, 277 

Abbreviations 34 

Adams. See also Addams. 

Adams, Austin 140 

Adams, Dr. Charles 142, 189, 

200, 231 
Adams, Charles (son of above) 232 

Adams, Charles H 209 

Adams, Charlotte 189, 232 

Adams, Clayton C 255 

Adams, Ella D. (Green) 209 

Adams, Eva A. (Stone) 255 

Adams, Henry 231 

Adams, Ignatos 31 

Adams, Jacob 22, 27, 29, 30, 31, 35, 

55, 119 

Adams, John (of '12) 160, 281 

Adams, John 231-232 

Adams, Lydia (Mrs. Jacob) . . 35 
Adams, Marietta (Pierce) ... 232 

Adams, Nathan 27, 35-36 

Adams, Nathan (of Medway) 36 

Adams, Sally 196, 222, 241 

Adams, Sarah (McAllister) 189, 231 

Adams, Susanna 94 

Addams. See Adams. 

Addams, Eleazer 274, 277 

Addams, Jesse 274, 277 

Alden, John 36 

Alden, Nathaniel Butler 36 

Alden, Prudence (Butler) .... 36 
Allen, Abiah (wife of Andrew) 139 
Allen, Abigail (daughter of 

James) 165 

Allen, Abigail (daughter of 

Jesse) Z7 

Allen, Abigail (Willis) 37, 164 

Allen, Amy Ann 228 

Allen, Andrew I39 

Allen, Bethiah 46 

Allen, Chloe 37 

Allen, Emily Kimball 165 

Allen, Ephraim 80 

Allen, George 165 

Allen, Hannah 37 

Allen, Hannah H. (Parker) 37, 165 

Allen, Hannah Merriam 165 

Allen, James (father of Jesse) 36, 

46 



PAGE 

Allen, James Z7, 106, 158, 160, 164-5, 

280, 281 
Allen, James (son of James) . . 165 
Allen, Jesse 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 2Z, 

36-37, 38, 46, 115, 116, 120, 128, 

139, 162, 164, 196, 215 
Allen, Jesse (son of James) . . 165 

Allen, Louisa 165 

Allen, Louisa Parker 165 

Allen, Lucinda 27 

Allen, Lucy (daughter of Jesse) 37 
Allen, Lucy (daughter of 

James) 165 

Allen, Maria 165 

Allen, Martha Bird 165 

Allen, Mary (Bothwell) 38, 50 

Allen, Mary L 165 

Allen, Mehitabel 139 

Allen, Nathaniel 36 

Allen, Nehemiah, Jr. 29, 32, 37-38, 

50 
Allen, Nehemiah, Sr. 31, 37, 38, 40, 

66 

Allen, Olive 37 

Allen, Parnal Z7, 116, 166 

Allen, Polly L. (Crocker) . .37, 165 

Allen, Ruth 120 

Allen, Salome 150 

Allen, Samuel 36 

Allen, Stoughton Willis 165 

Allen, Susanna (daughter of 

Nehemiah, Sr.) 66 

Allen, Susanna (daughter of 

Ephraim) 80 

Allen, Thomas 57 

Ames, Abner Craft 39 

Ames, David 69 

Ames, Elizabeth 39 

Ames, Elizabeth (Hall) 39 

Ames, Hannah 39 

Ames, Lucy 39 

Ames, Jacob 20, 27, 38 

Ames, James 22, 27. 33, 38-39 

Ames, James (son of James) 39 

Ames & Fobes 69 

Amherst College 178, 207, 211, 248 
Amsden, Bertha Florence .... 248 

Anderson, Elizabeth 75 

Andrews, Sarah 282 

Arms, Hudson L 172 



!88 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Arms, Rhoena Augusta (Rice) 172 

Arnold, Clementin L 205 

Ashby, Addie M 181 

Ashley, Lucinda 152 

Austin, Page 6, 7, 4h 266 

Authorities for Civil War ... 174 
Authorities for War of 1812.. 158 
Authorities for War of Revo- 
lution 34 

Ayres, Charles Perley 165 

Ayres, Eunice Harriet 81, 165 

Ayres, Grace Mason (Tidd) .. 165 
Ayres, Harriet W. (Knight).. 165 

Ayres, Hiram 165 

Ayres, Jabez (of New Brain- 
tree) 165 

Ayres, Jabez (of Newbury) . . 165 

Ayres, John 274, 277 

Ayres, Katherine Amelia .... 165 

Ayres, Louisa Allen 81, 165 

Ayres, Moses 7. 215, 266 

Ayres, Parley. See Perley . . . 280 
Ayres, Perley ....82, 160, 165, 280 
Ayres, Sarah Grace 165 

Backus, Rev. Charles 170 

Bacon, Abigail 97 

Ball, Mary A 263 

Ball, Samuel 274, 277 

Bangs, Thankful 89 

Banister, Rachel 128 

Banks, Ann 40 

Banks, Azubah (McMains) 39, 40 

Banks, Elizabeth 40 

Banks, James .. ..21, 23, 27, 39, 40 

Banks, Martha (White) 39 

Banks, Mary 40 

Banks, Noble 40 

Banks, Sarah 40 

Banks, William 22, 27, 28, 33, 37, 
39-40 

Barns, Asa 274, 277 

Barns, Comfort 274, 277 

Barns, Solomon 274, 277 

Barr, Abigail (Macomber) 207, 208 

Barr, Addison William 208 

Barr, Davidson 192 

Barr, Ebenezer N. ...160, 280, 281 

Barr, Henry G 208 

Barr, Hiram 160, 280, 281 

Barr, James, Jr 160, 162 

Barr, John, Jr 207 

Barr, Lucy A 192 

Barr, Lydia Alvira 240 



PAGE 

Barr, Mary Josephine 208 

Barr, Molly (Bridges) 207 

Barr, Sumner 106, 169, 207 

Barr, Susan B. (Robinson) ... 208 
Barr, William Robinson 14, 207- 

208 

Barrett, Helen S. F 260 

Bars, Ebenezer N. See Barr, 

Ebenezer N 281 

Bars, Hiram. See Barr, Hiram 281 
Bartlett, Abigail (Waterman) 150 

Bartlet, Elisha 274, 277 

Bartlett, Perez Waterman ... 150 
Bassett, Abigail (Stone) ..40, 141 
Bassett, Reman 22, 27, 40-41, 141 
Bassett, Heman (son of Heman) 40 

Bassett, Joel 40 

Bassett, Patty 40 

Bassett, Roxena 40 

Bassett, William 40 

Batt, Elizabeth (Correy) .... 41 

Batt Hill 41 

Batt, William 41 

Beard, Augustus Field 81 

Beard, Betsey (Field) 81 

Beard, Daniel 81 

Beard, George Miller 81 

Beard, Lucy 170 

Beard, William Spencer 81 

Beebe, Richard 69 

Bell Family 4i-43 

Bell, Abraham 23, 27, 30, 42, 108, 

274. 277 
Bell, Mrs. Abraham (Joslin) . . 42 

Bell Agnes 86 

Bell, Anna (Osborn) 42, 43 

Bell, Anna Osborn (daughter 

of above) 42 

Bell, Elizabeth (Campbell) ... 43 

Bell, Hannah (White) 43 

Bell, James 19, 27, 28, 41, 42, 43, 83, 

86, 134, 274, 277 
Bell, James, Jr. 23, 30, 42-43. 79, 

108, 277 

Bell, Janet 53 

Bell, John 27, 30, 43, 108 

Bell, Martha (Crawford) ...41, 86 

Bell, Melinda 42 

Bell, Patty Crawford 42 

Bell, Polly Davis 42 

Bell, Samuel 19, 30, 43, 108 

Bellows, Lissy 43 

Bellows, Ruth 124 

Bellows, Silas 20, 27, 28, 43 



INDEX 



289 



PAGE 

Bemis, James C 267 

Bemis, Sophronia 201 

Bennett, Eleanor 153 

Benson, Hannah 76 

Benson, John 76 

Bent, Betsey 223 

Berden, Huldah 246, 282 

Berry, Benjamin 45 

Berry, Ephraim 45 

Berry, Esther 45, 169 

Berry, Esther (Woodward) 44, 45 

Berry, Eunice 45 

Berry, Inez 189 

Berry, John 45 

Berry, Joseph 19, 20, 25, 44, 45 

Berry, Lydia 45 

Berry, Nancy (French) 278 

Berry, Sarah (Powers) 44 

Berry, Sheers 21, 25, 31, 44-45, 87, 
180 

Berry, Woodward 45, 278 

Bigelow, James 31, 45 

Bigelow, John C 201 

Black, Abraham 45 

Black, Anna (Parmenter) .... 47 

Black, Bethiah 46 

Black, Bethiah (Allen) 46 

Black Family 45-47 

Black, George 19, 20, 33, 46, 48, 94 

Black, George, 2d 48 

Black, Grace 61, 62 

Black, James 29, 46 

Black, Mary (Mclntyre) 45 

Black, Rebekah (Lyon) 46 

Black, Sally (Blair) 48 

Black, Stewart 19, 20, 22, 28, 46-47 
Black, William ... 19, 20, 27, 46, 47 

Blackman, Hannah 65, 66, 67 

Blair, Annie (Bullard-Hagar) . 48 

Blair, Asa 47 

Blair, Asa (nephew of above) 48 

Blair, Hosea 48 

Blair, James 21, 22, 28, 29, 31, 47-48, 

.105 
Blair, James (of Scotland) ... 47 
Blair, James (son of James) . . 48 
Blair, Mrs. James (Pepper) ... 47 
Blair, Joseph (brother of James) 47 
Blair, Joseph (son of James) 48 

Blair, Katy 48 

Blair, Lucy 48 

Blair, Polly 48 

Blair, Sally 48 

Blair, Sarah 153 

19 



PAGE 

Blair, Sarah (Joslyn) 48 

Blake, Flora 242 

Blake, Jonathan 160, 280 

Blake, Mrs. Joseph (Warren) 231 

Blake, Mary 181 

Bodfish, Benjamin 114 

Bodfish, Hannah 92, 114, 117 

Bodfish, Lydia (Crocker) 114 

Bolton, Apollos 31, 48 

Bolton, Daniel 74 

Bolton, Deborah (Washburn) 49 

Bolton, Elias 31, 48 

Bolton, Jane (Thompson) .... 49 
Bolton, Nathaniel, Jr. [Bullard] 27, 

49, 81 

Bolton, Nathaniel (father of 

above) 49 

Bolton, Oliver 49 

Boman, William 274, 277 

Bond, Amy A. (Chase-Earle) 246 

Bond, N. D 246 

Bothwell, Alexander, ist 49 

Bothwell, Alexander, 2d 27, 28, 29, 

38, 49-50, 51, 52, 65, 77, 155, 226 

Bothwell, Alexander, 3d 19, 21, 27, 

28, 29, 30, 50-51, 70 
Bothwell, Charlotte (Rock- 
wood) 52, 226 

Bothwell, Cheney 52, 226 

Bothwell, Electa (Rockwood) 52 

Bothwell, Ernests 227 

Bothwell, Eunice (Harper) ... 52 

Bothwell, Tames 27, 28, 50, 51 

Bothwell, John 19, 23, 27, 28, 29, 

50, 51-52, 148 

Bothwell, John, Jr. (son of 

above) 52 

Bothwell, Lizzie J. (wife of 

Sylvander = Mrs. Poland) 227 

Bothwell, Lucretia 52 

Bothwell, Martha A. (Mead).. 227 

Bothwell, Mary 38, 50 

Bothwell, Mary (wife of Alex- 
ander, 3d) 51 

Bothwell, Mary (Wilson) .... 51 

Bothwell, Prudence 50 

Bothwell, Rachel 50 

Bothwell, Rebecca (McFarland) 52 

Bothwell, Rebecka 52 

Bothwell, Reuben 52 

Bothwell, Sally (Prouty) 51 

Bothwell, Sarah 50 

Bothwell, Susannah 52 

Bothwell, Sylvander ...52, 226-227 



29° 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Bothwell, Sylvester • 226 

Bothwell, Sylvester Rockwood 227 
Bothwell, William 19, 23, 27, 29, 35, 
SO, 52, 130, 149, 274, 277 

Boutwel, Enoch 274, 277 

Bowman, Rhoda °^ 

Boyd Family 53 

Boyd, Abbie F. (Lovell) 227 

Boyd, Annis (Poland) 227 

Boyd, Bessie M 228 

Boyd, Cheney S3, 227 

Boyd, Isaac M 53, 227 

Boyd, James 20, 26, 27, 30, 31, 32, 
53-54, 167, 227 

Boyd, Janet (Bell) 53 

Boyd, John 19, 22, 27, 31, 33, 53, 

54, 272, 273 
Boyd, John (son of James) .. 53 

Boyd, John Flint 53, 227-228 

Boyd, Jenney 127 

Boyd, Judith (Hall) 54 

Boyd, Leon L 227 

Boyd, Leone iQo 

Boyd, Lucretia 53 

Boyd, Lulu P 227 

Boyd, Mabel A 227 

Boyd, Mary (daughter of James) 53, 
167 

Boyd, Mary E. (Stone) 198 

Boyd, Mehetabel 53 

Boyd, Rebekah 53 

Boyd, Samuel 53, 127 

Boyd, Susan (Flint) 53,227 

Boyd, William 53 

Boyd, Winthrop H 198 

Boyden, Adams 246 

Boyden, Harriet A. (Buffum) 247 

Boyden, lone 246 

Boyden, Julia M I35 

Boyden, Samuel 246 

Boyden, Stephen A. 6, 14, 246-247, 
260 

Bradford, Nancy 59 

Brenneman, Christian Charles 222 
Brenneman, Lucy May (Carle- 
ton) 222 

Brewer, Samuel 89 

Brewer, Susannah (French) . . 89 

Bridges, Molly 207 

Briggs, Asa 28, 54-55 

Briggs, Levina (Chaddock) ... 55 

Brimhall, Caroline (Nye) 166 

Brimhall, Elisha 166 

Brimhall, Eunice (Humphrey) 166 



PAGE 

Brimhall, Hannah 89 

Brimhall, Joel 142 

Brimhall, Jonas .160, 166, 280, 281 

Brimhall, Louisa (Stone) 142 

Brimhall, Samuel 166 

Brinkhall, Jonas. See Brimhall, 

Jonas 281 

British Regulars, enlistment of 117, 
130, 146 

Broad, Achsah (Stone) 143 

Broad, William 143 

Brooks, Allen Grant 228 

Brooks, Amy Ann (Allen) . . . 228 

Brooks, Betsy 168 

Brooks, Carlos Nathaniel 228 

Brooks, Clararuth 229 

Brooks, Evelyn N. (Pinney) . . 228 

Brooks, Jacob 23, 274, 277 

Brooks, Jennie Allen 229 

Brooks, Jonas 168 

Brooks, Josephyne Wells 

(Courtright) 228, 229 

Brooks, Mary (Chadwick) ... 228 

Brooks, Minnie Louise 228 

Brooks, Nathaniel (father of 

Nathaniel N.) 228 

Brooks, Nathaniel Courtright . 228 
Brooks, Nathaniel Newton 228-229 

Brooks, Ralph Pinney 228 

Brooks, William Nathaniel ... 228 

Brown, Aaron 56 

Brown, Azubah (Green) 56 

Brown, Eleanor 84 

Brown, Elizabeth (daughter of 

James) 56 

Brown, Elizabeth (daughter of 

John) , 56 

Brown, Esther 55 

Brown, James 23, 28 [Saml], 29, 33, 
35, 55-56, 130 

Brown, John 23, 27, 28, 56 

Brown, Julius Waverly 241 

Brown, Lucy 56 

Brown, Mary (wife of James) 55 
Brown, Mary (of Leicester).. 241 
Brown, Mary Ella (Spooner). 241 

Brown, Moses 55, I7i 

Brown, Patie 102, 103 

Brown, Phebe 56 

Brown, Phebe (Fosket) 56 

Brown, Rhoda (Clark) 55 

Brown, Samuel. See Brown, 

James. 
Brown, Susan i95, 239 



INDEX 



291 



PAGE 

Brown, Thankful (daughter of 

James) 55 

Brown, Thankful (sister of 

James) 55 

Brown University 159, 242 

Browning, Lucy Ann 185 

Bruce, Abigail (Richmond) ... 229 

Bruce, Bessie Louise 229 

Bruce, Doris 229 

Bruce, Dorothy Wilbur 202 

Bruce, Edith May 229 

Bruce, Hannah Jane (Chamber- 

lin) 229 

Bruce, Harry Sylvester 229 

Bruce, Joseph F 229 

Bruce, Joseph S. (son of Joseph 

S.) 229 

Bruce, Joseph Sylvester 229 

Bruce, Joseph Walter 229 

Bruce, Lewis Herman 202 

Bruce, Lora Belle (Wilbur) . . . 202 

Bruce, Mary (Burnett) 229 

Bruce, Roger 274. 277 

Bruce, Sophronia (Kimball) . . 229 

Bruce, Walter Jay 229 

Bryant, Catherine 260 

Bryant, Lemuel 274, 277 

Bufifum, Harriet A 247 

Bullard, Abigail 58 

Bullard, Abigail (Furness) ... 60 

Bullard, Adin 60, 250 

Bullard, Alice M 249 

Bullard, Alpha 60 

Bullard, Anna or Annie 48, 58, 201 
Bullard, Anna (Harrington) 56, 57, 

58, 59, 60 

Bullard, Asa 59 

Bullard, Asahel 225 

Bullard, Avery C 6, 57 

Bullard, Benjamin (son of Silas) 60 

Bullard, Betty 60 

Bullard, Calvin 61 

Bullard, Dorothy 58. 65, 66 

Bullard, Ebenezer 58, 59 

Bullard, Editha 61 

Bullard, George 57 

Bullard, George A 61 

Bullard, Hannah ..58, 143, 167, 169 

Bullard, Henry 57, 169 

Bullard, Hepsebath (daughter 

of Jonathan) 58 

Bullard, Hepsebeth (daughter 

of Jonathan, Jr.) 59 

Bullard, Isaac 27, 56, 58 



Bullard, Isaac (son of Jonathan, 

Jr.) 59 

Bullard, Joel 61, 184, 225 

Bullard, Jonathan 18, 22, 33, 40, 48, 
56, 57-59, 60, 65, 88, 141, 143, 

184, 201 

Bullard, Jonathan, Jr. 28, 30, 58, 59 
Bullard, Jonathan (son of above) 59 
Bullard, Jonathan (of Water- 
town) 57 

Bullard, Joseph 59 

Bullard, Lucy 59 

Bullard, Lydia 58 

Bullard, Lydia (Foster) 57, 58, 59, 
65 

Bullard, Marshall 59 

Bullard, Mary or Moley (daugh- 
ter of Silas) 60, 135 

Bullard, Mary (Furness) ... .60, 61 

Bullard, Melissa 6i 

Bullard, Moley. See Bullard, 
Mary. 

Bullard, Moses 58 

Bullard, Nancy (Bradford) ... 59 

Bullard, Nancy (Dwight) 225 

Bullard, Nathan 59 

Bullard [Bolton], Nathaniel . . 27 
Bullard, Pattie (or Patty) ..58, 141 

Bullard, Phineas 58, 106 

Bullard, Prudence (Bothwell). 50 
Bullard, Ruth (daughter of 

Jonathan) 58 

Bullard, Ruth (daughter of 

Jonathan, Jr., died young) 59 
Bullard, Ruth (daughter of 

Jonathan, Jr.) 59 

Bullard, Ruth (daughter of 

Silas) 60 

Bullard, Ruth (Harrington) .. 57 
Bullard, Ruth (Whittemore) . . 59 

Bullard, Sally 59 

Bullard, Samuel 20, 26, 27, 58. 59-60 

Bullard, Sanford H 60, 225 

Bullard, Sarah 58 

Bullard, Silas 19, 23, 28, 29, 58, 60- 
61, 171, 184, 274, 277 

Bullard, Silas, Jr 60 

Bullard, Silas (great-grandson 

of Silas) 61 

Bullard, Sybilla 58 

Bullard, Valentine 50, 58 

Bullard, William 60 

Bullard, William Henry 184-185, 

225 



292 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Bullen. See also Boyden. 

Bullen, Caroline Matilda (Earle) 246 

Bullen, Mary 226 

Bullen, Stephen 246 

Bunker Hill 20 

Burgoyne's Army, deserters from 

117, 130, 146 

Burnet, Thomas 274, 277 

Burnett, Mary 229 

Burt, Alfred E 243 

Burt, David iiS 

Burt, Laura G 49, 168 

Burt, Martha Elizabeth 243 

Buss, Maria 169 

Butler, Abigail (Thresher) ... 61 
Butler, Algernon Sidney. See 

Crawford, Algernon Sidney 172 

Butler, Alice 61, 62 

Butler, Daniel 61 

Butler, Elias 62 

Butler, Grace (Black) 61, 62 

Butler, Isaiah 23, 61, 62 

Butler, James 62 

Butler, John 19, 22, 29, 30, 31, 61-62 

Butler, John, Jr 61 

Butler, Lucretia 61 

Butler, Melina 62 

Butler, Melissa 62 

Butler, Molly 61, 172 

Butler, Prudence (wife of John 

Alden) 36 

Butler, Prudence (daughter of 

Isaiah) 61 

Butler, Sarah 61 

Butler, Walter 62 

Butler, Walter (younger brother 

of above) 62 

Cafifee, Hattie (Robinson) .... 263 

Cafifee, Stewart B 263 

Caldwell, Eliza (Parker) 181, 182, 

256 

Caldwell, George 181, 256 

Caldwell, George Lyman 181-182, 

256 

Caldwell, James 181 

Caldwell, James W 256 

Caldwell, Mary (Blacke) 181 

Caldwell, Rachel (wife of James 

W.=Mrs. McLoud) 256 

Caldwell, William 273 

Cambel, John 274, 277 

Camber, Charles C 239 

Camber, Grace Elizabeth 239 



PAGE 

Camber, Mary Ann (Ross) . . . 239 

Camber, Ruth Weston 239 

Camber, Stephen Ross 239 

Campbell, Elizabeth 43 

Canon, Charles 227 

Canon, Lulu P. (Boyd) 227 

Capen, Betsy 199, 224 

Carleton, Albert Sawyer 222 

Carleton, Herbert 221 

Carleton, Lucy May 222 

Carleton, Susan Elizabeth (Reed)22i 
Carleton, Walter Herbert .... 222 

Carpenter, Nathan 117 

Carpenter, Patience (wife of 

Silas Nye) 117 

Carpenter, Patience (wife of 

Nathan) 117 

Caswell, George 19, 20, 22, 29, 62- 

63, 154 
Caswell, George (son of above) 62 

Caswell, Hannah 62 

Caswell, Luceba 62 

Caswell, Lucena 62 

Caswell, Weltha 62 

Caswell, Weltha (Richmond). 62 
Chace. See also Chase. 

Chace, Horace E 103 

Chace, Laura B. (Hunt) 103 

Chaddock, Bowman ... .30, 63, 116 

Chaddock, Calvin 64, 116 

Chaddock, Joseph 27, 31, 33, 63-64, 

130, 233 

Chaddock, Levina 55 

Chaddock, Marcy (Nye) ...63, 116 
Chaddock, Meletiah (Nye) ... 116 
Chaddock, Parcis (Smith) .... 64 
Chaddock, Sarah (wife of 

Joseph) 63, 64 

Chaddock, Thomas 27, 28, 64 

Chadwick, Mary 228 

Chamberlain, Edward 210, 214-215, 

219 

Chamberlain, Edwin 214 

Chamberlain, Jacob 214 

Chamberlain, Lydia B. (Wright) 214 

Chamberlain, Ruth E 219, 220 

Chamberlain, Ruth (Upton) . . 214 

Chamberlain, Thomas J 214 

Chamberlin, Celia (Williams) 229 
Chamberlin, Hannah Jane . . . 229 

Chamberlin, Lyman 229 

Chapman, Carrie Ethelyne ... 259 
Chapman, Carrie E. (Crawford) 259 
Chapman, Carrol Everett .... 259 



INDEX 



293 



PAGE 

Chapman, John W 259 

Chapman, John Wilbert 259 

Chapman, Mirriam Stevens . . 259 
Chapman, Perley Crawford ... 259 

Chapman, Sara Rena 259 

Chase. See also Chace. 

Chase, Abbie E 230 

Chase, Amy A 246 

Children of Civil War Soldiers 264 

Church, Caleb 30, 64-65, 74 

Church, Caleb 134 

Civil War, Authorities for ... 174 
Civil War, Regiments in. 

See pp. ix, x 

Clampherd Meadow 35 

Clapp, Irene 187 

Clapp, Jonas 171 

Clark, Amos (grandfather of 

Mason) 166 

Clark, Amos (father of Mason) 166 

Clark, Charles 89 

Clark, Emma E 193 

Clark, Hannah (Craig) 166 

Clark, John C 166, 226 

Clark, Jonas 50 

Clark, Katherine 151 

Clark, Mason 160, 166, 280 

Clark, Patty (Johnson) 166 

Clark, Mrs. Rhoda (of Rutland) 55 

Clark, Simeon 166 

Clark, Ursula (Richardson) ... 166 

Cody, B. Evelyn 253 

Cody, Catherine 253 

Cody, Catherine Rowena (Mon- 
roe) 253 

Cody, Edmund 253 

Cody, Ivah C 253 

Cody, Ralph M 253 

Coldwell. See Caldwell. 

Colton, Chauncey 176, 255 

Colton, Lavinia H 177, 255 

Colton, Nathaniel W. 176-177, 255 

Companies 

in the Revolutionary War 

(designated by names of Captains) 

Allen, James I49 

Allen, Noah 22 

Bates, Joseph I45 

Buckland, Stephen 140 

Chambers, Matthew 118 

Cogswell, Amos 25 

Crawford, John . . 18, 19, 21, 26, 28 
Cutler, Joseph 29 



PAGE 

Dexter, Samuel 20 

Doty, Barnabas 109 

Earll, Ralph 27 

Elliot, Joseph 32, 133 

Fisher, Thomas 31, 76 

Gilbert, Daniel 30, 31 

Goodale, Nathan 25 

Grainger, John 20 

Hamilton, Nathaniel 22 

Haskell, Elnathan 131 

Hazeltine, Simeon 19, 20 

Heywood, Benjamin 142 

Hodges, Edmund 26 

Holden, Abel 25 

Howard, John 22 

Howe, Abner 23 

Knowlton, Ezekiel 21 

Lyman, Daniel 65 

Mitchell, Nathan 149 

Nye, Benjamin 29 

Packard, John 20 

Paige, Timothy 31 

Reed, John 24 

Richardson, Joseph 31 

Sears, Barnabas 21 

Shay, Daniel 25 

Sibley, Joseph 27 

Soul, Moses 20 

Toogood, William 142 

Wadsworth, Joseph 30 

Washburn, Seth 20 

Wattles, Mason 78 

Whipple, Thomas 27 

Wilbore, Joshua 109 

Conant, Abiah 66 

Conant, Abigail (daughter of 

James) 66 

Conant, Abigail (daughter of 

Timothy) 67 

Conant, Abigail S 167 

Conant, Albert Steuben 167 

Conant, Betsy 66 

Conant, Charles 66 

Conant, Cloe (Allen) 37 

Conant, Deborah (daughter of 

James) 65 

Conant, Deborah (daughter of 

Timothy) 67 

Conant, Deborah (Lovell) 67 

Conant, Dorothy (Bullard) ..65, 66 

Conant, Elijah 65 

Conant, Eliza Ann 167 

Conant, Frank S 244 

Conant, Rev. Gaius 37 



294 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Conant, George Fay 167 

Conant, George W 167 

Conant, Hannah (daughter of 

Luther) 66 

Conant, Hannah (daughter of 

Timothy) 67 

Conant, Hannah (Blackman) 65, 

66, 67 

Conant, Harriet Shattuck 167 

Conant, Henry (son of Lot) . . 167 
Conant, Henry Lafayette (son 

of James, Jr.) 167 

Conant, James 20, 25, 28, 65-66, 67 
Conant, James, Jr. 66, 143, 160, 166- 

167, 280 
Conant, John (son of James) 66 
Conant, John (son of James, Jr.) 167 

Conant, Joseph 167 

Conant, Justus 66 

Conant, Lois 66 

Conant, Lois (Conant) 66 

Conant, Lot 65, 67, 160, 161, 166- 

167, 280 
Conant, Louisa (daughter of 

James, Jr.) 167 

Conant, Louisa (daughter of 

Luther) 66 

Conant, Louisa L. (daughtef 

of Lot) 167 

Conant, Lucy (daughter of 

James) 65 

Conant, Lucy (daughter of 

Timothy) 67 

Conant, Luke 167 

Conant, Luther 20. 25, 66-67 

Conant, Luther (son of James) 65 

Conant, Lydia 66 

Conant, Maria 167 

Conant, Mary H 167 

Conant, Mary (White) 66 

Conant, Nathan 66 

Conant, Patty (Stone) 167 

Conant, Polly (McClellen) ... 167 

Conant, Roger 67 

Conant, Samuel 167 

Conant, Sarah (daughter of 

Timothy) 67 

Conant, Sarah Jane (daughter 

of Lot) 167 

Conant, Sukey (Stone). See 

Conant. Susan (Stone). 

Conant, Sullivan 66 

Conant, Susan (daughter of 

James, Jr.) 167 



Conant, Susan (daughter of 

Luther) 66 

Conant, Susan (Stone) ...143, 167 
Conant, Susanna (eldest daugh- 
ter of Timothy) 67 

Conant, Susanna (second daugh- 
ter of Timothy) 67, 139 

Conant, Susanna (Allen) 66 

Conant, Sylvanus 67 

Conant, Thomas 167 

Conant, Timothy 21, 25, 65, 66, 67 
Conant, Timothy (son of Tim- 
othy) 67 

Conant, Walter 167 

Conant & Macomber's Orchestra 7 
Continental Soldiers 24, 25, 30, 31, 

32 
Converse, Boswell. See Con- 
verse, Roswell 281 

Converse, Rosw^ell . . . 160, 280, 281 
Cooley, Caroline Cutler ...179, 255 

Cornell University 242 

Correy, Elizabeth 41 

Courtright, Josephyne Wells . 228 

Cowen, Charles 194 

Cow^en, Gertrude Annette 

(Parker) 194 

Craige, Elizabeth 122, 126 

Craige, Hannah 166 

Craige, James 121, 126 

Craige, James, Jr. 119, 121, 155, 156 

Craige, Jean 47, 121, 124 

Craige, Joseph ..22, 32, 2Z, 98, loi 
Craige, Rachel (Wallis) ...121, 126 
Crawford, Aaron, 19, 23, 27, 29, 67- 

68, 69, 77 
Craw^ford, Aaron (of Rutland, 

father of Aaron) 41, 68 

Craw^ford, Aaron, Jr. (son of 

Aaron) 68 

Craw^ford, Abbie T. (Stevens). 259 
Crawford, Agnes (Wilson) 41, 68 
Crawford, Alexander 29, 67, 68-69, 

70, 71, 72, no, 163, 256 
Crawford, Alexander, 2d (son 

of John) 29, 69-70, 71, 207, 250, 
252 
Crawford, Alexander (son of 

Aaron) 68 

Crawford, Alexander (son of 

William) 73, 163, 266, 267 

Crawford, Alfred Galen 70, 71, 252 
Crawford [Butler], Algernon 
Sidney 172 



INDEX 



295 



PAGE 

Crawford, Alvira (Noyes) ... 252 
Crawford, Anson Alexander . . 70 
Crawford, Benjamin Franklin 70 
Crawford, Bethiah Willis 69, 207, 

252 

Crawford, Calvin 71 

Crawford, Caroline (Gault) 185, 

247, 256 

Crawford, Carrie E 259 

Crawford, Charles 185 

Crawford, Charles Sumner 70. 71, 

247, 256 

Crawford, Chloe 68 

Crawford, Clarinda 246 

Crawford, Cyrene S 259 

Crawford, Edgar 193 

Crawford, Eliakim 71 

Crawford, Eliza (daughter of 

Samuel son of John) no 

Crawford, Eliza (Fay) 172 

Crawford, Elizabeth (daughter 

of Aaron) 68 

Crawford, Elizabeth (daughter 

of John) 71, IS5 

Crawford, Elizabeth (daughter 

of William) tz, 161 

Crawford, Elizabeth (Craw- 
ford = wife of Alexander) ()T, 

69, 70, 72 

Crawford, Ellen (SiblejO 185 

Crawford, Emeline Maria or 

Mariah 70, 250 

Crawford, Emma (Tindall) ... 258 

Crawford, Emma Nita 258 

Crawford, Frank 185 

Crawford, Fred E 185 

Crawford, Galen Allen 70, 252 

Crawford, George H 185 

Crawford, Hannah 71, 243 

Crawford, Harriot yj, 

Crawford, Harry Calvin 259 

Crawford, Henry 70 

Crawford, Henry Willis 71, 185, 

247, 256 

Crawford, Hiram A 252 

Crawford, Hosea Willis 70, 185, 

247, 256 
Crawford, Huldah (Berden) 246, 

282 

Crawford, Isabel 'JZ 

Crawford, James T2, 172 

Crawford, Jeales 68 

Crawford, Jeales (Gill) 68 



PAGE 

Crawford, John 18, 19, 21, 23, 24, 
26, 27, 2^, 30, zz, 68, 69, 70-72, 
7Z, 98, 132, 15s, 185, 207, 242, 
250. 256, 270, 272, 282, 283 
Crawford, John (son of Sam- 
uel) 282 

Crawford, John, Jr. 29, 30, 31, 71, 

72 
Crawford, John Andrews .... 282 
Crawford, John Gault 70, 71, 247, 
256-259 

Crawford, John Rice 282-283 

Crawford, Josiah 71 

Crawford, Laurinda (Wilson) 246 

Crawford, Lucinda 69 

Crawford, Lucy (daughter of 

John) 71 

Crawford, Lucy (daughter of 

William) 73 

Crawford, Lucy Ann (Brown- 
ing) 185 

Crawford, Luther 68 

Crawford, Martha 41, 68, 86 

Crawford, Mary (sister of 

Alexander, ist) no, 112 

Crawford, Mary (Ford-Perkins) 71, 

132 
Crawford, Mary (Henderson) 69, 

7Z, 98 
Crawford, Mary A. (Harring- 
ton) 259 

Crawford, Mary Packard 70 

Crawford, Molly (daughter of 

William) ^t, 

Crawford, Molly (Butler) .... 172 

Crawford, Nancy 71 

Crawford, Nellie A 185 

Crawford, O. E 247 

Crawford, Patty 71 

Crawford, Phebe (Greene) ... 71 

Crawford, Polly 71 

Crawford, Rachel (daughter of 

Aaron) 68 

Crawford, Rachel (daughter of 

John) 71 

Crawford, Rachel (Henderson) 69, 
71, "72, 98 

Crawford, Robert 68 

Crawford, Rosa W. (Parker) .. 193 

Crawford, Rufus TZ 

Crawford, Ruth 69 

Crawford, Sally (Moore) .... 2S2 
Crawford, Salmon 69 



296 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Crawford, Samuel (son of 

Aaron of Rutland) 68 

Crawford, Samuel (son of 

John) 71, 246 

Crawford, Samuel (son of 

above) i54. 246, 282 

Crawford, Sarah (daughter of 

John) 71 

Crawford, Sarah (daughter of 

William) IZ 

Crawford, Sarah (Andrews) . . 282 
Crawford, Sophia (Cunning- 
ham) 164 

Crawford, Spencer 68 

Crawford, Susan ..69, no, 206, 207 

Crawford, Vashti 69 

Crawford, William 23, 27, 28, 29, 

32, zz, 69, 72-73, 98, 161, 163, 

172 
Crawford, William, Jr. 73. i59, 160, 

161, 162, 163-164, 171, 280, 281 
Crawford, William (elder 

brother of above) 73 

Crawford, William (son of 

Aaron) 68 

Crawford, William Amory ... 70 
Crawford, William Channing 164 

Crawford, WilHam S '. i77 

Crawford's Cornet Band 7. 185, 

187, 195, 208 

Crocker, Lydia 1 14 

Crocker, Nathaniel 165 

Crocker, Polly L 37, 165 

Crossley, Mary 259 

Crowell, Betsy 202 

Crowell, Elizabeth A 24S 

Crowell, Hannah 238 

Cunningham, Bethiah 

(Thresher) IZ 

Cunningham, Jonathan ... 23, 73-74 

Cunningham, Nathaniel 164 

Cunningham, Sarah (wife of 

Nathaniel) 164 

Cunningham, Sophia 164 

Cushing, Mary 132 

Dana, Rev. J 43 

Darling, Lucretia 149 

Darling, Rebecka TJ 

Darling, Thomas 30, 65, 74 

Darling, Zenas 74 

Dartmouth College 64, 116, 139, 

159, 163 

Davis, Adin 74 



Davis, Almira Ann 222 

Davis, Barak 74 

Davis, Catherine 279 

Davis, Caty 74 

Davis, Dorothy Heath 74 

Davis, Ellen E 220 

Davis, Ezra 74 

Davis, Hannah ((Snow) 74 

Davis, John 74 

Davis, Katherine (wife of 

Samuel) 74, 75 

Davis, Lucretia 74 

Davis, Mary (Osborn) 75 

Davis, Minnie 209 

Davis, Nancy 74 

Davis, Nellie 192 

Davis, Polly 74 

Davis, Samuel 23, zz, 74-75 

Davis, Simon (father of Samuel) 74 
Davis, Simon (grandfather of 

Samuel) 74 

Davis, Solomon 222 

Day, John P 215 

Dayton, Charles 241 

Dayton, Marion Frances 

(Spooner) 241, 255 

Dean, Abbie (Deland) 186 

Dean, Amos B 180, 251 

Dean, Calvin no 

Dean, Caroline Melvina 251 

Dean, Charles (father of 

Charles D.) 186 

Dean, Charles D 186 

Dean, Charlotte Emily (Rus- 
sell) 251 

Dean, Clarence Edgar 251 

Dean, Daniel W 182, 223, 224 

Dean, David W 235 

Dean, Delotia (Eastman) 182, 223, 
224 

Dean, Edmund 62 

Dean, Elijah 182, 223, 224, 225 

Dean, Elijah, Jr 225, 235 

Dean, Elijah C 225 

Dean, Eliza 180, 241 

Dean, Emeline Mariah (Craw- 
ford) 249 

Dean, Emerson 251 

Dean, Esther 100 

Dean, Florence A. (Gilbert) . . 235 
Dean, Gardner Milton 14, 70, 71, 
250-251 

Dean, George A 235 

Dean, Gertrude M. (Tallis) .. 251 



INDEX 



297 



PAGE 

Dean, Grace (Parmenter) 126 

Dean, Grace G 186 

Dean, Isaiah 182, 224 

Dean, James 21, 33, 112, 130, 180, 
250, 251 

Dean, Jessie I. (Taylor) 251 

Dean, Jessie Mildred 251 

Dean, Dr. John 152, 180, 241, 251 
Dean, John (father of Elijah C.) 225 

Dean, Kathrin 127 

Dean, Levi L 180, 251 

Dean, Lucella E. (Woodis) ... 235 

Dean, Luther 250 

Dean, Lyman 255 

Dean, Mabel 251 

Dean, Maria F. (Leonard) ... 186 
Dean, Mary (daughter of Cal- 
vin) no 

Dean, Mary M. (Goodale) 235 

Dean, Melancey Dennison .... 223 

Dean, Minnie Gertrude 251 

Dean, Nancy (Parks) 180, 241, 251 
Dean, Prudence (Eastman) ... 225 

Dean, Ralph Emerson 251 

Dean, Reuben 46 

Dean, Richard of Oakham 126 

Dean, Richard 186 

Dean, Samuel 224 

Dean, Seth 182, 223, 224 

Dean, Sidney Irving 251 

Dean, Sidney Irving, Jr 251 

Dean, Susan A. (Simmons) ... 182 

Dean, Walter ng 

Dean, Walter (of Taunton) . . 186 

Dean, Warren 251 

Dean, Wilder E '. 235 

Deen, William 275, 277 

Deland, Abbie 186 

Deland, Daniel 19, 20, 22, 25, 29, 75 
Deland, Daniel, Jr. (or Daniel • 

Crawford) 20, 75 

Deland, Elisabeth (Hatfield) .. 75 
Deland, Elizabeth (Anderson) 75 

Deland, Paul 75 

Delano, Ruth 154 

Denny, Cora B. (Knight) .... 231 

Denny, Mrs. Parkman T 231 

Deserters from Bourgoyne's 

Army 117, 130, 146 

Dewey, George 219 

Dewey, Hannah E. (Pellett) . . 219 

Dexter, James 217 1 

Dexter, Tabitha 217 I 



Doane, Harriet 206 

Doty, Moses 25, 76 

Dow, Daniel 160 

Dow, Zenas 160, 280 

Draper, Arthur Daniel 242 

Draper, Chloe 261 

Draper, Ella Jane 242 

Draper, Emory B. F 242 

Draper, Hattie Ann (Spooner) 242 

Draper, Mary Anna 242 

Draper, Mary E 204 

Draper, Walter Emory 242 

Duell, Elizabeth (Hallowell) .. 202 

Duell, George S 202 

Duell, Mary Elizabeth 202 

Duffey, Florence N 260 

Duffey, George 259-260 

DufFey, Ida E 260 

Duffey, James 260 

Duffey, Lizzie E 260 

Duffey, Mary (Crossley) 259 

Duffey, Mary Ann 260 

Duffey, Peter 259 

Duffey, Sarah (Wilson) 260 

Dunbar, Benjamin 30, 76, 77 

Dunbar, Benjamin (son of 

Benson) yj 

Dunbar, Benson 30, 76-77 

Dunbar, Benson, Jr. (son of 

above) yy 

Dunbar, Hannah (Benson) ... y6 
Dunbar, James .. .27, 30, 68, y6, yy 
Dunbar, James (of Bridgewater) 76 

Dunbar, Marcy yy 

Dunbar, Martha (Packard) .... y6 

Dunbar, Orpah yy 

Dunbar, Rebecka (Darling) .. yy 

Dunbar, Roxie yy 

Dunbar, Ruth yy 

Dunbar, Wealthy (Washburn) 76 

Dunn, Alexander 78 

Dunn, George 20, 77-78 

Dunn, Jane 85 

Dunn, Rachel 78 

Dunn, Rachel (Harper) 78 

Dunn, William Harper 19, 20, 25, 
78 

Dwelly, Herbert, 78 

Dwelly, Joseph 78-79 

Dwelly, Joseph (father of 

Joseph) 79 

Dwelly, Joseph Benjamin (son 

of Joseph) 79 

Dwelly, Mary 79 



298 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Dwelly, Mary (mother of 

Joseph) 79 

Dwelly, Thomas Miles 79 

Dwelly, Triphosa (Parmenter) 79 

Dwelly, William 79 

Dwight, Nancy 225 

Eager, Hannah (wife of Joseph) 79 

Eager, Joseph 19, 20, 79 

Eager, Sarah Wood 79 

Eames, Anna 105, 106 

Earle, Amy A. (Chase) 246 

Earle, Antipas 246 

Earle, Caroline Matilda 246 

Earle, Iris Melissa 188 

Eastman, Delotia 182, 223, 224 

Eastman, Prudence 225 

Eddy, Mrs. Ackland (Craw- 
ford, Nellie A.) 185 

Edison, Orra W 244 

Edson, Ebenezer 80 

Edson, Lucy (Packard) 80 

Edson, Mary 119 

Edson, Nathan 19, 23, 27, 28, 80, 
275, 27-7 

Edson, Susanna (Allen) 80 

Edwards, Ambrose 189 

Edwards, Berniece 189 

Edwards, Dexter Hill 189 

Edwards, Eva (Hill) 189 

Edwards, Irvin Ambrose 189 

Edwards, Louesa A 230 

Egery, Ruth Hathaway 242 

Eight Months' Regiments ...19, 20 

Eliot, John 119 

Estabrook, Aaron 45 

Evans, Jacob 55 

Evans, Thankful (Brown) .... 55 

Fairbank, Caroline Melvina 

(Dean) 251 

Fairbank, Clarissa 220, 226 

Fairbank, Ephraim 210 

Fairbank, James Chandler 135, 168, 

210 

Fairbank, James Packard 251 

Fairbank, John Barnard 3, 14, 210- 

214 

Fairbank, Laban 220 

Fairbank, Lurana (Robinson) 135, 

210 
Fairbank, Marion Corinne .... 251 
Fairbank, Nancj-- (Wheelock) 220 
Fairbank, Samuel 220 



PAGE 

Fairbank, Samuel B 165 

Fales, Harriet (Macomber) .. no 

Fales, Harvey no 

Families that sent soldiers to 

the Civil War 265 

Fay, Eliza 172 

Fay, Susannah I35, I43 

Fay, Thaddeus I35 

Fay, Thankful (wife of Thad- 
deus) 135 

Felton, Hepsibah (Sheldon) . . 88 

Felton, Joseph I55 

Felton, Lydia 86, 88 

Felton, Skelton (father of 

Lydia) 88 

Felton, Major Skelton ....272, 273 

P'ield, Betsey (Frink) 80 

Field, Betsey 81 

Field, Christian (Hubbard) ... 80 

Field, Isabella 81 

Field, John 80, 81 

Field, Paul 80 

Field, Rhoda (Bowman) 81 

Field, Spencer 32, 49, 80-81 

Field, Zechariah 80 

Fiske, Orpha 232 

Fitch, Patty 279 

Fitts, Mrs. Deborah (wife of 

Benjamin Forbes) 86 

Fitts, Harriet A 178 

Fitts, Harriot (Stone) 142 

Fitts, Jesse 142 

Fitts, Jonathan 33 

Flagg, Miss 224 

Flint, Daniel 160, 167, 280 

Flint, Daniel Waldo 167 

Flint, Ebzada Elenor 167 

Flint, Eunice (How) 98 

Flint, John 98, 167 

Flint, Lucy 98, 167 

Flint, Mary (Boyd) 167 

Flint, Mary Adaline 167 

Flint, Phebe (wife of John) ... 167 

Flint, Susan S3. 227 

Flint, Thomas 98 

Fobes, Abigail (Allen) Z7 

Fobes, Allis (Stone) 142 

Fobes, Amos 240 

Fobes, Joseph 203 

Fobes, Lucy (Stone- Waterman) 142 

Fobes, Peres 142, 171 

Fobes, Dr. Seth ...zi, IS9, 166, 232 
Fobes, Ames & 69 



INDEX 



299 



PAGE 

Forbes. See also Forbush and 

Furbush. 

Forbes Family 82-86 

Forbes, Aaron 86 

Forbes, Agnes (Bell) 86 

Forbes, Archibald 21, 27, 29, 31, 

82-83 

Forbes, Archibald, Jr 83 

Forbes, Arthur 82, 83, 84, 85 

Forbes, Arthur (son of Robert) 86 

Forbes, Arthur, Jr 82, 83 

Forbes, Benjamin 84 

Forbes, Catherine (Harper) . . 85 

Forbes, Charles 27, 82, 83 

Forbes, Christian 86 

Forbes, Eleanor (Brown) 84 

Forbes, Hannah 84 

Forbes, Huldah (wife of Ben- 
jamin = Mrs. Prouty) .... 84 

Forbes, Jacob 84 

Forbes, James 23, 26, 27, 32, 82, 

83-84, 275, 277 

Forbes, James, Jr 84 

Forbes, Jane (Dunn) 85 

Forbes, John 19, 23, 27, 30, 82, 83, 

84-85, 272, 277 

Forbes, Jonas 84 

Forbes, Jonathan 29, 85 

Forbes, Keziah (Green) 84 

Forbes, Lammond 84 

Forbes, Margaret 82 

Forbes, Martha 82 

Forbes, Polly 84 

Forbes, Robert 26, 29, 79, 82, 85-86 
Forbes, Ruth (Lamond) 82, 83, 84, 

85 

Forbes, Sarah (Moore) 83 

Forbes, Susey 84 

Forbes, William 83 

Forbs. See Forbes, Forbush 

and Furbush. 
Forbus. See Forbes and Forbush. 
Forbush. See also Forbes. 

Forbush, James 275, 277 

Forbush, John 275, 277 

Forbush, Widow. See Forbes, 

Ruth (Lamond). 

Forhay, Ella 206 

Ford, John 132 

Ford, Mary 71, 132 

Ford, Mary (Cushing) 132 

Fosket, Phebe 56 

Foster, Addie Lione 204 



PAGE 

Foster, Addie M. (Ashby) ... 181 

Foster, Albert Edward 181 

Foster, Albert Henry 180-181, 203 

Foster, Alice W. (Smith) 181 

Foster, Alpheus 87 

Foster, Benjamin ....22, 27, 28, 86 
Foster, Benjamin (son of 

Ebenezer) 87 

Foster, Charles (son of Wil- 
liam) 87 

Foster, Charles (son of above, 

and Gov. of Ohio) 87 

Foster, Deborah (wife of Ben- 
jamin = Mrs. Fitts) 86 

Foster, Ebenezer 21, 22, 25, 29, 33, 
58, 86-87, 88, 109, 122 

Foster, Ebenezer, Jr 87, 136 

Foster, Ebenezer (of Rutland) 58, 
86, 88 

Foster, Elizabeth 181 

Foster, Frank Webster 181 

Foster, George B 181 

Foster, Hannah (daughter of 

Ebenezer) 87 

Foster, Hannah (of New 

Braintree) 151 

Foster, Hannah (Hinds) 88 

Foster, Hannah (Parlin) ....49, 87 

Foster, Harold Abbott 181 

Foster, James R 180, 203 

Foster, James S 45 

Foster, Jean (Kidder) 181 

Foster, John 86 

Foster, Joseph 87 

Foster, Lydia (daughter of 

Ebenezer) 87, 109, 168 

Foster, Lydia (sister of Eben- 
ezer) 57, 58, 59, 65 

Foster, Lydia (Felton) 86, 88 

Foster, Mary A. (Webster) . . 204 

Foster, Mary E 221 

Foster, Mary E. (Draper) .... 204 

Foster, Mary Lucia 204 

Foster, Maynard Ashby 181 

Foster, Miriam (Ruggles) .... 136 

Foster, Molly 87 

Foster, Nancy (Henry) ...180, 203 

Foster, Nathaniel H 203-204 

Foster, Skelton 22, 28, 86, 88 

Foster, Spencer 87 

Foster, Stephen 20, 88 

Foster, William 87 

Foster, Zadock 87 

Freeman, Elijah 151 



300 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Freeman, Susanna (wife of 

President Labaree) 151 

Freeman, Susanna (Weeks) .. 151 
French, Abigail or Nabby .... 278 

French, Abigail (Stone) 89 

French, Ann 89 

French, Anne (Smith) 89 

French, Anson H 89 

French, Asa 21, 23, 29, 33, 70, 88- 
89, 14s, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 
276, 277, 278 

French, Asa, Jr 89, 103 

French, Bathsheba 89 

French, Betsey 89, 278 

French, Betsey (French) ..89, 278 

French, Caroline Denny 279 

French, Catherine Davis 279 

French, Charles 279 

French, Cyrus 89 

French, Edwin 279 

French, Eliza 89 

French, Erastus S 89 

French, Freman 89 

French, Hannah (Brimhall) . . 89 

French, Hannah H 278 

French, Hayden (Shaw) 88, 278, 
279 

French, Isaac 171, 278, 279 

French, John (of Halsted, Eng- 
land) 278 

French, John (I of Oakham, 

father of Asa) 88 

French, John (II of Oakham, 

brother of Asa) 88, 270, 278-9 
French, John (III of Oakham, 

son of Asa) 89, 171, 278 

French, John (of Taunton) ... 278 

French, Marcy 278 

French, Mary (daughter of 

John III of Oakham) .... 89 

French, Mary A 270 

French, Mercy 145 

French, Nancy 278 

French, Nancy Davis 279 

French, Patty (Fitch) 279 

French, Philena 278 

French, Rhoda 278 

French, Samuel 89 

French, Sarah 279 

French, Sarah Eaton 279 

French, Susannah 89 

French, Thankful (Bangs- 
Thrasher) 89 

Frink, Betsey 80 



PAGE 

Frink, Delia (Stone) 204 

Frink, Hiram Everett 204 

Frink, Dr. John 80, 204 

Frink, Lillie Belle 204 

Frink, Sophronia Abiah (Town) 193, 
204 

Frink, Rev. Thomas 204 

Frink, Willard A 184, 193, 204 

Frink, William S 204 

Frost, Silas 48 

Fuller, David 114 

Fuller, Elizabeth 90 

Fuller, Jabez 25, 26, 89-90 

Fuller, Jabez (son of above) . . 90 
Fuller, Ruth (wife of Jabez) . . 90 

Fuller, Thomas 90 

Furbush. See Forbes and Forbush. 
Furbush, Widow. See Forbes, 
Ruth (Lamond). 

Furness, Abigail 60 

Furness, Benjamin 60 

Furness, Lydia 123 

Furness, Mary 60 

Furness, Sarah (wife of Ben- 
jamin) 60 

Gafifney, Thomas C 165 

Gaffney, William 92 

Gait, Mat 22 

Gates, Mary (Polly) 180, 187 

Gault, Caroline M 185, 247, 256 

Gault, John 185 

Gault, Mary Ann 239 

Gault, Rebecca (Kenney) 185 

Gibbs, Anna P 209 

Gibbs, Jonathan 209 

Gibbs, Miriam 200, 231 

Gilbert, Abigail (Nabby 

French) 278 

Gilbert, Alonzo Edwin 202 

Gilbert, Anna (Hayden) 90 

Gilbert, Arunah 279 

Gilbert, Charlotte Elizabeth 

(Wilbur) 202 

Gilbert, David 90 

Gilbert, Elijah 28, 90 

Gilbert, Eugene Alonzo 202 

Gilbert, Florence A 235 

Gilbert, Henery 275, 277 

Gilbert, James 90 

Gilbert, Lemuel 275, 277 

Gilbert, Molly 90 

Gilbert, Moses 21, 90 

Gilbert, Nathalie Wilbur 202 



INDEX 



301 



Gill, Janet (Mclntyre) 90 

Gill, Jeales 68 

Gill, Thomas 20, 29, 31, 90-91 

Gill, Thomas (of Leicester) ... 90 

Gilles, Joseph 20, 91 

Gladding, Phebe S 236 

Glazier, Azubah (Nye) 92 

Glazier, Hannah (Thomas) ... 91 

Glazier, Isaiah 91 

Glazier, Jonathan 28, 35, 79, 91-92 

Glynn. Mary 209 

Goodail, Ebenezer 275, 277 

Goodale, Betsy (Stone) 142 

Goodale, Ezekiel 142 

Goodale, Mary M 235 

Goodenough, Edmond 114 

Goodenough, Martha 106 

Goodenow, Priscilla 97 

Goodspeed, Hannah (Stone) . . 143 

Goodspeed, Seth 143 

Goodwin, Colonel (of Fairfax, 

Va.) 207 

Goodwin, Kate 207 

Goodwin, Mary 208 

Gordon, Widow 45 

Gordon, Caroline T. (Pellett) 220 

Gordon, George 220 

Gough, John B 9, 199 

Gould, Edwin S. 180, 187, 203, 235- 

236 

Gould, Rev. George H 187 

Gould, Hannah (Williams) ... 187 
Gould, John Williams 180, 187-188, 

203, 235 
Gould, Mary (Henry) 180, 187, 235 

Gould, Mary Earle 188 

Gould, Nellie Melissa (Muzzy) 188 
Gould, Phebe S. (Gladding) .. 236 

Gould, Rufus 187, 23s 

Gould, Rufus Henry • 188 

Gould, Thomas 187 

Gould, William R 183 

Graham, Katie 148 

Grainger, Parley. See Granger, 

Perley 280 

Granger, Perley 160, 280 

Green Family 92-93 

Green, Adeline (Perkins) 208 

Green, Alpha 93 

Green, Anna 209 

Green, Azubah S6, 93 

Green, Bartholemew 21, 27, 92 

Green, Benjamin 93, 278 

Green, Catherine (Bryant) ... 260 



PAGE 

Green, Charles Belcher 260 

Green, Charles Sumner 176 

Green, Dorothy 71 

Green, Edwin 208 

Green, Eleanor (McMains) ... 92 

Green, Elijah 208, 260 

Green, Eliza Jane 176 

Green, Ella D 209 

Green, Ella Louisa 208 

Green, Emily (Rowe) 209 

Green, Evander H 209 

Green, Florence M 209 

Green, George E 260 

Green, George S 176 

Green, Harry W 209 

Green, Helen (Barrett) 260 

Green, Horace Marvin 208-209 

Green, Joel 208 

Green, John 25, 71, 92-93 

Green, Joseph (son of William) 93 
Green, Joseph (of Rutland) 21, 103 

Green, Josie 209 

Green, Keziah 84 

Green, Lewis Putnam 208 

Green, Lucretia (Roper) 208 

Green, Lydia (daughter of 

John) 93 

Green, Lydia F. (of Rutland) 103 

Green, Lyman Smith 176 

Green, M. Eugene 209 

Green, Mamie (Haley) 209 

Green, Marcy 93 

Green, Mary (daughter of 

Horace M.) 209 

Green, Mary (Goodwin) 208 

Green, Minnie (Davis) 209 

Green, Nellie (daughter of 

Horace M.) 209 

Green, Patrick 92 

Green, Patty 93 

Green, Phebe 71 

Green, Rhoda (French) 278 

Green, Sarah (daughter of Wil- 
liam) 93 

Green, Sarah (wife of William) 93 
Green, Sophronia (mother of 

Charles S.) 176 

Green, William 22, 29, 32, Z2, 92, 

93, 107, 130 
Green, William (son of Wil- 
liam) 93 

Grenadiers, Washington . . . 158-161 

Grimes, Wallace 142 

Gusha, Abigail (Allen) 37 



302 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Gusha, Rev. Mr Zl 

Gushee. See Gusha 

Hagar, Anna (Bullard) 48, 58, 201 

Hagar, David 58 

Hagar, Eliza 201 

Hagar, Isaac 48, 58, 201 

Hair, Robert 27, 93-94 

Haley, Mamie 209 

Hall, Ambrose Porter 168 

Hall, Betsy (White) 168 

Hall, Elizabeth 39 

Hall, Ellen G 198 

Hall, Judith 54 

Hall, Lucinda White 168 

Hall, Nathan 150 

Hall, Percival 160, 168, 280 

Hall, Percival (father of Per- 
cival) 62, 168 

Hall, Dr. Percival (of New 

Braintree) 168 

Hall, Ruth (Waterman) 150 

Hall, Sarah 104 

Hall, Susanna (Adams) 94 

Hall, Viana (White) 168 

Hall, Zaccheus (of New Brain- 
tree) 94 

Hall, Zaccheus, Jr 27, 94 

Hallowell, Elizabeth 202 

Ham, Anna Bell 249 

Hambry, Cynthia R. (Putnam) 197 

Hamilton, Jude 275, 277 

Hammond, Adaline Augusta 

(Stone) 142 

Hammond, Aurelia 237 

Hammond, Isabella 237 

Hammond, John 142 

Hammond, Susan Maria (Stone- 
Robinson) 142 

Harding, Alpheus 253 

Harding, Catherine (Wheeler) 253 

Harding, Harriet 253 

Harington, Ephraim 275, 277 

Harmon, John 23, 94-95 

Harmon, Mary (White) 95 

Harmon, Z. K 281 

Harper, Abigail (Bacon) 97 

Harper, Benjamin 27, 30, 31, 95 

Harper, Catherine (sister of 

Benjamin) 85 

Harper, Catherine. See Kath- 

aren, Katherine 85, 95, 96, 97, 
140 
Harper, Eunice 52 



Harper, George 21, 27, 31, 38, 95-96 
Harper, George (father of Ben- 
jamin) ... 52, 85, 95, 96, 97, 140 

Harper, Jean lii 

Harper, John 22, 27, 28, 31, 96 

Harper, Joseph 27, 30, 31, 95. 96-97 
Harper, Katharen. See Cath- 
erine and Katherine 85 

Harper, Katherine. See Cath- 
erine and Katharen 140 

Harper, Mary 140 

Harper, Rachel 78 

Harper, Robert 20, 27, 28, 30, 32, 
97, 129 

Harper, Ruth (Wolcott) 96 

Harper, Sarah 98 

Harper, Sarah (McFarland) .. 97 

Harper, William 78, iii, 167 

Harrington. See also Harington. 
Harrington, Anna 56, 57, 58, 59, 60 

Harrington, Carrie R 239 

Harrington, Mary A. (wife of 

John G. Crawford) 259 

Harrington, Mary A. (Gault) . 239 

Harrington, Ruth 57 

Harrington, Warren 239 

Harris, Elizabeth 134 

Hart, Ann 209 

Haskell, Achsa (Nye) 116 

Haskell, Charles L. 210, 215-216, 

219 
Haskell, Clarence Crowell .... 245 

Haskell, Edith Lucy 245 

Haskell, Eli 116 

Haskell, Elizabeth A. (Crowell) 245 

Haskell, George W 261 

Haskell, Harry Wilder 245 

Haskell, Judith (wife of Roger) 215, 
261 

Haskell, Lewis N 36, 164 

Haskell, Loring 215, 261 

Haskell, Maria (Pepper) ..245, 261 

Haskell, Mark 7, 261, 267 

Haskell, Nelson 245, 261 

Haskell, Philena (Pepper) 245, 261 

Haskell, Roger 215, 261 

Haskell, Sally (Lincoln) 215 

Haskell, Simeon 171, 215, 245, 261 
Haskell, Thomas 160, 162, 245, 261 
Haskell, Wilder Fairbank .... 245 

Hastings, Moses 275, 277 

Hatch, Nathaniel 53 

Hatfield, Elizabeth 75 

Hatfield, Joseph 275, 277 



INDEX 



303 



PAGE 

Hathaway, Thomas 275, 277 

Hayden, Anna 90 

Hayden, Charlotte 98 

Hayden, Hannah (wife of 

Uriah) 123 

Hayden, Joel 19, 22, 27, 90, 97-98, 

107, 167 
Hayden, Joel (son of Joel) ... 98 

Hayden, Joseph 98 

Hayden, Lucy (Flint) 98, 167 

Hayden, Lydia 107, 123 

Hayden, Moses 97 

Hayden, Patty 98 

Hayden, Priscilla (Goodenow) 97 

Hayden, Susanna 107 

Hayden, Uriah 123 

Hayward, Dr. Joseph Warren 244 
Hayward, Josephine Lemira .. 244 

Heath, Dorothy 74 

Helmboldt, Henrietta 217 

Helmboldt, Louisa Rheinhaltina 217 

Henderson, Abner 99 

Henderson, Daniel 19, 27, 88, 98-99 
Henderson, David ... .20, 22, 98, 99 

Henderson, Edward 99 

Henderson, Elizabeth (daugh- 
ter of Daniel) 98 

Henderson, Elizabeth (Rally) 98 
Henderson, Esther (Dean) . . . 100 
Henderson, James (of Rutland) 69, 

71, 72, 98, 99, 100 
Henderson, James, Jr. ..98, 99-100 
Henderson, Jonathan 25, 98, 99, 100 

Henderson, Joseph 99 

Henderson, Josiah 99 

Henderson, Mary (wife of 

Alexander Crawford, 2d) .. 69 
Henderson, Mary (daughter 

of James of Rutland) . . .72, 98 
Henderson, Rachel (daughter 

of James of Rutland) 69, 71, 

72, 98 

Henderson, Rachel (McFar- 

land) 100 

Henderson, Sarah (daughter of 

James of Rutland) 99 

Henderson, Sarah (Harper) 98, 99 
Henderson, Sarah (Mclntyre) 99 

Henderson, Susanna 99 

Henderson, William 98 

Henry, Mary 180, 187, 235 

Henry, Nancy 180, 203 

Henry, Nancy (French) 279 

Henry, Samuel 180, 187 



Henry, Samuel G. 180, 187, 189, 279 

Hervey, James K 190 

Hill, Mrs. Beriah (wife of 

Israel) 26, 100 

Hill, Dexter 188 

Hill, Eleanor 197 

Hill, Eliza (Prouty) 188 

Hill, Eva 189 

Hill, Huldah 244 

Hill, Inez (Berry) 189 

Hill, Israel 25, 26, loo-ioi 

Hill, John 27, loi 

Hill, Joseph. See Stephen .... loi 
Hill Joshua (grandfather of 

Julius) 188 

Hill, Joshua (of Spencer) .... 197 

Hill, Julius D 184, 188-189 

Hill, Sally (Morse) 197 

Hill, Silas 109, 168 

Hill, Stephen loi 

Hinds, Hannah 88 

Hinkley, Samuel 275, 277 

Hitchcock, John 31, loi 

Hoar, Mary 240 

Hodge, Jennett 42, 118 

Hodgkin, Betsy 108 

Hodgkin, Jonathan 108 

Holden, A. J 166, 246 

Holden, lone (Boyden) 246 

Holden, Samuel 228 

Holmes, Catherine 171 

Holmes, Charles I. See Charles 

T 281 

Holmes, Charles T. . . 160, 280, 281 

Holt, Elijah 126 

Holt, Jennie Louise 221 

Holt, Lucy (Parmenter) 126 

Holton, Olive 136 

Hooker or Hucker, John ... .25, 2^ 

Hooper, John 154 

Hooper, Ruth (Delano-Whit- 
man) 154 

How. See also Howe. 

How, Abner 270, 274, 276, 277 

How, Eunice 98 

Howard, Charles Frederick 189, 

232 
Howard, Charlotte (Adams) 189, 
232 

Howard, Ebenezer 160, 280 

Howard, John F 189, 232 

Howard, Martin 189 

Howard, Silva ^37 



304 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Howard, Vashti (wife of Mar- 
tin) 189 

Howe. See also How. 

Howe, Arathusa (Ruggles) ... 136 

Howe, Artemas 59, 116 

Howe, Dulcinea 116 

Howe, Harriet (Macomber- 

Fales) no 

Howe, Harriet (Ruggles) 136 

Howe, Levi no 

Howe, Richard 136 

Howe, Ruth 188 

Howell, Adelbert 216, 217 

Howell, Amelia Elizabeth .... 217 
Howell, Amelia Elizabeth 

(Keating) 216 

Howell, Charles Leander 217 

Howell, Eva Dell (Mason) ... 217 
Howell, Francis Jacob .. ..216, 217 

Howell, Frederick Silas 217 

Howell, Grace Elizabeth 217 

Howell, Henrietta (Helmboldt) 217 
Howell, Katherine (Vaughan) 217 

Howell, Katherine May 217 

Howell, Laura Jeannette 217 

Howell, Louisa Rheinhaltina 

(Helmboldt) 217 

Howell, Silas Jacob . ..210, 216-217 

Howland, Anna S 230 

Hubbard, Christian 80 

Hubbard, Ruth 113 

Hubbard, Thomas 140 

Hucker, John. See Hooker. 

Hudson, Enos 25, 101-103 

Hudson, Hepsibah (wife of 

Joseph) loi 

Hudson, Joseph 22, 33, ipi 

Hudson, Patie (Brown) ...102, 103 

Hudson, Patience 103 

Hudson, Rebekah 103 

Hudson, Samuel Smead 103 

Humphrey, Eunice 166 

Humphrey, Mariah Louise 

(Martin) 232 

Humphrey, Nahum P. 223, 232, 234 

Humphrey, Orianna P 234 

Humphrey, Orpha (wife of Pay- 
son B. = Mrs. Fiske) .... 233 
Humphrey, Payson Brainerd 232- 
233 

Hunt, Bessie Newton 246 

Hunt, Blanche Eugenia (Pack- 
ard) 246 

Hunt, Charles C 103 



PAGE 

Hunt, Clarinda (Crawford) . . . 246 

Hunt, Edwin Crawford 246 

Hunt, Edwin Newton 245-246 

Hunt, George Austin . 103 

Hunt, Laura (wife of Orsamus) 245 

Hunt, Laura B 103 

Hunt, Lydia F. (Green) 103 

Hunt, Orsamus 245 

Hunt, Samuel 29, 103 

Hunt, Samuel Lyman 103 

Hunter, James 21, 27, 28, 29, 33, 
104 

Hunter, Sarah (Hall) 104 

Hunter, Sarah T 170 

Hunter, William 104 

Hunting, Daniel 281 

Hunting, George 281 

Jackson, Oliver 20, 104 

Johnson, Ada Alida 218 

Johnson, Alma lola Cunning- 
ham 218 

Johnson, Calvin 217 

Johnson, Carrie Augusta Flint 217 

Johnson, Edson Bert 218 

Johnson, Emeline Augusta 

(Wright) 217 

Johnson, Fred Dexter 217 

Johnson, James Dexter .. ..217-218 

Johnson, Jennie Ella Swallow 218 

Johnson, Patty 166 

Johnson, Rowena or Rhoena 169, 

172 

Johnson, Tabitha (Dexter) ... 217 

Johnson, William 20 

Jones, Angie P. (Stone) 197 

Jones, George 197 

Jones, Joel 171 

Jones, Sarah 127, 128, 129 

Joslin. See also Joslyn. 

Joslin, Abigail (Warner) 105 

Joslin,. Abraham ...27, 28, 104-105 

Joslin, Anna 105 

Joslin, Persis (wife of Ben- 
jamin Joslyn) 105 

Joslyn. See also Joslin. 
Joslyn, Abraham. See Joslin, 

Abraham 
Joslyn, (Miss of New Braintree, 

wife of Abraham Bell) ... 42 

Joslyn, Benjamin 19, 33, 48, 105 

Joslyn, George B 234 

Joslyn, James 233 

Joslyn, Joseph 233-234 



INDEX 



305 



PAGE 

Joslyn, Joseph (grandfather of 

Joseph) 233 

Joslyn, Marshall 234 

Joslyn, Nabby (wife of Joseph) 233 
Joslyn, Orianna P. (Humphrey) 234 

Josyln, Payson H 234 

Josyln, Sarah 48 

Joslyn, Sophie (Stebbins) .... 234 

Keating, Amelia Elizabeth .... 216 
Keene, Laura E. (Morton- 
Shannon) 254 

Keene, S. Franklin 254 

Keep, Abigail Elizabeth . . .202, 203 

Keep, Josiah 202 

Keep, Lucy (Tucker) 202 

Keep, William E 55 

Keith, Charles 48, 222 

Kelley, Henry 141 

Kelley, Lucretia (Stone) 141 

Kelley, Richard 98 

Kenney, John 26, 105 

Kenney, Rebecca 185 

Kent, Georgia Lavinia 249 

Kidder, Enoch 189 

Kidder, Jean 181 

Kimball, Eliza Jane (Green) . . 176 

Kimball, Emily (Parker) 178 

Kimball, F. P 176 

Kimball, Frances C. (Woods) 178 

Kimball, Rev. James 43. 1/8 

Kimball, Sophronia 229 

Kimball, William Bird 178-179 

Kingsley, Lucy (Waterman) .. 150 

Kingsley, Samuel 150 

Knight, Abbie E. (Chase) 230 

Knight, Abiah E. (Richmond) 230 
Knight, Ann (daughter of Silas) 106 

Knight, Anna (Eames) 105, 106 

Knight, Anna S. (Howland) .. 230 

Knight, Arathusa 106 

Knight, Benjamin 23, 105-106, 275, 

277 

Knight, Benjamin (son of Ben- 
jamin) 106 

Knight, Benjamin Franklin 

(son of Silas) 106 

Knight, Betty 106 

Knight, Charles A. H. (eldest 

son of Charles S.) 230 

Knight, Charles Lester (young- 
est son of Charles S.) 231 

Knight, Charles S 107, 230-231 

Knight, Cora B 231 



PAGE 

Knight, David 106 

Knight, Frank 230 

Knight, Fred 230 

Knight, Hannah (wife of Ben- 
jamin) 106 

Knight, Harriet W 165 

Knight, Hiram (son of Silas) 106 
Knight, Hiram (brother of 

Charles S.) 230 

Knight, Ina L (Richardson) . . 231 
Knight, James A. (of 44th 

Infantry) 107 

Knight, James Arthur (son of 

Charles S.) 231 

Knight, Jennie L 231 

Knight, Joseph 106 

Knight, Joshua Lawrence. See 

Knight, Charles S 230 

Knight, Louesa A. (Edwards) 230 

Knight, Louesa May 231 

Knight, Martha (Goodenough) 106 
Knight, Mary (daughter of 

Silas) 106 

Knight, Mary (wife of Daniel 

Parmenter) 122 

Knight, Mehitabel 189 

Knight, Molly (daughter of 

Benjamin) 106 

Knight, Pattie 106 

Knight, Perces 106 

Knight, Prince 106 

Knight, Ruth W 230 

Knight, Samuel 105, 106 

Knight, Silas 105. 106-107, 230 

Knight, Silas, Jr 106, 165, 230 

Knight, Thomas Jefferson .... 106 
Knights, Benjamin. See 

Knight, Benjamin. 

Kubler, Jacob 29, 107 

Kubler, Susanna (Hayden) ... 107 

Kunze, Irnia Iniogene 263 

Kunze, Ralph Glen 263 

Kunze, Rollin 263 

Kunze, Susan (Robinson) 263 

Labaree, President Benjamin 151 
Labaree, Susanna (Freeman) 151 

Laniond, Ruth 82, 83. 84, 85 

Lamson, Jonathan 275, 277 

Larrabee, Ira 254 

Larrabee, Mary Jane 254 

Leach, Alice ^32 

Leathers, Sarah 252 



3o6 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Lee, (husband of Ruth E. 

Pellett) 219 

Lee, Ruth E. (Pellett) 219 

Legg, Hannah 128 

Leonard, Cloe (Allen) ^^ 

Leonard, Jonas 37 

Leonard, Maria F 186 

Lilley, Caroline A 205 

Lincoln, Abner 109, 171 

Lincoln, Alonzo 6 

Lincoln, Mrs. Alonzo 186 

Lincoln, Betsey (daughter of 

Loved) 108 

Lincoln, Betsey (daughter of 

Stephen) 109 

Lincoln, Betsey (Brooks) .... 168 
Lincoln, Betsey (Hodgkin) ... 108 

Lincoln, Charlotte 108 

Lincoln, Cyrus 108 

Lincoln, Elizabeth (Robinson) 107, 

108 
Lincoln, Elizabeth Wilder .... 168 

Lincoln, Hannah 109 

Lincoln, Horace W 71 

Lincoln, Justus 109 

Lincoln, Gov. Levi 39. 256 

Lincoln, Levi (son of Loved) 108 
Lincoln, Levi (son of Stephen) 109 

Lincoln, Louisa 109 

Lincoln, Loved 30, 107-108 

Lincoln, Mrs. Loved (of New 

Braintree) 108 

Lincoln, Lucy 109 

Lincoln, Lurany 108 

Lincoln, Lydia (daughter of 

Stephen) 109 

Lincoln, Lydia (Foster) ...109, 168 
Lincoln, Martha Ward 

(Skerry) 168 

Lincoln, Mary 109 

Lincoln, Michael .... 160, 280, 281 
Lincoln, Michell. See Michael 281 
Lincoln, Nathaniel (son of 

Loved) 108 

Lincoln, Nathaniel, Jr. (father 

of Loved) 107, 108 

Lincoln, Rufus 108 

Lincoln, Sally (daughter of 

Loved) 108 

Lincoln, Sally (daughter of 

Stephen) 109,215 

Lincoln, Stephen 30, 107, 108-109, 

168, 215, 222 



PAGE 

Lincoln, Stephen, Jr. 109, 125, 158, 

160, 168, 280 

Lincoln, S. & W 168 

Lincoln, Thomas 108 

Lincoln, William 168 

Lincoln & Ayres 196 

Linthurst, June A 240 

Little, Abigail Willis 37 

Little, Capt. Benjamin 2)7 

Little, Hannah (Allen) 37 

Loring, Arthur L 262 

Loring, Augustus 261 

Loring, Chloe (Draper) 261 

Loring, Elizabeth (Moore) ... 261 

Loring, Frank Eugene 261-262 

Loring, Thomas 261 

Lots, original. See Town Lots. 

Lovell, Abbie F 227 

Lovell, David 189, 190 

Lovell, David Oscar . . 184, 189-190 

Lovell, Deborah 67 

Lovell, Emily S. (Mills) 191 

Lovell, Ernest Mills 191 

Lovell, Hannah (Osborn) 189, 190 
Lovell, Jonathan (father of 

David) 189 

Lovell, Jonathan (brother of 

David) 227 

Lovell, Leonard P 6 

Lovell, Lorenzo Knight . . . 183, 190 

Lovell, Mary Eleanor 191 

Lovell, Mary T. (Young) 191 

Lovell, Mehitabel (Knight) ... 189 

Lovell, Sarah Emily 191 

Lovell, William Stone 191 

Lyon, Alvin 278, 279 

Lyon, Philena (French) 278 

Lyon, Mrs. Rebeckah (wife of 

James Black) 46 

Lyon, Sarah (French) 279 

Macomber, A. Josephine 206 

Macomber, Abigail (daughter 

of John J.) 207, 208 

Macomber, Abigail (Padelford, 

wife of John of Taunton) 109 

Macomber, Abigail Fobes 

(Packard) no, 205, 206, 208, 218, 
236 

Macomber, Abigail G. (daugh- 
ter of John of '76) 1 10 

Macomber, Arthur 219 

Macomber, Bertrand 219 



INDEX 



307 



PAGE 

Macomber, Betsey (daughter 

of John of '76) 1 10 

Macomber, Betsey (Robinson) no 

Macomber, Calvin Dean no 

Macomber, Clara J. (Parker). 219 

Macomber, Clarence 219 

Macomber, Edwin 207 

Macomber, Eliza (Crawford)., no 
Macomber, Ella (Forhay) .... 206 
Macomber, George (son of 

John of '61) 206 

Macomber, George (son of 

William) 219 

Macomber, George B. 69, 71, 206- 

207, 218 
Macomber, George Garfield 

(second son of John of '61) 206 
Macomber, Harriet (daughter 

of John of '76) 1 10 

Macomber, Harriet (Doane, 

wife of John of '61) 206 

Macomber, Henry I. 69, 71, 207, 

210, 218 
Macomber, James (son of John 

of '61) 206 

Macomber, James Packard 69, 71, 

207, 218, 236-237 
Macomber, John (of 1643) .... 109 
Macomber, John (of Taunton, 

father of John of '76) .... 109 
Macomber, John (of '76) 109-110, 

206 
Macomber, John (of '61) 69, 71, 

205-206, 207, 218 
Macomber, John (son of John 

of '61) 206 

Macomber, John Jarvis no, 162, 

20s, 206, 207, 208, 218, 236 
Macomber, Kate (Goodwin) . . 207 

Macomber, Lewis no 

Macomber, Luther (son of 

John of '76) no 

Macomber, Luther (son of 

John Jarvis) 207 

Macomber, Lydia no 

Macomber, Mary (daughter of 

John of '76) no 

Macomber, Mary (Dean, wife 

of John of '76) no 

Macomber, Nellie 206 

Macomber, Onata 219 

Macomber, Paul 219 

Macomber, Philip no 

Macomber, Pliny no 



PAGE 

Macomber, Ralph 219 

Macomber, Sadie 219 

Macomber, Sumner no 

Macomber, WilUam 69, 71, 207, 

2i8-2ig 
Macomber & Conant's Orchestra 7 

Mann, Hannah 125 

Mann, Thomas ...51, 117, 130, 131 

Marble, Joseph 275, 277 

Marn, Sylvester. See Morse, 

Sylvester 281 

Marriages of Civil War Soldiers 264 

Marsh, Elias, Jr 160, 169, 280 

Marsh, Elias, Sr 169 

Marsh, Esther (Berry) 169 

Marsh, Julia Ann 169, 172 

Marsh, Kelley. See Marsh, 
Richard Kelley 

Marsh, Luther 169 

Marsh, Maria (Buss) 169 

Marsh, Maria Augusta 169 

Marsh, Martha Elmira 169 

Marsh, Mary Houghton 169 

Marsh, Rebeckah Mason 169 

Marsh, Richard Kelley 160, 169, 
172, 280 

Marsh, Oscar Ferdinand 169 

Marsh, Rowena or Rhoena 

(Johnson) 169, 172 

Marsh, Sophronia Berry 169 

Martin, Mariah Louise 232 

Mason, Eva Dell 217 

Maynard. Abigail Elizabeth 

(Keep-Wood) 202 

Maynard, Aniasa 113, 126 

Maynard, Artemas 237 

Maynard, Aurelia (Hammond) 237 
Maynard, Caroline Maria (Tay- 
lor) 237 

Maynard. Dolly H. (Smith- 
Temple) 198 

Maynard, Dora Meliiida (Per- 

ham) 238 

Maynard, Ephraim n3 

Maynard, Ezra 237 

Maynard, Francis ..29, 33. 113, 237 
Maynard, Francis (son of 

Francis) lU 

Maynard, Hervey 202 

Maynard, Marion 238 

Maynard, Marcy n3 

Maynard. Moley (Parmenter) 126 

Maynard, Naomi 113 

Maynard, Patty 1 13 



3o8 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Maynard, Polly 113 

Maynard, Ruth 113 

Maynard, Ruth (Hubbard) ... 113 

Maynard, Sally 113 

Maynard, Samuel 198, 209 

Maynard, Serviah (Wright) .. 113 

Maynard, Simon 113 

Maynard, William Henry . .237-238 
Maynard, William Henry (son 

of William H.) 238 

McAllister, Sarah 189, 231 

McClanathan, C. P IS3 

McClellen, Polly 167 

McCluer, Nicolas 274, 277 

McCobb, Aaron 20, i lo-i 1 1 

McCobb, Fanny 112 

McCobb, Mary (Crawford) no, 
112 

McCobb, William no. 112 

McFarland, Alexander 52, 90, 97, 

100, III 
McFarland, Alexander, Jr. 20, iii 

McFarland, Daniel 42 

McFarland, Jean (Harper) ... in 
McFarland, Margaret (McFar- 
land) in 

McFarland, Patty (Bell) 42 

McFarland, Polly (Bell) 42 

McFarland, Rachel 100 

McFarland, Rebecca 52 

McFarland, Reuben 30, in 

McFarland, Sarah 97 

McFarland, Walter 42 

McGilligan, Matthew ...21, 25, 112 

McHerrin, Elizabeth 112 

McHerrin, Fanny (McCobb) .. 112 

McHerrin, James 19, 20, 112 

McHerrin, Mary 112 

McHerrin, Peggy 112 

Mclntyre, Grace 45 

Mclntyre, Janet 90 

Mclntyre, John 45 

Mclntyre, Mary 45 

Mclntyre, Sarah 99 

McLoud, Rachel (wife of James 

W. Caldwell) 256 

McMains, Azubah 39, 40 

McMains, Nellie 92 

McMains, Robert 40, 92 

Mead, Martha A 227 

Medcalf, Samuel 274, 277 

Memorial Hall 5 

Memorial Tablets g 

Merriam, Abigail Willis (Little) 37 



PAGE 

Merriam, George 37 

Merrick, Alice I35 

Merrifield, James A 202 

Merrifield, Sarah S 202 

Metcalf, Abigail 114 

Metcalf, Alpha 114 

Metcalf, David 114 

Metcalf, Ebenezer 113 

Metcalf, Elizabeth 114 

Metcalf, Ester 114 

Metcalf, Hannah 114 

Metcalf, Hannah (Richardson) 114 

Metcalf, Jane 114 

Metcalf, John 114 

Metcalf, Joseph 114 

Metcalf, Margaret (wife of 

Ebenezer) 113 

Metcalf, Samuel 19, 23, 28, 30, 33, 

113-114, 277 
Metcalf, Samuel (son of 

Samuel) 114 

Metcalf, Seth 55 

Metcalf, Thomas 114 

Middlebury College 151, 211 

Miles, Barzillai 221 

Miles, Mary R 221 

Miles, Sarah (Reed) 221 

Military Age 18, 264 

Militia Company 18, 21, 161 

Mills, Emily S 191 

Mills, William 191 

Minute Men 18, 19 

Monroe, Beatrice 253 

Monroe, Catherine (Cody) ... 253 
Monroe, Catherine Rowena ... 253 
Monroe, Charles Newton .... 253 
Monroe, E. Leroy (son of 

Elbert L.) 253 

Monroe, Elbert Leroy 253 

Monroe, Harold N 253 

Monroe, Harriet (Harding) . . 253 

Monroe, Hazel G 253 

Monroe, Isaac Newton ....252-253 

Monroe, Joseph 252 

Monroe, Julia (Sullivan) 253 

Monroe, Sarah (Leathers) .... 252 

Moore, Dorothy 156 

Moore, Elizabeth R 261 

Moore, Hannah (wife of John) 114 

Moore, John 27, 39, 114, 115 

Moore, Nancy 114 

Moore, Sally 282 

Moore, Sally (Rice) 282 

Moore, Sarah 83 



INDEX 



309 



Moore, William (son of John) 114 
Moore, William (father of Sally) 

282 

Morris, John E log 

Morrison, Alexander 188 

Morrison, Iris Melissa (Earle) 188 

Morse, Eliakim 244 

Morse, George 221 

Morse, Herbert S 244 

Morse, Lucinda (Pond) 244 

Morse, Moses 244 

Morse, Orra W. (Edison) .... 244 

Morse, Sabin Aldis 244 

Morse, Sally 197 

Morse, Samuel 244 

Morse, Sylvester ....160, 161, 280 

Morton, Rev. Alpha 7, 254 

Morton, Laura E 254 

Morton, Phineas 164 

Moulton, Bathsheba (French) 89 

Moulton. Daniel 89 

Mount Holyoke Colllege ..241, 242 

Mullett, Elbridge 86 

Mullett, George 160, 161, 280 

Munroe, Alice (Butler) 62 

Munroe, James 62 

Munroe, Jonas 62 

Munroe, Martha 40, 141, 143 

Murray, John "/Z, 140 

Muzzy, Edwin A 188 

Muzzy, Nellie Melissa 188 

Nelson, Alice E 178 

Nichols, Ella M. (Warren) . . . 223 

Nichols, Warren 223 

Nichols, W. Kenneth 223 

Nourse, Benjamin 168 

Nourse, Lucinda White (Hall) 168 
Noyes, Abigail (Stone-Reed) .. 248 
Noyes, Alice E. (Nelson) .... 178 

Noyes, Alvira 252 

Noyes, Azuba (Smith) 177. 205, 252 
Noyes, Caroline A. (Lilley) .. 205 

Noyes, Caroline L. P 205 

Noyes, Charles (son of Leroy 

D.) 205 

Noyes, Charles F. (son of Wil- 
liam A. F.) 178 

Noyes, Charlotte 178 

Noyes, Chester S 178 

Noyes, Clementin L. (Arnold) 205 
Noyes, Daniel (father of Leroy 
D.) 205 



Noyes, Daniel (father of 

Luther) 177 

Noyes, Denny S 248 

Noyes, Emma L. (Thompson) 205 

Noyes, Frank W 205 

Noyes, Harriet A. (Fitts) 178 

Noyes, James 177 

Noyes, Leroy D 205 

Noyes. Leroy D. (son of Leroy 

D.) 205 

Noyes, Luther 177, 205, 252 

Noyes, Mary J. (Whitehouse) 178 

No3^es, Robert D 205 

Noyes, William A. F 177-178 

Nye, Achsa 116 

Nye, Amos 117 

Nye, Azubah 92 

Nye, Benjamin 115 

Nye, Caleb 92, 114, 115, 117 

Nye, Caleb (son of Silas") .... 117 

Nye, Caroline 166 

Nye, Crocker 114, 115, 116 

Nye, David H 87, 116 

Nye, Dulcinea (Howe) 116 

Nye, Ebenezer 26, 29, 30, 31, 33, 63, 

114-116, 117, 142 
Nye, Hannah (daughter of 

Silas) 117 

Nye, Hannah (Bodfish) 92, 114, 117 

Nye, John 116 

Nye, Josiah Sturges ...31, 115. "6 

Nye, Lucretia 116, 142 

Nye, Lucy 12a 

Nye, Marcy dz, 116 

Nye, Meletiah (daughter of 

Ebenezer) 116 

Nye, Meletiah (Sturges) 115 

Nye, Nathan (grandfather of 

Ebenezer) 115 

Nye, Nathan (son of Silas) ... 117 

Nye, Parnal (Allen) ...Zl, 116, 166 

Nye, Patience (Carpenter) ... 117 

Nye, Prudence 117 

Nye, Ruth 150 

Nye, Salmon 116 

Nye, Sarah 117 

Nye, Silas 29, 117 

Nye, Silas (son of Silas) 117 

Nj'c, Temperance 115 

Nye, Timothy yj, nS. 116, 165, 166 

Nye, William A. ..87, 115, 116, 189 

O'Brien, William 117-118, 130, 131, 
146 



3IO 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Ogle, Mary M 263 

Oliver, Sarah (wife of William) 118 

Oliver, William 25, 118 

Original Lots. See Town Lots. 
Orsborn, Joseph. See Osborn, 

Joseph, Jr. 

Osborn, Anna 42 

Osborn, Hannah 189, 190 

Osborn, Jenat (wife of John) .. 118 
Osborn, Jennett (Hodge) ..42, 118 

Osborn, John 118 

Osborn, Joseph, Jr 23, 118-119 

Osborn, Joseph, Sr. 22,, 35, 42, 55. 

75, 118, 119 

Osborn, Marj'- 75 

Osburn, John. See Osborn, 

Joseph, Jr. 
Osburn, Joseph. See Osborn, 

Joseph, Sr. 

Packard, Abigail Fobes no, 205, 

206, 208, 218, 236 

Packard, Ann 238 

Packard, Blanche Eugenia . . . 246 

Packard, Caleb 120 

Packard, George 119 

Packard, Hannah 120 

Packard, Ichabod 23, 28, 1 19-120, 

129, 206, 277 

Packard, Ichabod, Jr 120 

Packard, Isaac 120 

Packard, James 6, 266, 267 

Packard, James (son of 

Ichabod) 120 

Packard, Jonathan no, 206 

Packard, Joseph 270, 274, 277 

Packard, Lucy (wife of Eben- 

ezer Edson) 80 

Packard, Lucy (Nye) 120 

Packard, Lydia 120 

Packard, Martha (daughter of 

Ichabod) 120 

Packard, Martha (wife of James 

Dunbar, Sr.) 76 

Packard, Mary (Edson) 119 

Packard, N. Wendell 228, 246 

Packard, Nathan 120 

Packard, Nathaniel 119 

Packard, Nehemiah 20, 26, 27, 28, 

29, 120-121, 238 

Packard, Parley 119, 120, 238 

Packard, Rebecca 120 

Packard, Ruth (daughter of 

Nehemiah) 120 



PAGE 

Packard, Ruth (Allen) 120 

Packard, Sally 120 

Packard, Susan (Crawford) 110,206, 

207 
Packard, Susanna (daughter of 

Nehemiah) 120, 136 

Padelford, Abigail 109 

Palmer, Samuel 275, 277 

Paquin, Charles, Jr 198 

Paquin, Etta M. (Stone) 198 

Parker, Aaron 192, 193, 194 

Parker, Dr. Charles Edwin . . . 192 

Parker, Charles H 192-193, 194 

Parker, Clara J 219 

Parker, David 249 

Parker, Edith May 193 

Parker, Edwin S 192, 193-194 

Parker, Eliza (of Warren) 181, 182, 

256 

Parker, Emily 178 

Parker, Emma E. (Clark) .... 193 

Parker, Frank Eugene 193 

Parker, Freddie Davidson .... 193 

Parker, George Lyman 193 

Parker, Gertrude Annette 194 

Parker, Gertrude E. (Walker) . 193 

Parker, Hannah H 37, 165 

Parker, Harriet Ann 249 

Parker, Lillian (Robinson) ... 193 

Parker, Lizzie Snow 194 

Parker, Lucy A. (Barr) 192 

Parker, Lyman N 184, 192, 194 

Parker, Mary (Parmenter) ... 192 

Parker, Nellie (Davis) 192 

Parker, Rosa W 193 

Parker, Sarah or Sara Jewett 192, 

248 
Parker, Sophronia (Town- 

Frink) 193 

Parker, Susannah (wife of 

Aaron) 192, 193, 194 

Parker, Walter 193 

Parker, William Henry 192 

Parker & Whiting, 216, 217 

Parkman, W. H 227 

Parks, Nancy 180, 241, 251 

Parlin, Hannah 87 

Parmenter Family 121-127 

Parmenter, Aaron 47, 121, 124, 169 

Parmenter, Aaron, Jr 121 

Parmenter, Anna (daughter of 

Aaron) 47, 121 

Parmenter, Anne (daughter of 

Daniel) 122 



INDEX 



311 



Parmenter, Betty (eldest 

daughter of Solomon) 126 

Parmenter, Betty (fourth 

daughter of Solomon) 126 

Parmenter, Daniel (son of Wil- 

Ham) 21, 28, 33, 98, 121-122 

Parmenter, Daniel (son of 

Aaron) 121 

Parmenter, Daniel, Tr. (son of 

Daniel) 122 

Parmenter, Deborah (wife of 

Solomon) 125 

Parmenter, Edmund .. 125 

Parmenter, Elijah 125 

Parmenter, Elizabeth (Craige)' 122 

126 ' 

Parmenter, Elizabeth (Furness) 123 
Parmenter, Elizabeth (Mann) 125 

Parmenter, Ezra 125 

Parmenter, Grace ., 126 

Parmenter, Hannah (daughter 

of Aaron) 121 

Parmenter, Hannah (Mann,"" 

wife of Rufus) 125 

Parmenter, Isaac 25, 26, 122-123, 

126 
Parmenter, Isaiah 19, 21, 22, 27, 33, 

123 
Parmenter, Jacob 19, 20, 22, 121 

124 
Parmenter, James 25, 26, 121, 124- 

125 

Parmenter, Jean (Craige) 47, 120, 

124 
Parmenter, Jenney (Boyd) ... 127 
Parmenter, Kathrin (Dean) .. 127 

Parmenter, Lois 126 

Parmenter, Lucy (daughter of 

Rufus) 125 

Parmenter, Lucy (daughter of 

Solomon) 126 

Parmenter, Luke 125 

Parmenter, Lydia (Hayden) 107, 

123 

Parmenter, Mahittable 127 

Parmenter, Mary (daughter of 

Daniel) 122 

Parmenter, Mary (wife of Wil- 
liam H. Parker) 192 

Parmenter, Mary (Knight) ... 122 
Parmenter, Mary (Pepper) 121, 123 
Parmenter, Mary (Tower) .... 125 
Parmenter, Moley (daughter of 

Solomon) 126 



125 
122 
122 



Parmenter, Rachel 121 

Parmenter, Rebecca (daughter 

of Aaron) 121, 138 

Parmenter, Rufus .... 27 125 

Parmenter, Ruth (Bellows) . .' 124 
Parmenter, Samuel (father of 

Rufus) 125 

Parmenter, Samuel (son' of 

Daniel) 122 

Parmenter, Solomon 21, 33 122 

125-126, 169 
Parmenter, Solomon (of Sud- 
bury) 

Parmenter, Spencer '. 

Parmenter, Tamer ." 

Parmenter, Thaddeus .' . . . 123 

Parmenter, Triphosa 79 

Parmenter, William 21, 28, 79, 122, 

125, 126-127 
Parmenter, William (of Sud- 

_ bury) 121, 123 

Parmenter, William (son of 

Daniel) 122 

Parmenter, Winser 123 

Partridge, Adin 128 

Partridge, Asa 21, 29, 31, 33 127- 

128, 15s 
Partridge, Asa (son of Asa) . . 128 

Partridge, Bernard 128 

Partridge, Calista 128 

Partridge, Chloe 128 

Partridge, Edward, ist (of Med- 

field) 127. 128, 129 

Partridge, Edward, 2d 22, 27, 33, 
79. 128-129 

Partridge, Edward, 3d 128 

Partridge, Elias 128 

Partridge, Frederick 128 

Partridge, Hannah (daughter 

of Edward, 2d) 128 

Partridge, Hannah (Legg) ... 128 

Partridge, John 128 

Partridge, Katherin 128 

Partridge, Lurana 128 

Partridge, Mary 128 

Partridge, Olive 128 

Partridge, Pamela 123 

Partridge, Rachel (daughter of 

Asa) 128 

Partridge, Rachel (Banister) .. 128 

Partridge, Reuben 128 

Partridge, Sarah (daughter of 
Asa) 128 



312 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



FACE 

Partridge, Sarah (daughter of 

Edward, 2d) 128 

Partridge, Sarah (Jones) 127, 128, 

129 

Partridge, Sarah (Pray) 129 

Partridge, Silas ....22, 29, 128, 129 

Partridge, William 127 

Pellett, Benjamin C 220 

Pellett, Caroline T 220 

Pellett, Ellen E. (Davis) 220 

Pellett, Elonzo W 220 

Pellett, Frederick B 220 

Pellett, Hannah E 219 

Pellett, Henry L 220 

Pellett, Herbert 220 

Pellett, Joseph A 220 

Pellett, Leonard W 220 

Pellett, Lewis E 220 

Pellett, Lewis T 219-220 

Pellett, Ruth E 219 

Pellett, Ruth E. (Chamberlain) 219, 

220 
Peloubet, Rev. F. N. 7, 11, 243, 266 
Pendleton, Ada Maria (Shedd) 240 
Pendleton, Charles Hiram .... 240 

Pendleton, Emma 241 

Pendleton, Helen Elizabeth ... 240 

Pendleton, John A 240 

Pendleton, Lizzie Jane 240 

Pendleton, Mary Belle 240 

Pendleton, Ray Arthur 240 

Pendleton, Rena Jane 240 

Pendleton, Rex Walter 240 

Penniman, Henry 37 

Penniman, Lucy (Allen) zi 

Pepper, Miss (wife of James 

Blair, Sr.) 47 

Pepper, Ashbel 160, 280 

Pepper, Jacob, Jr 160, 280 

Pepper, John 245, 261 

Pepper, Maria 245 

Pepper, Mary 121, 123 

Pepper, Philena 261 

Perham, Dora Melinda 238 

Perkins, Adeline 208 

Perkins, Alice (Leach) 132 

Perkins, Anna P. (Gibbs) 209 

Perkins, Asa 41 

Perkins, Benjamin 30, 129-130 

Perkins, Benjamin (probably 

son of Benjamin) 129 

Perkins, David (father of 

Zephaniah) 132 



PAGE 

Perkins, David (of Bridge- 
water) 129, 132 

Perkins, George 31, 117, 130-131, 

146 
Perkins, Hepzibah (Washburn) 129, 
130 

Perkins, Horatio 208 

Perkins, John 132 

Perkins, Leavitt 31, 129, 132 

Perkins, Lydia (Sprague) .... 129 
Perkins, Mary (Ford) ..26, 71, 132 
Perkins, Solomon (father of 

Benjamin) 129 

Perkins, Solomon (son of 

above Solomon) 129 

Perkins, Zephaniah 20, 21, 25, 26, 
71, 132 

Perry, Mary Elizabeth 194 

Pierce, Marietta 232 

Pike, Elisha 25, 133 

Pinney, Evelyn N 228 

Poland, Addie Lione (Foster) 204 

Poland, Albert W 204 

Poland, Annis 227 

Poland, Mrs. Lizzie J. (wife of 

Sylvander Bothwell) 227 

Pond, Eli 244 

Pond, Huldah (Hill) 244 

Pond,- Lucinda 244 

Pope, Asa 133 

Pother, Theophulas 275, 277 

Potter & Allen 164 

Powers, Sarah 44 

Powers, William 255 

Pratt, Elizabeth (Brown) 56 

Pratt, George W 204 

Pratt, Lillie Belle (Frink) .... 204 

Pratt, Mr 56 

Pratt, Ruth (Whitman) 154 

Pratt, Seth, Jr 154 

Pratt, Seth, Sr 154 

Pray, Sarah 129 

Preshoe, Betsy (Robinson) .. 135 

Preshoe, William 68, yy 

Preshoe, Zadoc 135 

Prouty, Alanson 6, 188 

Prouty, Eliza 188 

Prouty, Gardner 188 

Prouty, Mrs. Huldah (wife of 

James Forbes) 84 

Prouty, Ruth (Howe) 188 

Prouty, Sally 51 

Putnam, Cynthia R 197 



INDEX 



313 



PAGE 

Radcliffe College 246 

Rally, Elizabeth . . . ._ 98 

Rawson, Abbie Maria 221 

Rawson, Annie F 221 

Rawson, Clarissa (Fairbank) 220, 

226 

Rawson, Clarissa E 221 

Rawson, Daniel (father of 

Daniel) 220, 226 

Rav/son, Daniel 220-221, 226 

Rawson, Emily A 221 

Rawson, Emma 226 

Rawson, Frank 226 

Rawson, George H 226 

Rawson, Herbert 226 

Rawson, Joseph 226 

Rawson, Laban F 226 

Rawson, Levi 220 

Rawson. Mary (Bullen) 226 

Rawson, Rachel (wife of 

Daniel = Mrs. Whitte- 

more) 221 

Raymond, Sophronia 193, 204 

Read, Thomas, Jr 169 

Recruiting, Method of 175 

Reed, Abigail (Stone) 248 

Reed, Alice Louise 248 

Reed, Alice Louise (Singer) .. 248 

Reed, Alice M. (Bullard) 249 

Reed, Rev. Andrew H 221, 248 

Reed, Anna Bell (Ham) 249 

Reed, Arthur Knowlton 249 

Reed, Barzillai Miles . .210, 221-222 

Reed, Ben Brigham 249 

Reed, Bert Shannon 249 

Reed, Bertha Florence (Ams- 

den) 248 

Reed, Charlie Macullar 249 

Reed, Cheney 221 

Reed Corner 248 

Reed, Dorothy Arline 249 

Reed, Edmund (1781) 33 

Reed, Edmund (father of 

George E.) 248 

Reed, Eleanor (wife of Silas) 248 

Reed, Ernest George 248 

Reed, Eugene Williams 249 

Reed, Frank Ellsworth 248 

Reed, Fred Edmund 192, 248 

Reed, George Edmund 247, 248-249 

Reed, George Walter 248 

Reed, Georgia Lavinia (Kent) 240 

Reed, Grace May 248 

Reed, Hazel Eleanor 249 



PAGE 

Reed, Herbert Bent 248 

Reed, Herbert Merritt 249 

Reed, Jennie Louise (Holt) . . 221 

Reed, Leroy Kendall 221 

Reed, Lewis H 221 

Reed, Mary E. (Foster) 221 

Reed, Mary R. (Miles) 221 

Reed, Miles. See Barzillai 

Miles Reed. 
Reed, Rose Pauline (Wollen- 

haupt) 221 

Reed, Sara Amanda (Williams) 248 
Reed, Sarah (wife of Barzillai 

Miles of Rutland) 221 

Reed, Sarah or Sara Jewett 

(Parker) 192, 248 

Reed, Silas 221, 248 

Reed, Susan Elizabeth 221 

Reed, William Leroy 221 

Regiments in Civil War. See 

pp. ix, X. 

Regiments in Revolutionary War 

(designated by names of Colonels) 

Alden, Ichabod 24 

Bailey, John 149 

Bradford, Gamaliel 30 

Brewer, David 20 

Brewer, Samuel 22 

Brooks, John 24 

Converse, James 23 

Crane, John 25 

Gushing, Job 28 

Denny, Samuel 31 

Drury, Luke 32 

Fellows, John 19 

Francis, Ebenezer 109 

Jackson. Henry 25 

Keyes, Danforth 27 

Learned. Ebenezer 20 

Lee, William R 25 

Nixon, Thomas 25 

Putnam. Rufus 25 

Rand, John 31 

Tupper, Benjamin 118 

Turner, William 32, 133 

Tyler, Nathan 31 

Shepard. William 131 

Smith, Calvin 78. 118 

Ward. Jonathan 20, 77 

Warner, Jonathan 10 

Wesson. James 25 

Whitcomb, Asa 22 

Whitney, Josiah 26, 30. 31 



3^4 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Regulars, British, enlistment of 117, 

130, 146 

Revolution, Authorities for . . 34 
Revolution, Companies in. See 

Companies. 
Revolution, Regiments in. See 

Regiments. 

Rice, Benjamin, Jr 136 

Rice Corner 172 

Rice, Ebenezer 27, 28, 133 

Rice, Henry 172 

Rice, Isaac Davis 172 

Rice, Joseph 172 

Rice, Julia Ann (Marsh-Rice). 172 

Rice, Mary (wife of Joseph) .. 172 

Rice, Philena (Ruggles) 136 

Rice, Rhoena Augusta 172 

Rice, Sally 282 

Rich, Elizabeth (Trask) 134 

Rich, George 27, 133, i34 

Rich, John (brother of Jonas) 134 

Rich, John (father of Jonas) . . I33 

Rich, Jonas ...27, 31, 133. i34, 138 

Rich, Jonas (son of Jonas) 92, 

133. 134 

Richardson, Hannah 114 

Richardson, Ina 1 231 

Richardson, Jonathan 115, 275, 277 

Richardson, Temperance (Nye) 115 

Richardson, Ursula 166 

Richmond, Abiah E 230 

Richmond, Abigail 229 

Richmond, Mercie 151 

Richmond, Weltha 62 

Ripley, Allen 151 

Ripley, Hannah (French) .... 278 

Ripley, Jeptha 93, I07 

Ripley, Nancy (Weeks) 151 

Ripley, Zenas 278 

Robinson, Abraham Fay 135, 262- 

263 

Robinson, Albert Dennison . . . 195 

Robinson, Arthur Charles .... 19S 

Robinson, Beauford F 263 

Robinson, Bertha E 263 

Robinson, Betsey (daughter of 

John, 2d) 135 

Robinson, Betsey (wife of 

John Macomber of '76) .. no 

Robinson, Carl D 263 

Robinson, Catherine 135 

Robinson, Charles D 194-195 

Robinson, Charles F 263 

Robinson, Charlotte (Noyes) . 178 



PAGE 

Robinson, Elizabeth 107, 108 

Robinson, George Perez 195 

Robinson, Hattie Louise 195 

Robinson, Hattie S 263 

Robinson, Hazel Dorothy .... 242 

Robinson, Increase, Jr 108 

Robinson, Jeremiah 135 

Robinson, John, ist 134 

Robinson, John, 2d i34-i35. I43, 170 

171, 208, 211, 262 
Robinson, Col. John, 3d 135, 142, 

262 
Robinson, John (son of Wil- 
liam) 242 

Robinson, John (son of Walter) 242 
Robinson, John W. (son of 

Abraham F.) 263 

Robinson, Julia M. (Boyden) . 135 

Robinson, Letha Hazel 263 

Robinson, Lilla Bell (Spooner) 242 

Robinson, Lillian 193 

Robinson, Lucy M. (Walker) . 195 

Robinson, Lurana 135, 210 

Robinson, Lydia (Warren) ... 134 
Robinson, Lydia (Young) .... 263 

Robinson, Marshall P 194 

Robinson, Martha H 197, 254 

Robinson, Mary (Ball) 263 

Robinson, Mary (Bullard) 135 

Robinson, Mary (Ogle) 263 

Robinson, Mary Elizabeth 

(Perry) 194 

Robinson, Mary Geneva 263 

Robinson, Mary Lizzie 195 

Robinson, Mehitabel 

(Williams) 108 

Robinson, Peter 135 

Robinson, Polly 135 

Robinson, Ruth Hathaway 

(Egery) 242 

Robinson, Sally 135, 143, 170 

Robinson, Susan B. (daughter 

of William) 208 

Robinson, Susan M. (daughter 

of Abraham F.) 263 

Robinson, Susan Maria (Stone) 135, 

142, 262 
Robinson, Susan or Susannah 13S, 

142 
Robinson, Susannah (Fay) 135, 143 
Robinson, Sylvia May Daphene 242 

Robinson, Thaddeus I35 

Robinson, Thomas M 178 



INDEX 



315 



PAGE 

Robinson, Walter M. (son of 

John) 149, 242 

Robinson, Walter M. (son of 

Abraham F.) 263 

Robinson, William (of Water- 
town) 134 

Robinson, William (son of 

John, 2d) 135, 208 

Rockwood, Charlotte 52, 226 

Rockwood, Electa 52 

Rood, Nathan 277 

Roper, Lucretia 208 

Ross, Ann (Packard) 238 

Ross, Ansel 238 

Ross, David Sumner 238 

Ross, Eliza J. (Skipper) 239 

Ross, Elsie Louise 239 

Ross, Frank Eugene 239 

Ross, George Marshall .... 238-239 

Ross, Hannah (Crowell) 238 

Ross, Jennie Eliza 239 

Ross, John 238 

Ross, Mary Anna 239 

Rowe, Emily 209 

Rude or Rood, Nathan 275, 277 

Ruggles, Alice (Merrick) .... 135 

Ruggles, Arathusa 136 

Ruggles, Benjamin 135 

Ruggles, Charlotte 136 

Ruggles, Hannah 136 

Ruggles, Hannah (Winslow) 135, 
136 

Ruggles, Harriet 136 

Ruggles, Joshua 136 

Ruggles, Miriam 136 

Ruggles, Olive (Holton) 136 

Ruggles, Philena 136 

Ruggles, Reuel 136 

Ruggles, Rhoda 136 

Ruggles, Seraph Howe 136 

Ruggles, Susannah (Packard) 136 

Ruggles, Thomas 135-136 

Ruggles, Thomas, Jr 136 

Ruggles, Willard 136 

Russell, Charlotte Emily 251 

Russell, Orlando 121, 251 

Russell, W. W 166 

Sanford, Bathsheba (French). 89 

Sanford, Philo 89 

Sargeant, Asa S I95. 239 

Sargeant, Carrie R. (Harring- 
ton) 239 

Sargeant, Charles A I95, 239 



PAGE 

Sargeant, Edward Josiah 14, 195- 

196, 239 
Sargeant, Eunitia D. (Wright) 195 
Sergeant, Herbert Edward ... 195 

Sargeant, James 239 

Sargeant, Levander D 195, 239 

Sargeant, Lillian R. (Webster) 196 

Sargeant, S. M 239 

Sargeant. Susan (Brown) 195, 239 

Saville, Lucy 253 

Shannon, James Griswold 6, 14, 

253-254 
Shannon, Laura E. (Morton) . 254 

Shannon, Lucy (Saville) 253 

Shattuck, Caleb 103 

Shaw, Andrew 137 

Shaw, Anna (wife of Andrew) 137 

Shaw, David 31, 136 

Shaw, Hayden 88, 278, 279 

Shaw, James 30, 31, 136 

Shaw, James, Jr 31, 137 

Shaw, Silva (Howard) 137 

Shaw, Timothy 21, 26, 30, 137 

Shearn, Ann (Hart) 209 

Shearn, Ella L 209 

Shearn, Henry T 209 

Shearn, James 120, 209-210 

Shearn, James J 209 

Shearn, Jennie A 210 

Shearn, John 209 

Shearn, John F 209, 210 

Shearn, Katie D 209 

Shearn, M. Lizzie 209 

Shearn, Mary (Glynn) 209 

Shedd, Ada Maria 240 

Shedd, Almira H 255 

Shedd, Amy Belle 240 

Shedd, Arthur Lyman 240, 241 

Shedd, Edith May 240 

Shedd, Emma (Pendleton) ... 241 

Shedd, Harry Proctor 240 

Shedd, Hiram P 240-241 

Shedd, Israel Proctor 240 

Shedd, Jesse Edwin 240 

Shedd, June A. (Linthurst) .. . 240 
Shedd, Lizzie Jane (Pendleton) 240 
Shedd, Lydia Alvira (Barr) . . 240 

Shedd, Mary (Hoar) 240 

Shedd, Walter Edward 240 

Shedd, Walter Linthurst 240 

Sheldon, Hepsibah 88 

Sibley, Ellen 1S5 

Sibley, Sabra Wiswell 228 

Simmons, Job 182 



3i6 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Simmons, Sarah (wife of Job) 182 

Simmons, Susan A 182 

Singer, Alice Louise 248 

Skerry, Martha Ward 168 

Skerry, Samuel 168 

Skipper, Eliza J 239 

Slay ton, Samuel 275, 277 

Slocom, George i54 

Smith, Aaron 138 

Smith, Alice W 181 

Smith, Anna (daughter of 

William) 138 

Smith, Anne (of Middleboro, 

wife of Asa French) 89 

Smith, Azuba I77, 205, 252 

Smith, Brainard 227 

Smith, Dolly H 198 

Smith, Elizabeth 138 

Smith, Ephraim 138 

Smith, Farrington 138 

Smith, Grace G. (Dean) 186 

Smith, Hannah (Ruggles) .... 136 

Smith, James 138 

Smith, Joab 138 

Smith, John 138 

Smith, Mabel A. (Boyd) 22^ 

Smith, Parcis 64 

Smith, Rebecca (Parmenter) .. 138 
Smith, Rebecka (daughter of 

William) 138 

Smith, Samuel Warner 136 

Smith, Walter Shippard 186 

Smith, William 21, 23, 30, 33, 134, 

137-138 

Smith, Zerviah 146 

Snell, Asa 20, 138 

Snow, Hannah 74 

Soldiers' Union 3 

Solenbarger, Bertha (Robinson) 263 

Solenbarger, Dan 263 

Sollen, John 114 

Spear, Hannah (Conant) 66 

Spear, Luther 66 

Spooner, Albert ..139, 196-197, 222 
Spooner, Albert (son of 

Eleazer) 139 

Spooner, Almira Ann (Davis) 222 
Spooner, Andrew 3, 4, 14, 139, 180, 

222, 241-242, 255 
Spooner, Deacon Andrew (father 

of Andrew) 139, 196, 215, 222, 

241 

Spooner, Arthur Buss 109, 222 

Spooner, Benjamin 27, 138-139 



PAGE 

spooner, Benjamin (son of 

Eleazer)- 139 

Spooner, Bertha Miller 242 

Spooner, Bessie (Upham) .... 222 

Spooner, Caleb 139 

Spooner, Charles Andrew .... 222 

Spooner, Curtis Edward 196 

Spooner, Cynthia R. (Putnam- 

Hambry) 197 

Spooner, Eddie (son of Charles 

A.) 222 

Spooner, Edwin Charles 139, 222- 

223 

Spooner, Eleanor 139 

Spooner, Eleazer 28, 30, 138, 139, 

196, 215 
Spooner, Eleazer, 2d (grandson 

of above) 139 

Spooner, Elijah Blackman .... 139 
Spooner, Eliza (Dean) ....180,241 
Spooner, Ella M. or Mary E. 7, 241 

Spooner, Fannie 222 

Spooner, Flora (Blake) 242 

Spooner, Francena. See Olive 

Francena. 

Spooner, Francis Albert 242 

Spooner, Frank Edwin 222 

Spooner, George 222 

Spooner, Hattie Ann 241, 242 

Spooner, Joseph 139 

Spooner, Lilla Bell 241, 242 

Spooner, Lois 139 

Spooner, Lucien Brown ...241, 242 

Spooner, Lucius 139 

Spooner, Luther 139 

Spooner, Mabel Louise 242 

Spooner, Marion Frances ..241, 255 

Spooner, Martha Ann 222, 223 

Spooner, Mary (Brown) 241 

Spooner, Mary Brown 

(daughter of Lucien B.) . . 242 
Spooner, Mary Ella (or Ella 

M.) 7, 241 

Spooner, Mehitabel (wife of 

Benjamin) 139 

Spooner, Mehitabel (daughter 

of Eleazer) i39 

Spooner, Mehitabel (Allen) ... 139 
Spooner, Moses (son of 

Eleazer) i39 

Spooner, Moses (son of Moses) I39 
Spooner, Olive Francena ..109, 222 
Spooner, Pardon I39 



INDEX 



317 



Spooner, Polly (daughter of 

Eleazer) 139 

Spooner, Prince 139 

Spooner, Ruby 139 

Spooner, Sally (Adams) 196, 222, 

241 
Spooner, Sarah D. (Wilder) . . 222 
Spooner, Sarah Maria (Wool- 
worth) 196, 197 

Spooner, Susanna (Conant) ... 139 

Spooner, Wilfred Blake 242 

Spooner, William (of Plymouth, 

1637) 139 

Spooner, William Henry (son 

of Albert) 196 

Spooner, Winifred Grace 242 

Sprague, Lydia 129 

Starbuck, Bethiah (Waterman) 150 

Starbuck, Moses 150 

Stearnes. See also Stearns. 
Stearns, Betsy (Bent-Stone) ...223 

Stearns, Charles Daniel 223 

Stearns, Charles Haynes 223 

Stearns, Emma Maria 223 

Stearns, Isaac 223 

Stearns, Jonathan 223 

Stearns, Mary Bigelow 223 

Stearns, Melancey Dennison 

(Dean) 223 

Stebbins, Sophie 234 

Steele, Burpee 249 

Steele, Martha Jane (Walker) . 249 

Steele, Russell 250 

Sternes. See also Stearns. 

Stemes, Richard 25, 140 

Stevens, Abbie T 259 

Stevens, Phineas 259 

Stevens, Simon 259 

Stevenson, Mary (Harper) . . . 140 

Stevenson, Robert 275, 277 

Stevenson, William . . 19, 27, 29, 140 

Stillwater Campaign 28, 29 

Stone Family 140-144 

Stone, Abigail (daughter of 

Isaac, 1st) 40, 141 

Stone, Abigail (wife of Asa 

French) 89 

Stone, Abigail (wife of Edmund 

Reed, then of D. S. Noyes) 248 

Stone, Abner 141 

Stone, Achsah 143 

Stone, Adaline Augusta 142 

Stone, A. Josiah 223 

Stone, Allis 142 



PAGB 

Stone, Alpheus or Alphaeus 25, 116, 
141-142, 150, 262 

Stone, Angie P 197 

Stone, Ann Robinson 170 

Stone, Benjamin 144 

Stone, Bessie Louise (Bruce) . 229 
Stone, Betsy (daughter of 

Alpheus) 142 

Stone, Betsy (Bent) 223 

Stone, Claracy 143 

Stone, Clarence A 229 

Stone, Daniel 144 

Stone, Delia 204 

Stone, Eleanor (Hill) 197 

Stone, Electa 141 

Stone, Ellen G. (Hall) 198 

Stone, Emerson 190 

Stone, Etta M 198 

Stone, Eva A 254, 255 

Stone, Frank H 254-255 

Stone, Frederick Munroe 141 

Stone, George Fred Washington 198 
Stone, George Washington 6, 14, 

143, 170, 184, 197-198, 211, 254, 

262 

Stone, Gladys M 255 

Stone, Grace M 254 

Stone, Hannah (daughter of 

Isaac, 2d) 143 

Stone, Hannah (Bullard) 143, 167, 

169 

Stone, Harold J 255 

Stone, Harriot 142 

Stone, Henry W 198 

Stone, Ira W 254 

Stone, Isaac, ist 22, 28, 32, 33, 40, 

140-141, 143, 169, 197 
Stone, Isaac, 2d 19, 20, 25, 106, 141, 

143, 167, 169, 197 
Stone, Isaac, 3d 135, 143, 160, 169- 

170, 197, 281 
Stone, John (son of Isaac, 2d) 143 
Stone, John E. 14, 143, I99, 254-255 

Stone, Louisa 142 

Stone, Lucretia (daughter of 

Alpheus) 142 

Stone, Lucretia (daughter of 

Isaac, 1st) 141 

Stone, Lucretia (Nye) 116, 142 

Stone, Luke 141 

Stone, Lucy (daughter of 

Alpheus) 142, 150 

Stone, Martha (Munroe) 40, 141, 

143 



3i8 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Stone, Martha H. (Robinson) 197. 

254 
Stone, Mary (daughter of 

Samuel) i44 

Stone, Mary E. (daughter of 

George W.) 198 

Stone, Mary Jane (Larrabee) . 254 

Stone, Otis I35, 142 

Stone, Pattee (daughter of 

Isaac, ist) 141 

Stone, Pattie (Bullard) 141 

Stone, Patty (wife of Lot 

Conant) 167 

Stone, Polly (daughter of 

Alpheus) 142 

Stone, Prudence (wife of 

Samuel) i44 

Stone, Ralph E 254 

Stone, Sally (Robinson) 135, I43, 

170 

Stone, Salva I43 

Stone, Samuel 21, 27, 144 

Stone, Samuel (son of Isaac, 

2d) 143 

Stone, Samuel (son of Samuel) 144 

Stone, Seth 160, 281 

Stone, Silas 274, 277 

Stone, Sukey or Susan 

(daughter of Isaac, 2d) 143, 167 
Stone, Susan Maria (daughter 

of Alpheus) 135, 142, 262 

Stone, Susannah or Susan 

(Robinson) 135, 142 

Stone, Washington 143, 170, 183, 

197, 254, 266, 267 
Strickland, Pattee (Stone) .... 141 

Strickland, Rev. John 141 

Sturges, Meletiah 115 

Sullivan, Julia 253 

Swinerton, James 20, 144 

Tallis, Gertrude M 251 

Taylor, Caroline Maria 237 

Taylor, Isabella (Hammond) .. 237 

Taylor, Jessie 1 251 

Taylor, Roswell 237 

Taylor, Thomas 25, 144 

Temple, Amos 20, 144-145 

Temple, Dolly (daughter of 

Willard) 198 

Temple, Dolly H. (Smith) .... 198 

Temple, Jane 198 

Temple, Mary Ann 198 

Temple, Willard 198 



PAGE 

Temple, William 1 3, 198-199 

Tenney, David F 79 

Tenney, Samuel 166 

Thatcher, Sally 150 

Thomas, Hannah 91 

Thompson (son-in-law of 

Loved Lincoln) 108 

Thompson, Charlotte (Lincoln) 108 

Thompson, Emma L 205 

Thompson, Jane 49 

Thompson, Jane (Washburn) . 49 
Thompson, John .... 160, 161, 280 

Thompson, Joseph F 31, 145 

Thompson, Norman B 136 

Thompson, Mrs. Parmela (wife 

of Nahum Whipple) 152 

Thompson, Seraph Howe 

(Ruggles) 136 

Thompson, Thomas 49 

Thomson, William, Jr 153 

Thrasher. See also Thresher. 

Thrasher, George 168 

Thrasher, Harlow 160,281 

Thrasher, Samuel, Jr no, 160 

Thrasher, Thankful (Bangs) .. 89 
Three Months' Regiments ... I75 
Thresher. See also Thrasher. 

Thresher, Abigail 61 

Thresher, Bethiah 72 

Thresher, Mary (Macomber) . . no 
Thresher or Thrasher, Samuel, 

Jr 1 10, 160, 281 

Tidd, Grace (Mason) 165 

Tindall, Emma 258 

Tomlinson, Rev. Daniel 40, 60, 102, 

104, 142, 159, 161, 170 
Tomlinson, Daniel (son of 

Fabian) 170 

Tomlinson, Dolly 170 

Tomlinson, Fabian . . 160, 170, 281 
Tomlinson, Fabian (son of ^ 

Fabian) 170 

Tomlinson, James 170 

Tomlinson, Jane 170 

Tomlinson, Lucy (daughter of 

Fabian) 170 

Tomlinson, Lucy (Beard) .... 170 

Tomlinson, Maria 170 

Tomlinson, Nancy 170 

Tomlinson, Sarah T. (Hunter) 170 

Tomlinson, William 170 

Torry, Ezra 275, 277 

Tower, Louisa 248 

Tower, Mary 125 



INDEX 



319 



PAGE 

Town Clerk's Records 17 

Town, Daniel 193, 204 

Town Lots 

Number Two 55, 114 

Number Three 169 

Number Four 250 

Number Eight 87, 122 

Number Nine 127 

Number Ten 90, 100, 1 1 1 

Number Eleven 96, 104 

Number Twelve 140 

Number Thirteen 40, 57 

Number Fifteen 100 

Number Sixteen 79, 85 

Number Eighteen 90, 106 

Number Nineteen 88 

Number Twenty 50 

Number Twenty-one ....68, 71, "/"/ 

Number Twenty-two 120 

Number Twenty-three 94 

Number Twenty-four 73 

Number Twenty-five 121, 154, 155, 
156 

Number Twenty-six 127, 155 

Number Twenty-eight 82 

Number Twenty-nine 39 

Number Thirty 41 

Number Thirtj'-one 62, 151 

Number Thirty-two 40, 92, 93 

Number Thirtj^-three I53 

Lot AA 119 

Lot BB 45. 53, 68, 100 

Lot O 121 

Lot T (iZ, 86 

Lot W 53 

Lot X 50, 119, 129 

College Lot 38 

Town Officers during Civil War 266 
Town Officers during Revolu- 
tionary War Z^ 

Town Officers during War of 

1812 171 

Town, Sophronia Abiah . . . 193. 204 
Town, Sophronia (Raymond) 193, 

204 
Towns. See Index of Towns. 

Trask, Elizabeth I34 

Trowbridge, Charles H 128 

Trowbridge, Mrs. Charles H. 

(Davis) 220 

Tucker, Fred Lester 242 

Tucker, Lucy 202 



PAGE 

Tucker, Mary Anne (Draper). 242 

Tucker, Samuel 134 

Turner, Joseph 145 

Turner, Joshua 20, 25, 27, 145, 270, 
272, 273 

Turner, Mercy (French) 145 

Tylor, Joshua 275, 277 

Underwood, Lois (Parmenter) 126 

Underwood, Timothy 126 

University of California 241 

University of Vermont 246 

L'pham, Bessie 222 

Upham, Fannie (Spooner) .... 222 

Upham, Jacob 146 

Upham, James 27, 146 

Upham, Lillian 222 

Upham, Raynor 222 

Upham, Zerviah (Smith) 146 

Upton, Ruth 214 

Vaughan, Katherine 217 

Veazie, Bessie Isora (Walker) 249 

Waldo, John 86 

Walker, Albert Henry 249 

Walker, Asa 231 

Walker, Bertha Luella 249 

Walker, Bessie Isora 249 

Walker, Betsy M. (Whitcomb) 249 

Walker, David Parker 249 

Walker, Gertrude E I93 

Walker, Harriet Ann (Parker) 249 

Walker, John, Jr I95. 249 

Walker. Rev. John, Sr 249 

Walker, John Albert 195. 247. 249- 

250 

Walker, Lucy M I95 

Walker. Marion Maria 249 

Walker, Marshall 29, 30, 146 

Walker, Martha Jane 249 

Walker, Samuel 275, 277 

Wallis, Rachel 121. 126 

Walls, George 31, 130. 131. 146-147 

Ward, Katie (Graham) 148 

Ward, Kerly 20, 147-148 

Ward, Samuel 148 

Ware, A. Hazen \" 

Ware, Almira H. (Shedd) .... 255 

Ware, Archibald I79. I99 

Ware, Archibald H 179. 255 

Ware, Betsy (Capen) 199, 224 

Ware, Caroline Cutler 

(Cooley) 179. 255 



320 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Ware, Charles Archibald 14, 241, 

255 
Ware, Edward Franklin 179-180, 

255 

Ware, Edward Hazen 255 

Ware, Henry H. . . 184, 199-200, 224 

Ware, James B I77, I99, 224 

Ware, Lavinia (wife of Archi- 
bald) 199 

Ware, Lavinia H. (daughter of 

Archibald) I77, 255 

Ware, Marion Frances 

(Spooner-Dayton) ....241,255 

Ware, Robert Elwin 255 

Ware, William 224 

Ware, Mrs. William (Flagg) . . 224 

Warner, Abigail 105 

Warner, Daniel 160, 281 

War of 1812. Authorities for 158 

Warren, Albion W 223 

Warren, Carrie M 223 

Warren, Charles E 231 

Warren, Eber H 200, 231 

Warren, Elizabeth (Harris)... 134 

Warren, Ella M 223 

Warren, Eva F 223 

Warren, Florence B 223 

Warren, Frank E 223 

Warren, Hazel 223 

Warren, Ida M 223 

Warren, Jonathan Gibbs 184, 200, 

231 

Warren, Joshua I34 

Warren, Lydia I34 

Warren, Martha A. (Spooner) 223 
Warren, Miriam (Gibbs) ..200, 231 

Warren, Richard 134 

Warren, William 223 

Washburn, Deborah 49 

Washburn, Ezra 28, 148 

Washburn, Hepzibah 129, 130 

Washburn, Jane 49 

Washburn, Lebbeus 20, 148 

Washburn, Lucretia (Darling) . 149 

Washburn, Wealthy 76 

Washburn, William 27, 28, 31, 148- 

149 
Washington Grenadieis ....158-161 
Waterman, Abigail (daughter 

of Perez) 150 

Waterman, Abigail (wife of 

Perez) 150 

Waterman, Barnabas 150 

Waterman, Benjamin 142, 150 



PAGE 

Waterman, Bethiah 150 

Waterman, Calvin 150 

Waterman, Lucy (daughter of 

Perez) 150 

Waterman, Lucy (Stone) .142, 150 

Waterman, Lydia 150 

Waterman, Perez 149-150 

Waterman, Perez (father of 

Perez) 149 

Waterman, Ruth 150 

Waterman, Sally (Thatcher).. 150 
Waterman, Salome (Allen) .. 150 

Waterman, Stephen 150 

Watson, Samuel 275, 277 

Webster, Lillian R 196 

Webster, Mary A 204 

Wedge, Thomas 275, 277 

Weeks, Hannah (Foster) 151 

Weeks, Katharine (Clark) 151 

Weeks, Lucy 151 

Weeks, Martin 151 

Weeks, Mercie (Richmond) .. 151 

Weeks, Nancy 151 

Weeks, Nathaniel 23. 28, 30, 62, 151 

Weeks, Ruth (Willis) 151 

Weeks, Susanna (daughter of 

Nathaniel) 151 

Weeks, Thomas (father of 

Nathaniel) 151 

Weeks, Thomas (son of 

Nathaniel) 151 

Weld, Edith May (Parker) ... 193 

Weld, Frank 193 

Wellesley College 244, 246 

Wheaton, David 138 

Wheeler, Catherine 253 

Wheeler, John 25, 151-152 

Wheelock, Nancy 220 

Whipple, Lucinda (Ashley) ... 152 
Whipple, Martha (wife of 

Thomas) 152 

Whipple, Nahum 26, 152 

Whipple, Parmela (wife of 

Nahum = Mrs. Thompson). 

,152 

Whipple, Thomas 1 19, 152 

Whitcomb, Bessie M 249 

Whitcomb, Joshua 25, 152 

White, Betsy or Elizabeth 153, 168 

White, David I53 

White, Elizabeth or Betsy 153, 168 

White, Hannah 43 

White, Henry Arthur 203 

White, James 151, i53 



INDEX 



321 



PAGE 

White, Lucy (Weeks) 151 

White, Martha 39 

White, Mary (daughter of 

Thomas) 66, 153 

White, Mary (wife of John 

Harmon) 95 

White, Sarah (Blair) 151, 153 

White, Sergeant 266 

White, Thomas 21, 26, 28, 29, 31, 

33, 66, 137, 151, 152-153, 168 

White, Viana 168 

Whitehouse, Mary J 178 

Whitman, Ebenezer ....32, 153-154 
Whitman, Eleanor (Bennett).. 153 

Whitman, John 153 

Whitman, Ruth (daughter of 

Ebenezer) 154 

Whitman, Ruth (Delano) 154 

Whitman, Sarah 154 

Whitman, Zechariah 153 

Whiting, William R 194 

Whitmore or Whittemore, 

Knight 142, 161, 162 

Whitney, Abigail (wife of 

Alpheus) 200 

Whitney, Alpheus 200 

Whitney, George H 201 

Whitney, Israel 275, 277 

Whitney, Joseph D 200-201 

Whitney, Sophronia (Bemis).. 201 
Whittemore or Whitmore, 

Knight 142, 161, 162 

Whittemore, Lucretia (Stone) . 142 
Whittemore, Mrs. Rachel (wife 

of Daniel Rawson) 221 

Whittemore, Ruth 59 

Wilbur, Charlotte Elizabeth . . 202 

Wilbur, Edwin 183, 201-202 

Wilbur, Eliza (Hagar) 58, 201 

Wilbur, George Edwin 202 

Wilbur, Grace Duell 202 

Wilbur, Horace 201 

Wilbur, Lora Belle 202 

Wilbur, Lucy Edna 202 

Wilbur, Mary Elizabeth (Duell) 202 

Wilbur, Ruth Ayres 202 

Wilder, Sarah D 222 

Wilder, Shubael 25, 154 

Williams, Celia 229 

Williams, Hannah 187 

Williams, Jerry Holden 248 

Williams, Louisa Tower 248 

Williams, Mehitabel 108 

Williams, Sara Amanda 248 



Willis, Abigail 37 

Willis, Bethiah 69, 207, 252 

Willis, Guile 154 

Willis, Jonathan 69, 73 

Willis, Nathaniel 73 

Willis, Ruth 151 

Willis, Dr. Stoughton 37, 69 

Wilson, Agnes 41, 68 

Wilson, Alexander 23, 29, 33, 90, 

106, 155 
Wilson, Elizabeth (Crawford). 155 
Wilson, Huldah (daughter of 

Alexander) 155 

Wilson, Huldah (wife of 

Alexander) 155 

Wilson, Jonathan 155 

Wilson, Laurinda 246 

Wilson, Mary 51 

Wilson, Robert 23, 30, 127, 155-156 

Wilson, Sarah A 260 

Winslow, Hannah (daughter of 

Thomas) 135, 136 

Winslow, Thomas 135 

Wolcott. See also Woolcott. 

Wolcott, Ruth 96 

Wollenhaupt, Rose Pauline . . . 221 
Wood, Abigail Elizabeth 

(Keep) 202, 203 

Wood, Betsy (Crowall) 202 

Wood, Elmer B 202 

Wood, George (father of 

George P. and Lawson D.) 202, 

203 

Wood, George Arthur 202 

Wood, George Paige 202, 203 

Wood, Lawson Dwight 187, 203, 

235 

Wood, Samuel 275, 277 

Wood, Sarah S. (Merrifield) ..202 

Wood, Thomas 202 

Wood, William _. 275, 277 

Woodcock, Lizzie Snow 

(Parker) I94 

Woodcock, William I94 

Woodis, Alden Bradford 171 

Woodis, Catherine (daughter 

of Edward) 171 

Woodis, Catherine (Holmes).. 171 
Woodis, Dorothy (Moore) ... 156 
Woodis, Ebenezer 21, 27, 28, 33, 

156, 170 

Woodis, Ebenezer, Jr 150, 170 

Woodis, Edward 156, 160, 170-171. 

280 



322 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



PAGE 

Woodis, Edward (son of 

Edward) 171 

Woodis, Elizabeth (Woolcott) 156 

Woodis, Field 228 

Woodis, Henrietta 171 

Woodis, John 156 

Woodis, Keziah 156 

Woodis, Lucella L 235 

Woodis, Luther Wilson 171 

Woodis, Minnie Gertrude 

(Dean) 251 

Woodis, Minnie Louise 

(Brooks) 228 

Woodis, Nathan 156 

Woodis, Persis 156 

Woodis, Reuben 156 

Woodis, Ruth 156 

Woodis, Sabra Wiswell (Sibley) 228 

Woodis, Sarah 156 

Woodis, Sibley Field 228 

Woodis, Walter A 251 

Woods, Frances C 178 

Woods, Josiah B 178 

Woodward, Esther 44, 45 

Woolcott. See also Wolcott. 

Woolcott, Elizabeth 156 

Woolcut, John 275, 277 

Woolley, David 242 

Woolley, Hannah (Crawford). 243 



PAGE 

Woolley, Relief Willard 242 

Woolworth, Sarah Maria . . 196, 197 

Wright, Alfred Parks 243, 244 

Wright, Alice Lincoln ....243, 244 

Wright, Ebenezer 275, 277 

Wright, Ellsworth 243 

Wright, Emeline Augusta 217 

Wright, Eunitia D 195 

Wright, George C 217 

Wright, Henry Burt 243, 244 

Wright, Henry Parks 7, 8, 71, 164, 

242-244 

Wright, James 214 

Wright, Josephine Lemira 

(Hayward) 244 

Wright, Lydia B 214 

Wright, Martha Elizabeth 

(Burt) 243 

Wright, Parks 242 

Wright, Relief Willard 

(Woolley) 242 

Wright, Deacon Samuel 242 

Wright, Serviah 113 

Yale College 62, 159, 170, 207, 243, 

244 

Young, Lydia A 263 

Young, Mary T 191 



INDEX OF TOWNS 

(in Massachusetts, unless otherwise indicated) 



PAGE 

Acton 249 

Adams iii 

Antrim, N. H 189, 232 

Ashfield 65 

Ashland 177, 178 

Athol 215, 236 

Augusta, Ga 227 

Ayer 249 

Ayer Junction 194 

Barnstable 114, 115, 116, 117 

Barre 36, 41, 44, 115, 117, 120, 134, 
136, 137, 138, 154, 166, 169, 182, 
185, 194, 196, 201, 209, 218, 221, 
226, 229, 231, 239, 24s, 246, 249, 
257 
Barre Plains 182 



PAGE 

Bath, Me 108 

Belchertown 251 

Belegaley, Ireland 41 

Berkley 88, 271, 278 

Bethany, N. Y 233 

Bethel, Vt 202 

Beverly 129, 132 

Blandford 98 

Bolton 56 

Boston 50, 86, 140, 186, 189, 216, 
221, 232, 250, 253, 281 

Boylston 79 

Boylston Center I95 

Boxboro 249 

Bradford 178 

Braintree 36 

Braintree, Vt 279 



INDEX 



323 



PAGE 

Brattleboro 254, 260 

Bridgewater 36, 37, 49, 65, 66, 67, 
73, 76, 80, 119, 120, 129, 132, 
149, 150, 153, 189, 207, 244 

Bristol, Conn 251 

Brookiield 63, 64, 71, 75, 85, 89, 113, 
128, 133, 134, 13s, 180, 192, 193, 
194, 201, 202, 224, 231, 277 

Brooklyn, N. Y 252 

Buffalo, N. Y 259 

Bull Creek, Kansas 257 

Cambridge 278 

Canterbury, Conn 219, 220 

Cappy, Ireland 68 

Castle Creek, N. Y 48 

Cedar Falls, la 240 

Chard, England 186 

Charlestown, N. H 259 

Charlottetown, P. E. 1 216 

Charlton 187, 246 

Chatham, N. Y 198 

Chelmsford 45 

Cherokee, la 240, 241 

Chester 42, 43 

Chester, Pa 252 

Cincinnati, 243 

Cleveland, 279 

Clinton 166, 217 

Coaticook, P. Q 258 

Cohockton, N. Y 123 

Concord 74, 87, 98, 99 

Cornish 54 

Council Bluffs, la 227, 228 

Craftsbury, Vt 89 

Danielson, Conn 236 

Dartmouth 138, 139, 196 

Davenport, la 282 

Deadwood, S. Dak 213 

Dedham 220, 244 

Derby, Conn 170 

Detroit, Mich 258 

Dighton 37 

Dorchester 53, 80, 189, 216, 217, 253 

Dracut 250 

Dunbarton, N. H 37. 165 

East Brookfield 206 

East Somerville 191 

Easthampton 187 

Eaton, Canada 63 

Eaton, N. Y 102 

Elizabeth, N. J 169 



PAGE 

Enfield 178, 179, 251 

Exeter, N. H 218 

Fairfield, Conn 231 

Farmington, N. H 178 

Fenton, Mich 258 

Fitchburg 126, 185 

Foxcroft, Me 59 

Framingham 121 

Franconia, N. H 189 

Franklin 128, 195, 239, 244 

Gardner 220, 222, 231 

Gilbertville 185, 253 

Glastonbury, Conn 228 

Gorham, Me 93 

Grafton 223, 228 

Granby 245 

Greenwich 49 

Groveland 178 

Guildhall, Vt 40 

Guilford, Vt 208 

Hadley, N. Y 145 

Hallowell, Me 142 

Hammonton, N. J 196, 197 

Hardwick 76, 91, iiS, 117, 123, 133, 

135, 136, 151, 152, 154, 207, 231, 

238 

Hartford, Conn 195, 196, 221 

Haverstraw, N. Y 282 

Herkimer, N. Y 220 

Hiawatha, Kansas 180, 251 

Hingham 108 

Hinsdale, N. H 242, 260 

Holden I93, 214, 219, 228 

Holly. Mich 258 

Hopkinton 42, 118, 196, 208 

Hubbardston 36, 187, 209, 229 

Hudson 219 

Hyannis ii5 

Hyde Park 189, 246 

Kansas City, Mo 227 

Killmorgan, Ireland 209 

Lancaster 233 

Lancaster, N. H 258 

Lancaster, Mo 279 

Lanesborough 277 

Leicester 82, 90, 153. 164, 188, 222, 
230, 231, 241, 242, 246 

Lee 245 

Lewiston, Me 108 



324 



SOLDIERS OF OAKHAM 



Lexington 140, 141 

Lincoln, R. 1 246 

Littleton 232 

Littleton, Colo 188 

Longmeadow 176 

Loudon, Tenn 234 

Loveland, Colo 240 

Lowell 252 

Lynn 60, 177 

Malone, N. Y 216 

Manchester, N. H. ...256, 258, 259 

Marion, la 240 

Marlboro 56, 214 

Marshalltown, la 282 

Medfield 127, 128, 129 

Medford 186 

Medway 36, 89, 154, 166, 244 

Melbourne, Australia 252 

Mendon 195, 220 

Middleboro 76, 88, 89, 116, 129, 180, 
215, 261, 277, 278 

Millbury 219 

Millidgeville, Ga no 

Monson 202 

Montague 150 

Mystic, Conn 251 

Nantucket iSo 

Newark, 262, 263 

Newark, Vt 217 

New Ashford 277 

New Bedford 116 

New Braintree 2>7, 42, 48, 52, 61, 
^'2, 63, TZ, 76, 81, 84, 87, 89, 90, 

94, 96, 97, 104, IDS, 108, 109, 

no, 119, 127, 128, 137, 151, 152, 
153, 158, 159, 160, 162, 165, 168, 
170, 171, 180, 187, 192, 193, 194, 
222, 224, 233, 235, 277, 279 

Newbury 75, 177 

New Haven, Conn. 236, 242, 243, 
244, 271 

New Oregon, la 259, 260 

New Orleans, La 282 

New Salem 186 

Newton 134 

New York, N. Y 231, 252, 259 

Northboro ..135, 170, 208, 211, 262 
North Brookfield 89, 172, 180, 181, 
192, 196, 197, 198, 201, 203, 204, 
205, 206, 209, 215, 220, 226, 227, 
230, 231, 232, 235, 239, 240, 24s, 
253. 255, 256, 260, 261 



PAGE 

Northfield 47, 80, 98, 124 

Nyack, N. Y 282 

Oakland, Cal 181, 239 

Oldham, England 260 

Omaha, Neb 227, 228 

Onondaga, N. Y 60 

Orange 216, 260 

Oskaloosa, la 282 

Oxford, Me 254 

Oxford, Mich 258 

Paris, Me 259 

Pasadena, Cal 223 

Paxton 37, 55, 64, 74, 118, 125, I3i, 

148, 165, 201, 206, 219, 224, 241 

Pelham 104, 233 

Pembroke 132 

Perkins, 233 

Petersham 229 

Philadelphia, Pa 195, 196 

Pittsford, N. Y 117 

Plainfield, Conn 220 

Plymouth 116, 139 

Pontiac, Mich 258 

Portland, S. Dak 213 

Poultney, Vt 136 

Princeton 168, 192, 198 

Providence, R, L 191, 198, 210, 221, 

235, 236, 246, 247 

Putney, Vt 90 

Quincy 231, 253 

Rehoboth 80, 107, 108 

Revere 239 

Rochdale, England 259 

Rochester, N. Y 221 

Rockville, Cal 62 

Royalston 277 

Rutland, zd, 41, 44, 45, 49. 50, 53, 
55, 57, 58, (i7, 68, 69, 70, 72, 74, 
75, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 88, 
90, 92, 93, 98, 99, 100, loi, 103, 
no, 112, 113, 114, 117, 140, 141, 
143, 155, 163, 167, 169, 180, 185, 
187, 197, 200, 203, 204, 208, 221, 
222, 237, 251, 254, 261, 282 

St. Albans, Canada 68 

St. Mary's, Ga 150 

Salem 67, 86, 88, 168 

Salem, N. Y 117 

Sandwich 115 



INDEX 



325 



San Francisco, Cal 177 

Scotland, Conn 219, 220 

Scranton, Pa 228, 229 

Shippingport, Pa 222 

Shrewsbury no, 177 

Shutesbury 66 

Somers, Conn 170 

Somerville 186 

South Danvers 86 

South Hadley 245 

South Sudbury 192 

Spencer 59, 89, 99, 146, 148, 164, 

188, 192, 197, 204, 208, 209, 237, 

249, 261 
Springfield 177, 232, 233, 234, 235, 

242, 250, 282 

Springfield, Vt 240 

StaflFord. Conn 148, 149 

Stark, N. H 42 

Sterling 169 

Stockbridge, Vt 260, 278, 279 

Stoneham 217 

Stonington, Conn 251 

Sudbury 97, 105, 106, 107, 121, 123, 

125, 126, 134, 156, 189, 190, 191, 

223, 230 

Suflfield, Conn 36 

Sunderland 186 

Sutton 138 

Taunton 108, 109, no, 186, 244 

Templeton 240, 277 

Tiffin, 87 

Tippecanoe, Mo 279 

Turner, Me 59 

Utica, 263 

Waltham 58, I34, iQi, 222, 



PAGE 

Wardsboro, Vt 48 

Ware ...151, 187, 209, 238, 245, 261 

Wareham 150 

Warner, N. H 217 

Warren 39, 43, 94, 95, 112, 182, 238, 
239 

Watertown 57, 134, 200 

Watervliet, N. Y 48 

Wayland 191 

West Acton 249 

West Boylston 78, 79, 205 

Westboro ...178, 179, 187, 246, 255 
West Brookfield 27, 200, 201, 202, 
203, 221, 236, 238, 241 

West Burke, Vt 217 

Westford, Vt no 

West Halifax, Vt 254 

West Springfield 176,244 

Weston 56, 57, 58, 141, 184 

Weymouth 153 

Wheeling, W. Va 167 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 228, 229 

Willimansett 195 

Wilmington, Del I95 

Wilton, N. H 151 

Winchester 232 

Winchester, N. H 242 

Windham, Conn 219, 220 

Winfield, Kansas 213 

Woonsocket, R. 1 236 

Worcester i77, 185, 187, 188, 189. 
193, 194, 19s, 196, 198, 205, 208, 
209, 217, 218, 219, 221, 222, 228, 
230, 227, 238, 239, 242, 244, 246, 
248, 252, 25s, 258, 259, 261, 263 
Wrentham 257 

Yokohama, Japan 234